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Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

We are pleased to announce a new book by Fred Moten, The Little Edges.

moten

Poems that play in the sonic texture of discourses

The Little Edges is a collection of occasional pieces in which Fred Moten extends his experimentation in what he calls “shaped prose”—a way of arranging prose in rhythmic blocks, or sometimes shards, in the interest of audio-visual patterning. Moten uses shaped prose to work the “little edges” of the lyric, blurring the lines between poetry and theoretical discourse. The poems—swelling with life, sensuality, and musicality­—are inspired by jazz, everyday speech, and by the urban spaces of modern life.

As occasional pieces, many of the poems in the book are the result of a request or commission to comment upon a work of art, or to memorialize a particular moment or person. For example, Moten pays homage Nancy Wilson and Jaki Byard, as well as to dancer/choreographer Ralph Lemon and filmmaker Arthur Jafa. The matter and energy of a singular event or person are transformed by their entrance into and interaction with social spaces. These spaces, are in turn, transformed. The poems blend joy and gravitas; they aim “to solemnize in joy…to sing praise…to assemble in disassembly.”

An online reader’s companion is available at http://fredmoten.site.wesleyan.edu.

Click here to order this book.

Also available as an ebook—check with your favorite ebook retailer.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

akomfrahgment

the praline of amusement and.
my cliometric pearl can’t call it.
curve unnumbered. you can’t

ride that long, you can’t turn
that far, that cold coming and
going in and out of snow. the
speed of our washing is blinding
and our devotion is laughing
without a name or song. this is
our music. we’re many hymns
in love with each other
warring out of circle almost,
almost frozen, color become
shape, you put your coat on me.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

WEServe is a worldwide week of service for the entire Wesleyan community. Students, alumni, faculty, staff, parents and grandparents, former employees, future students, and friends are invited to come together for activities that serve others. Projects can involve any number of participants and any kind of volunteer work, whether it’s traditional service, like assisting a school or food pantry, or something innovative that supports a local non-profit.

WEServe spans the end of Winter Break and the beginning of the spring semester, so people can plan projects in their hometowns, in Middletown, or wherever in the world they’re traveling. This is an especially good opportunity for graduates looking to connect with alumni in their area, or students who already miss their Wesleyan family (only 36 days left of break!).

Register your project by Wednesday, December 31, or sign up for someone else’s project by Friday, January 9.

More information: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/weserve
Photos from previous WEServe projects: bit.ly/1AgIPuj

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Lily Baggott ’15

[Wolf 359 in recording]Gabriel Urbina ’13, Zach Valenti ’12, Emma Sherr-Ziarko ’11, Michaela Swee ’12, and Alan Rodi ’12 led separate lives at Wesleyan. Now just a few years after graduating, they’ve all come together to share their talents with each other and the podcast world. Wolf 359 follows the lives of Eiffel, Minkowski, Hilbert, and Hera, a motley crew aboard the U.S.S. Hephaestus space station. Urbina ’13 serves as the show’s creator, writer, and co-producer; Valenti ’12 as co-producer and the voices of Eiffel and Hilbert; Ziarko ’11 as the voice of Minkowski; Swee ’12 as the voice of Hera; and Rodi ’12 as the show’s composer. The five collaborators took the time to answer a few questions about the past, present, and future of Wolf 359.

WESCONNECT: How and why did you get involved in the project?

GABRIEL: I came up with the concept for Wolf 359 a few months ago. I had just finished a few months of work on a film and was looking for a new creative project to dive into. I was sitting in a coffee shop, procrastinating the mountain of applications I had for the day, when the image of a radio operator stuck on a space station, far away from Earth, and picking up weird transmissions popped into my head, more or less fully formed. Normally that’s as far as it would have gone, but a mutual friend put me in touch with Zach, who loved the idea and encouraged me to go back and figure out the rest of the characters and the story. So the seed of the idea was mine, but he was the one that really pushed us into actually making the show.

WC: What have each of you found—in your roles as writers, actors, producers, and composers—to be the biggest advantages and disadvantages of the podcast platform?

GABRIEL: As a writer, the answer to both of those questions is the same thing: the audience can’t see what’s happening. On one level, there’s something about only getting a slice of what’s going on and have to fill in the rest. I find that being in that state really sucks you into whatever is happening. The flipside is that you have to get your audience to that level of engagement. And you gotta do that without the immediate razzle-dazzle that you can throw at them with a visual medium. Basically, it’s a constant process of trying to find not just good stories, but good stories that feel like they are a really good fit with the medium.

