Feed on
Posts
Comments

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

FACULTY/SOPHOMORE SUPPER SERIES

Defining Your Interests and Making Informed Choices

 

Reminder to RSVP today!  Only a few spaces left.

 

Guests of Honor:

Professor Victoria Pitts-Taylor, FGSS

and

Assistant Professor Kerwin Kaye, Sociology

 

Come and enjoy a three-course meal while you talk with Professors Pitts-Taylor and Kaye

in an informal setting about their experience as undergrads, their path to the academy,

their research and teaching, and why they love what they do.

 

Wednesday, October 29 at 6 p.m.,  Limited Seating

RSVP required by Tuesday, October 28 at noon to skulesza@wesleyan.edu

 

Co-hosted by Dean Brown, Deans’ Office/Student Affairs,

and Liliana Carrasquilla-Vasquez, Residential Life/Student Affairs, and

joined by Persephone Hall, Wesleyan Career Center

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Lily Baggott ’15

[Joseph Fins ’82]Chief of the Division of Medical Ethics at Weill Cornell Medical College Dr. Joseph Fins ’82 weighs in on Ebola from a dual medical and ethical standpoint in a recent post for the Hastings Center’s online Bioethics Forum. The post, picked up by the New York Times, evaluates the risks of CPR on both the patient with Ebola and the caregivers.

“Patients with Ebola should receive all medical measures and experimental interventions including ICU care. […] But the line should be drawn at CPR. Unilateral do-not-resuscitate orders would seem justifiable under these circumstances,” he concludes in the post.

The Ebola crisis has prompted a leading medical ethicist to raise an uncomfortable end-of-life question that doctors may have to address sooner than they would like: Should a medical team try to resuscitate an Ebola patient whose heart stops beating?

The ethicist, Dr. Joseph J. Fins, says that the answer should be no — that the risks of cardiopulmonary resuscitation efforts are too great for health care workers and even for some Ebola patients whose heartbeat is restored.

And he is urging a national debate on the question now — before doctors and nurses have to make a hasty decision when an emergency code for CPR is sounded.

“Every clinician in the United States would like this issue to be discussed, and we need guidance on it,” Dr. Fins, an internal-medicine specialist who is director of medical ethics at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell hospital in Manhattan, said in an interview.

Read more…

Image: c/o Wesleyan University

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20141028-joseph-fins

Related links

[LinkedIn] connect with Joseph Fins on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Cynthia Rockwell

[Nathan Rich '02]Architect Nathan Rich ’02, a principal of Peterson Rich Office in New York City, joined forces with co-principal Miriam Peterson and one other young architect, all three fellows at the Institute for Public Architecture, to offer “9′ x 18′.” This proposal proposal offers a novel approach in New York City’s efforts to create or preserve 200,000 subsidized housing units over the next ten years.
In “9′ x 18′,” named for the size of an average parking space, the three architects reconsider how these area reserved for cars could be reconsidered or leveraged in the face of outmoded zoning laws. They re-imagine more desirable amenities that public housing complexes might offer, instead of these measured asphalt spaces.

In a New York Times article, Michael Kimmelman explores this proposal:

What is the solution to affordable housing in New York?

One number has been repeated over and over — 200,000 subsidized units, to be built or preserved over a decade. Mayor Bill de Blasio promised it, but has yet to explain how he’ll get there.

Here are two other numbers: 9 x 18. In square feet, that’s 162, smaller than the most micro micro-apartment.

It is the size of a typical parking space. That lowly slice of asphalt has prompted three young architects — Miriam Peterson, Sagi Golan and Nathan Rich, fellows at the Institute for Public Architecture — to come up with what could be an innovative way to ease the housing crisis.

Read more…

Image: c/o Nathan Rich

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20141028-nathan-rich

Related links

[Facebook]add Nathan Rich on Facebook ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Nathan Rich on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Lily Baggott ’15

[Joseph Fins ’82]Chief of the Division of Medical Ethics at Weill Cornell Medical College Dr. Joseph Fins ’82 weighs in on Ebola from a dual medical and ethical standpoint in a recent post for the Hastings Center’s online Bioethics Forum. The post, picked up by the New York Times, evaluates the risks of CPR on both the patient with Ebola and the caregivers.

“Patients with Ebola should receive all medical measures and experimental interventions including ICU care. […] But the line should be drawn at CPR. Unilateral do-not-resuscitate orders would seem justifiable under these circumstances,” he concludes in the post.

The Ebola crisis has prompted a leading medical ethicist to raise an uncomfortable end-of-life question that doctors may have to address sooner than they would like: Should a medical team try to resuscitate an Ebola patient whose heart stops beating?

The ethicist, Dr. Joseph J. Fins, says that the answer should be no — that the risks of cardiopulmonary resuscitation efforts are too great for health care workers and even for some Ebola patients whose heartbeat is restored.

And he is urging a national debate on the question now — before doctors and nurses have to make a hasty decision when an emergency code for CPR is sounded.

“Every clinician in the United States would like this issue to be discussed, and we need guidance on it,” Dr. Fins, an internal-medicine specialist who is director of medical ethics at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell hospital in Manhattan, said in an interview.