EMMA: I come from a theater background, so the whole concept of “takes” is sort of foreign and marvelous to me. To be able to make mistakes and correct them, or approach text in different ways and let Gabriel decide what works in the editing room, is liberating. Also, it has been a great challenge and an adjustment to convey a character simply through the voice.

Probably the hardest adjustment to make has been reconciling my performance with the instrument in front of me—namely, the microphone. I’m used to engaging with a live person. I’m lucky because I’ve gotten to be in the studio with Zach for every recording session and he’s a totally awesome and giving acting partner.

ZACH: As a filmmaker, it’s awesome to be able to tell stories that would require an astronomical budget to pull off as a web series or TV pilot. And unlike a web-comic, I get to stretch a lot of muscles as a performer — playing two characters, for instance The only thing I could complain about is that I’ve found it harder to get people to listen to a 15 minute podcast than watch a 3-minute YouTube video. But that could be changing, like you’re seeing with “Serial.”

WC: What’s it like working as a group of Wes grads? Is it a collaborative process?

GABRIEL: We’ve been really blessed in that, even after a few months of doing the show, we have yet to work with anyone who isn’t a Wesleyan alum. Wes grads, on top of always being the smartest people in the room, basically know no fear. There is nothing they can’t roll with and improve upon, and working under those conditions really helps you to be better at your own job.

EMMA: It’s kind of the dream for a collaborative project. Even though Wolf 359 is definitely Gabriel’s baby, he has given each of us a lot of ownership and agency over the project as a whole.

MICHAELA: I absolutely love working with Gabriel, Zach, Emma, and Alan. I feel a deep bond with them, even though we led separate lives at Wesleyan and continue to lead separate post-graduate lives. I don’t’ know what else to say…this crew is just the best.

ZACH: It’s difficult to express how awesome it’s been working with an all Wes grad cast & crew. Though none of us were very close in college, there was an affinity and camaraderie from the start. The whole project has matured into an incredibly fulfilling creative partnership.

WC: Gabriel, you were a Film Studies major at Wesleyan and produced a senior film thesis. Is this your first time producing a podcast? Did your studies at Wesleyan prepare you to do so?

GABRIEL: This is the first time that I’ve done a long-form podcasting project. What’s great about the WEs Film Studies program is that, yes, film is the primary tool on hand and the entry point for the discussion, but the big, underlying concepts are all about communicating with and understanding an audience, about storytelling. I find myself rereading my notebooks from classes on Hitchcock or screenwriting while writing the scripts for Wolf 359.

WC: Emma, what’s it like playing the proud military veteran Minkowski? What are your favorite aspects of the character?

EMMA: I love playing Minkowski, because she is, in so many ways, so very different from me. She’s very strict, by-the-book, very left-brained, rigorous and disciplined—an ideal military commander. Another great aspect of the podcast format is the serial nature of it. I love that I get to keep exploring new facets of Minkowski, whether it’s the catfight she has with Hera or the catastrophic revival of “Pirates of Penzance” that she tries to stage, we’re starting to get glimpses of who Minkowski is outside of the realm of the Hephaestus.

WC: Michaela, how do you bring a programming system to life in playing Hera?

MICHAELA: Hera is a very interesting character. She’s not a human being like Eiffel and Minkowski, but I also don’t feel entirely comfortable calling her a computer. She’s a modern, futuristic hybrid—a programming system that is not human flesh and blood, but who has the emotional intelligence and social capabilities of a human being. Bringing Hera to life enough so that she is not just a piece of technology but also keeping her limited enough so as not to make her entirely human is a tough balance to strike and something I play around with during every recording session.

WC: Zach, your bio notes that you’re a voice-over artist. How do you make switch between Eiffel and Hilbert? How do you differentiate the two characters?

ZACH: I primarily differentiate the two characters with accents – Hilbert has an Eastern European thing going on, while Eiffel is basically what I normally sound like. As a professional voice-over artist, I’m primarily trained for commercial work, for which I’m represented by Atlas Talent. I’ve loved doing fake accents since as long as I can remember.

WC: Alan, where does your inspiration come from for the Wolf 359 music?

ALAN: Mostly late nights and caffeine. Otherwise I’m inspired by a mix of video game music and electronica of many varieties, from The Knife (I highly suggest listening to their music for Tomorrow, in a Year, a modern opera based on Charle’s Darwin’s The Origin of Species) to Darren Korb, who composed for Bastion and Transistor, beautiful examples of music’s seamless integration into a video game soundscape.

WC: What’s in store for Wolf 359 in the future?

GABRIEL: The show’s going to be moving away from standalone episodes, trying to tell a few bigger stories and dive into a few of the really weird things that are going on around that space station. So stay tuned—things are only going to get crazier from here on out.

EMMA: I’m just hoping we get to record at least one episode from outer space.

ZACH: It’d be nice to make back the money we’ve already invested and get compensated for our time, but none of us got into it for that. The priority is and always has been making the most awesome show we can and building the largest possible audience for it. To follow in Night Vale’s footsteps and get to do a live tour could be a lot of fun. Not sure if there’s a precedent for this, but I would love to see Wolf 359 get syndicated on the actual radio. I’d happily settle for some viral Twitter/Tumblr/Facebook action, though.

Learn more about Wolf 359…

Image: c/o Gabriel Urbina ’13

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20141216-wolf-359

#THISISWHY

Related links

[Facebook]Wolf 359 on Facebook ➞

[Facebook]Emma Sherr-Ziarko on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @wolf359radio on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Alan Rodi on LinkedIn ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Zach Valenti on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Lily Baggott ’15

[Wolf 359 in recording]Gabriel Urbina ’13, Zach Valenti ’12, Emma Sherr-Ziarko ’11, Michaela Swee ’12, and Alan Rodi ’12 led separate lives at Wesleyan. Now just a few years after graduating, they’ve all come together to share their talents with each other and the podcast world. Wolf 359 follows the lives of Eiffel, Minkowski, Hilbert, and Hera, a motley crew aboard the U.S.S. Hephaestus space station. Urbina ’13 serves as the show’s creator, writer, and co-producer; Valenti ’12 as co-producer and the voices of Eiffel and Hilbert; Ziarko ’11 as the voice of Minkowski; Swee ’12 as the voice of Hera; and Rodi ’12 as the show’s composer. The five collaborators took the time to answer a few questions about the past, present, and future of Wolf 359.

WESCONNECT: How and why did you get involved in the project?

GABRIEL: I came up with the concept for Wolf 359 a few months ago. I had just finished a few months of work on a film and was looking for a new creative project to dive into. I was sitting in a coffee shop, procrastinating the mountain of applications I had for the day, when the image of a radio operator stuck on a space station, far away from Earth, and picking up weird transmissions popped into my head, more or less fully formed. Normally that’s as far as it would have gone, but a mutual friend put me in touch with Zach, who loved the idea and encouraged me to go back and figure out the rest of the characters and the story. So the seed of the idea was mine, but he was the one that really pushed us into actually making the show.

WC: What have each of you found—in your roles as writers, actors, producers, and composers—to be the biggest advantages and disadvantages of the podcast platform?

GABRIEL: As a writer, the answer to both of those questions is the same thing: the audience can’t see what’s happening. On one level, there’s something about only getting a slice of what’s going on and have to fill in the rest. I find that being in that state really sucks you into whatever is happening. The flipside is that you have to get your audience to that level of engagement. And you gotta do that without the immediate razzle-dazzle that you can throw at them with a visual medium. Basically, it’s a constant process of trying to find not just good stories, but good stories that feel like they are a really good fit with the medium.

EMMA: I come from a theater background, so the whole concept of “takes” is sort of foreign and marvelous to me. To be able to make mistakes and correct them, or approach text in different ways and let Gabriel decide what works in the editing room, is liberating. Also, it has been a great challenge and an adjustment to convey a character simply through the voice.

Probably the hardest adjustment to make has been reconciling my performance with the instrument in front of me—namely, the microphone. I’m used to engaging with a live person. I’m lucky because I’ve gotten to be in the studio with Zach for every recording session and he’s a totally awesome and giving acting partner.

ZACH: As a filmmaker, it’s awesome to be able to tell stories that would require an astronomical budget to pull off as a web series or TV pilot. And unlike a web-comic, I get to stretch a lot of muscles as a performer — playing two characters, for instance The only thing I could complain about is that I’ve found it harder to get people to listen to a 15 minute podcast than watch a 3-minute YouTube video. But that could be changing, like you’re seeing with “Serial.”