Read more…

Image: c/o Wesleyan University

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20141028-joseph-fins

Related links

[LinkedIn] connect with Joseph Fins on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Cynthia Rockwell

[Nathan Rich '02]Architect Nathan Rich ’02, a principal of Peterson Rich Office in New York City, joined forces with co-principal Miriam Peterson and one other young architect, all three fellows at the Institute for Public Architecture, to offer “9′x18′.” This proposal proposal offers a novel approach in New York City’s efforts to create or preserve 200,000 subsidized housing units over the next ten years.
In “9′x19′,” named for the size of an average parking space, the three architects reconsider how these area reserved for cars could be reconsidered or leveraged in the face of outmoded zoning laws. They re-imagine more desirable amenities that public housing complexes might offer, instead of these measured asphalt spaces.

In a New York Times article, Michael Kimmelman explores this proposal:

What is the solution to affordable housing in New York?

One number has been repeated over and over — 200,000 subsidized units, to be built or preserved over a decade. Mayor Bill de Blasio promised it, but has yet to explain how he’ll get there.

Here are two other numbers: 9 x 18. In square feet, that’s 162, smaller than the most micro micro-apartment.

It is the size of a typical parking space. That lowly slice of asphalt has prompted three young architects — Miriam Peterson, Sagi Golan and Nathan Rich, fellows at the Institute for Public Architecture — to come up with what could be an innovative way to ease the housing crisis.

Read more…

Image: c/o Nathan Rich

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20141028-nathan-rich

Related links

[Facebook]add Nathan Rich on Facebook ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Nathan Rich on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Visiting professor and Harber Fellow Jack Dougherty brings a fascinating new course to Wesleyan’s Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life this spring. In CSPL 341, students will examine the controversial intersection of education and entrepreneurship not just by reading theory and research on the subject, but also by looking at the effects of recent policy changes and honing their own research skills in the process.

Description from WesMaps:

In this seminar, we will investigate an increasingly popular reform movement–choice–to better understand what happens when educators act more like entrepreneurs in competing for students, how families navigate both schooling and housing markets, and the outcomes of recent policy innovations. Drawing from the disciplines of history, sociology, and government, we will compare and contrast choice models that have been promoted by charter schools, magnet schools, and move-to-opportunity housing experiments. Teams of student researchers will conduct quantitative analyses of choice data and qualitative interviews with parents and stakeholders in Hartford.

Interested students should email the instructor (jack.dougherty@trincoll.edu) explaining their research interests and related coursework. Read more about the course here, and check out Prof. Doughterty’s reflection on his CT Mirror Hackathon experiences.

Reblogged from: African Studies Cluster @ Wesleyan. (Go to the original post…)

Nov. 6 from 5-6pm in the Zelnick Pavilion

(Refreshments Provided)

Come Meet the African Studies Faculty

Learn How to Build Your Own African Studies Course Concentration

Meet the Faculty and Learn About Upcoming Events!

All are Welcome!

 

Reblogged from: class of 2015. (Go to the original post…)

We Speak We Stand – Wesleyan’s Bystander Intervention Program

We are having our next campus-wide training November 3rd, 7:00-10:00pm in 41 Wyllys room 112.

Become an active bystander by registering for Wesleyan’s bystander intervention training! Empowered bystanders make the campus community safer by standing up and speaking out when they witness situations that could potentially harm the health and safety of others. Intervening with peers can be difficult for a number of reasons and training will provide you with the skills to move from inaction to action and intervene safely and effectively.

The training features two distinct and separate tracks: sexual violence prevention and alcohol use intervention.

Register here by October 31st: https://docs.google.com/a/wesleyan.edu/forms/d/1W5qwZTGtalI9_zgOgc9R1rilBJa6GVV9wYKuDVKDCDA/viewform

Dinner included!

Would you like your undergraduate major to help you: 

  • Acquire familiarity with another culture on that culture’s terms?
  • Acquire the kind of linguistic and cross-cultural proficiency required for 21st-c. life and careers?
  • Put you into deep and meaningful contact with some of the most rewarding literary, cinematic, and visual texts ever created?
  • Explore the past as it unfolds in France and the Francophone world, Italy, and Spain and the Hispanophone world, including Latin America?
  • Incorporate study abroad as a key component of your studies at Wesleyan?

Date: Monday, November 3, 2014
Time: Noon
Place: 300 High Street, The Common Room

Pizza will be served!!

If you are contemplating a major in one of our programs but cannot attend the information session on November 3, please contact the appropriate major representative:

French Studies:  Catherine Ostrow (costrow@wesleyan.edu)

Italian Studies:  Ellen Nerenberg (enerenberg@wesleyan.edu)

Hispanic Literature and Cultures:  Maria Ospina (mospina@wesleyan.edu)

Romance Studies:  Michael Armstrong-Roche (marmstrong@wesleyan.edu)

Red Cross Blood Drive

Reblogged from: class of 2015. (Go to the original post…)

The drive will take place on Tuesday, October 28th from 11:45am-5pm in Beckham Hall.

To make an appointment people can email sdiazroa@wesleyan.edu or you can sign up at http://www.redcrossblood.org/make-donation

Facts about blood donation:
Someone needs blood every two seconds.
One pint of blood (one donation) can save up to three lives.
About 1 in 7 people entering a hospital need blood.
More than 4.5 million patients need blood transfusions each year in the U.S. and Canada.
If only one more percent of all Americans would give blood, blood shortages would disappear for the foreseeable future.With all the tragedies that are occurring everyday in the US, blood is constantly in need to save lives.

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

Log in