WC: What’s it like working as a group of Wes grads? Is it a collaborative process?

GABRIEL: We’ve been really blessed in that, even after a few months of doing the show, we have yet to work with anyone who isn’t a Wesleyan alum. Wes grads, on top of always being the smartest people in the room, basically know no fear. There is nothing they can’t roll with and improve upon, and working under those conditions really helps you to be better at your own job.

EMMA: It’s kind of the dream for a collaborative project. Even though Wolf 359 is definitely Gabriel’s baby, he has given each of us a lot of ownership and agency over the project as a whole.

MICHAELA: I absolutely love working with Gabriel, Zach, Emma, and Alan. I feel a deep bond with them, even though we led separate lives at Wesleyan and continue to lead separate post-graduate lives. I don’t’ know what else to say…this crew is just the best.

ZACH: It’s difficult to express how awesome it’s been working with an all Wes grad cast & crew. Though none of us were very close in college, there was an affinity and camaraderie from the start. The whole project has matured into an incredibly fulfilling creative partnership.

WC: Gabriel, you were a Film Studies major at Wesleyan and produced a senior film thesis. Is this your first time producing a podcast? Did your studies at Wesleyan prepare you to do so?

GABRIEL: This is the first time that I’ve done a long-form podcasting project. What’s great about the WEs Film Studies program is that, yes, film is the primary tool on hand and the entry point for the discussion, but the big, underlying concepts are all about communicating with and understanding an audience, about storytelling. I find myself rereading my notebooks from classes on Hitchcock or screenwriting while writing the scripts for Wolf 359.

WC: Emma, what’s it like playing the proud military veteran Minkowski? What are your favorite aspects of the character?

EMMA: I love playing Minkowski, because she is, in so many ways, so very different from me. She’s very strict, by-the-book, very left-brained, rigorous and disciplined—an ideal military commander. Another great aspect of the podcast format is the serial nature of it. I love that I get to keep exploring new facets of Minkowski, whether it’s the catfight she has with Hera or the catastrophic revival of “Pirates of Penzance” that she tries to stage, we’re starting to get glimpses of who Minkowski is outside of the realm of the Hephaestus.

WC: Michaela, how do you bring a programming system to life in playing Hera?

MICHAELA: Hera is a very interesting character. She’s not a human being like Eiffel and Minkowski, but I also don’t feel entirely comfortable calling her a computer. She’s a modern, futuristic hybrid—a programming system that is not human flesh and blood, but who has the emotional intelligence and social capabilities of a human being. Bringing Hera to life enough so that she is not just a piece of technology but also keeping her limited enough so as not to make her entirely human is a tough balance to strike and something I play around with during every recording session.

WC: Zach, your bio notes that you’re a voice-over artist. How do you make switch between Eiffel and Hilbert? How do you differentiate the two characters?

ZACH: I primarily differentiate the two characters with accents – Hilbert has an Eastern European thing going on, while Eiffel is basically what I normally sound like. As a professional voice-over artist, I’m primarily trained for commercial work, for which I’m represented by Atlas Talent. I’ve loved doing fake accents since as long as I can remember.

WC: Alan, where does your inspiration come from for the Wolf 359 music?

ALAN: Mostly late nights and caffeine. Otherwise I’m inspired by a mix of video game music and electronica of many varieties, from The Knife (I highly suggest listening to their music for Tomorrow, in a Year, a modern opera based on Charle’s Darwin’s The Origin of Species) to Darren Korb, who composed for Bastion and Transistor, beautiful examples of music’s seamless integration into a video game soundscape.

WC: What’s in store for Wolf 359 in the future?

GABRIEL: The show’s going to be moving away from standalone episodes, trying to tell a few bigger stories and dive into a few of the really weird things that are going on around that space station. So stay tuned—things are only going to get crazier from here on out.

EMMA: I’m just hoping we get to record at least one episode from outer space.

ZACH: It’d be nice to make back the money we’ve already invested and get compensated for our time, but none of us got into it for that. The priority is and always has been making the most awesome show we can and building the largest possible audience for it. To follow in Night Vale’s footsteps and get to do a live tour could be a lot of fun. Not sure if there’s a precedent for this, but I would love to see Wolf 359 get syndicated on the actual radio. I’d happily settle for some viral Twitter/Tumblr/Facebook action, though.

Learn more about Wolf 359…

Image: c/o Gabriel Urbina ’13

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20141216-wolf-359

#THISISWHY

Related links

[Facebook]Wolf 359 on Facebook ➞

[Facebook]Emma Sherr-Ziarko on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @wolf359radio on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Alan Rodi on LinkedIn ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Zach Valenti on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Aditi Kini ’13

[Bradley Whitford '81]You’re going to see a lot more of Wesleyan trustee Bradley Whitford ’81, and not just in your inbox. Speaking of which, Wesleyan’s Giving Tuesday success was phenomenal

Anyway: Bradley Whitford replaces Rhys Ifans in Showtime’s pilot Happyish.

Happyish is a dark examination of the pursuit of happiness. Coogan stars as Thom Payne, whose new bosses are half his age. Whitford will play Jonathan, Thom’s mentor and boss who is an advertising legend whose success is due in equal parts to his creative genius and his moral cravenness. Kathryn Hahn returns to star as Thom’s wife.

Read more…

Bradley will also star in the Hank Williams biopic I Saw the Light, as the icon Fred Rose.

Whitford will play iconic songwriter and music publisher Fred Rose, who co-wrote with Williams such classic tunes as “Kaw-Liga” and “I’ll Never Get Out of This World Alive.” He also penned numerous songs recorded by other artists including the Willie Nelson hit, “Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain” and “Deed I Do,” by Sophie Tucker. With entertainer Roy Acuff, Rose formed Acuff-Rose, one of the most successful music publishing companies of all time. He was inducted, along with Williams and Jimmie Rodgers as one of the first members of the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1961.

Read more…

Image: by Oliva Drake MALS’08

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20141215-bradley-whitford

Related links

[Facebook]like Bradley Whitford on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @whitfordbradley on Twitter ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Aditi Kini ’13

[Bradley Whitford '81]You’re going to see a lot more of Wesleyan trustee Bradley Whitford ’81, and not just in your inbox. Speaking of which, Wesleyan’s Giving Tuesday success was phenomenal.

Anyway: Bradley Whitford replaces Rhys Ifans in Showtime’s pilot Happyish.

Happyish is a dark examination of the pursuit of happiness. Coogan stars as Thom Payne, whose new bosses are half his age. Whitford will play Jonathan, Thom’s mentor and boss who is an advertising legend whose success is due in equal parts to his creative genius and his moral cravenness. Kathryn Hahn returns to star as Thom’s wife.

Read more…

Bradley will also star in the Hank Williams biopic I Saw the Light, as the icon Fred Rose.

Whitford will play iconic songwriter and music publisher Fred Rose, who co-wrote with Williams such classic tunes as “Kaw-Liga” and “I’ll Never Get Out of This World Alive.” He also penned numerous songs recorded by other artists including the Willie Nelson hit, “Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain” and “Deed I Do,” by Sophie Tucker. With entertainer Roy Acuff, Rose formed Acuff-Rose, one of the most successful music publishing companies of all time. He was inducted, along with Williams and Jimmie Rodgers as one of the first members of the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1961.

Read more…

Image: by Oliva Drake MALS’08

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20141215-bradley-whitford

Related links

[Facebook]like Bradley Whitford on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @whitfordbradley on Twitter ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

Gerald Vizenor read at at the Bockley Gallery, in Minneapolis, on November 14th, where Louise Erdrich introduced him.

Vizenor then headed northwest, approximately 225 miles, to visit the White Earth Nation. On November 19th, he was a co-signer of the Constitution of the White Earth Nation. At this time, Dr. Vizenor was honored with a golden eagle feather for his service as a delegate and principal writer of the Constitution.

His latest literary works are Blue Ravens and Favor of Crows: New and Collected Haiku. Attendees of AWP 2015, in Minneapolis, can enjoy a Wesleyan sponsored panel (event F214), a “Tribute to Gerald Vizenor.” Panelists, including Heid Erdrich, Gerald Vizenor, Kimberly Blaeser, Gordon Henry, and Margaret Noodin, will discuss Dr. Vizenor’s vast body of work and reflect on how this elder statesman of Anishinaabe literature influenced and supported their own work. Vizenor’s political writing, nationalist poetry, and history-steeped novels will be represented in this tribute, fittingly held in his homeland of Minnesota. Panelists will reflect on Vizenor’s role as a mentor and teacher who enabled generations of Native writers to find their voice. The panel is on Friday, April 10th, 1:30pm – 2:45pm. Attendees can meet with Gerald at Wesleyan booth #907, after the panel, where he will sign copies of his books until 4:30pm. Favor of Crows: New and Collected Haiku will be available in paperback for the first time.

 

viz_win_2_6

Erma Vizenor, Chief of the White Earth Nation, honors Gerald Vizenor with a golden eagle feather for service as a delegate and principal writer of the Constitution of the White Earth Nation.

 

viz_wen_1_6

Gerald Vizenor signing the official documents as a delegate and principal writer of the Constitution of the White Earth Nation. The Constitution Signing was held at the White Earth Nation on November 19, 2014.

 

viz_win_minneapolis_3_6

Louise Erdrich introduces Gerald Vizenor at a reading of Blue Ravens at the Bockley Gallery in Minneapolis, November 14, 2014. This event was co-sponsored by Birchbark Books, a store operated by a spirited collection of people who believe in the power of good writing, the beauty of handmade art, the strength of Native culture, and the importance of small and intimate bookstores. Photograph, copyright John Ratzloff, 2014.

 

Reblogged from: class of 2015. (Go to the original post…)

Wesleyan University Concerto Competition || Application Deadline: February 5th, 2015

NEW!!! Large Ensemble Scholarship || Audition Deadline: February 5th, 2015

 

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)





















Students from Introduction to Environmental Studies (E&ES 197) presented their final projects Dec. 11 in Exley Science Center.

The Project Showcase involved 80 students informally presenting artists books, GIS story maps, children’s stories, fictional journals and other creative explorations.

All projects are related to environmental issues in the Connecticut River.

Read more at: http://newsletter.blogs.wesleyan.edu/2014/12/12/artbooksclass/

Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

This week’s throwback Thursday post is dedicated to director Mel Brooks! He is one of many directors interviewed in The Director Within: Storytellers of Stage and Screen by Rose Eichenbaum. The photograph of Brooks, below, is one of many images from the book.

 Eichenbaum_DirectorMel_Brooks

To honor Brooks and his ongoing ability to make us laugh long and hard, we picked a clip from his movie Spaceballs (1987).

Mel Brooks is a master of comedy. From film to theatrical productions, his work has earned him the highest honors bestowed on an entertainer: an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar, and a Tony Award—to name a few. As Brooks fans know, the filmmaker loves to spoof historic events, popular culture, books, and other films. Such parodies include Young Frankenstein, Dracula: Dead and Loving It, High Anxiety, and Spaceballs. 

When asked why he’s chosen to create so many parodies, Brooks responded:

“All I’m doing is reliving the movies I loved as a little boy. With Young Frankenstein I was reviving the gorgeous films by James Whale, Frankenstein (1931) and The Bride of Frankenstein (1935). High Anxiety is a tribute to Hitchcock. Spaceballs I made for my son, Max Brooks, who loved Star Trek and Star Wars. I dolled them up, of course, with a lot of different themes and feelings.”

Directors featured in the book The Director Within include:

• Michael Apted
• Robert Benton
• Peter Bogdanovich
• James L. Brooks
• Mel Brooks
• James Burrows
• John Carpenter
• Joseph Cedar
• Richard Donner
• Jonathan Frakes
• Lesli Linka Glatter
• Taylor Hackford
• Walter Hill
• Arthur Hiller
• Reginald Hudlin
• Doug Hughes
• Lawrence Kasdan
• John Landis
• Barry Levinson
• Rod Lurie
• Emily Mann
• Kathleen Marshall
• Rob Marshall
• Michael Mayer
• Paul Mazursky
• Mira Nair
• Hal Prince
• Brett Ratner
• Gary Ross
• Mark Rydell
• Jay Sandrich
• Susan Stroman
• Julie Taymor
• Robert Towne
• Tim Van Patten

Rose Eichenbaum will be signing copies of her books, The Director Within and The Dancer Within at Chavelier’s Books in Los Angeles this Saturday. She will be joined by performer-authors Zippora Karz and Victoria Tennant. Read more about the event and participants here.

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