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Reblogged from: Class of 2016. (Go to the original post…)

STUDENT-RUN GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP
(Sponsored by the office of Counseling and Psychological Services)
CAPS

Meets: Weekly, every Tuesday
Time: 7:00pm
Location: Solarium (Room 201) (2nd fl., Davison Health Center)

Intended to create a network of support for those who have experienced the death of a loved one. Please feel free to come and leave when it is convenient for you.

For more information please contact: jmasand@wesleyan.edu or scorner@wesleyan.edu.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

IMG_8074Wesleyan’s Environmental Organizers Network (E.O.N.) is bringing some much-needed color to campus with “Wild Walls,” a series of vertical pallet gardens that will beautify campus, bring attention to the cause of green walling, and provide students and passers-by with free herbs and flowers. The exterior of WestCo 1 currently boasts the first three panels, which have been filled with succulents and sedums as a result of their short roots and hardiness. Earlier this month, Kate Weiner ’15 – a PCSE peer advisor and grant recipient – and Ellen Paik ’16 of the Green Fund led twelve volunteers in the construction, planting, and installation of the walls, and a new student group named Wild Walls will maintain them. To get involved in upcoming projects, contact Kate at kweiner[at]wesleyan[dot]edu.

This project was made possible by months of collaboration with Kate Ten Eyck (Visiting Assistant Professor of Studio Art and Art Studio Technician), Roseann Sillasen (Associate Director of Physical Plant), Bill Nelligan (Director of Environmental Services), and Jen Kleindienst (Sustainability Coordinator), and it has been funded by Wesleyan’s Green Fund.

 

Reblogged from: Class of 2016. (Go to the original post…)

Hey Class of 2016! Come get to know your neighbors in High Rise and Low Rise and meet your classmates at the Junior Picnic! Are a lot of your friends studying abroad this semester? Come to the picnic and make new ones! There will be music, free food (BBQ-style), and lots of fun to be had! Come to the Low Rise courtyard from 1-4pm on September 20th to enjoy these last few days of summer weather with your friends and classmates.  Check out the “Junior Picnic” event on Facebook and RSVP to the Google Doc if you can make it.

Hope to see you there!

Sponsored by Hi Rise, Lo Rise, and the 2016 Class Council.

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)



















Wesleyan students, faculty, staff and community members participated in a “Freedom Summer” commemoration Sept. 12-13 on campus. he summer of 1964 saw thousands of young people — many from colleges and universities in the North – mobilize to register voters, educate citizens, and support other civil rights work in the Jim Crow South.

What came to be known as “Freedom Summer” is credited with ending the isolation of states where racial repression and discrimination was largely ignored by news media and politicians, despite the the landmark Civil Rights Act passed that July.

Wesleyan students joined the struggle. “Five Wesmen to Fight Voter Discrimination in Mississippi,” said a front-page headline in The Argus. That May, Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. had given the baccalaureate sermon, and other civil rights leaders had visited campus. The commemoration not only celebrated Wesleyan’s participation, but the unique moment Freedom Summer occupies in American history. 

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)





















The Wesleyan Student Assembly (WSA) hosted the 21st Annual Student Groups Fair Sept. 12 behind Usdan University Center.

The campus-wide event allowed both new and returning students to learn about new and established student groups, network with different academic departments and interact with several vendors from the local Middletown community. About 70 student groups were represented at the event.

Reblogged from: Green Street Blog. (Go to the original post…)

The Heart Gallery is a traveling exhibit created to find forever families for children in foster care.

   heart2

The Heart Gallery is a collaborative project of over 120 Heart Galleries across the United States designed to provide permanency for children needing homes in our community. Professional photographers have volunteered their time and talent to photograph the children in care. The Heart Gallery model is being replicated in many communities across the country. Although many of our children were removed from abusive and neglectful situations, they still have hope. They love to laugh, to learn, and to be with their friends. Most of all, they hope to find a stable home and family connection.

The CT exhibit is a collection of various photographs of children who are medically complex, have siblings or are young adolescents to older teens. These children all have one wish in common, to find a permanent connection with a family.

Opening reception will be on Thursday, October 2nd from 6-8pm

The exhibit will run from October 2- October 29, 2014

Gallery hours: Monday – Friday 9a.m.-3:00p.m.

heart

If you would like to know more about foster care and adoption program, please email: Jacqueline Ford, Heart GalleryExhibit Coordinator, jacqueline.ford@ct.gov or, you may call 1-888-KID-HERO.

 

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Aditi Kini ’13

[Bruce Eric Kaplan '87]Bruce Eric Kaplan ’87, better known as the New Yorker cartoonist BEK, is exceptionally versatile. In addition to his iconic cartoons, he has written at least ten books and worked in television – he is co-executive producer and writer for Girls, he was executive producer and writer for Six Feet Under, and wrote for Seinfeld (including the episode where Elaine – Julia Louis Dreyfus P’14 – is enraged by a cryptic New Yorker cartoon.)

Now the writer is expanding his relationship with HBO to include a half-hour comedy project Sing With Me. Both written and executive produced by Bruce, the musical will revolve around the lives of three generations of women in LA.

Writer Bruce Eric Kaplan is further expanding his relationship with HBO with a new half-hour comedy project, Sing With Me. Written and executive produced by Kaplan, the musical comedy, now in development, revolves around three generations of women living in Los Angeles. At HBO, Kaplan most recently wrote and executive produced the half-hour comedy pilot People In New Jersey. Before that Kaplan, who is also a well-known cartoonist, served as a co-executive producer on HBO’s comedy Girls and worked on drama Six Feet Under.

Read more…

Image: c/o Deadline.com

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140916-bruce-eric-kaplan

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[Twitter] follow @BruceEricKaplan on Twitter ➞

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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Aditi Kini ’13

[Zak Penn '90]Zak Penn ’90 is looking for buried videogame cartridges in the New Mexico desert at the site of the “Atari grave.” Zak, director of Atari: Game Over speaks with Re/code about his experience directing the documentary and what he wants the audience to take away.

Zak is best known as story writer for Last Action Hero, Inspector Gadget, X-Men: The Last Stand, The Avengers and directing Incident at Loch Ness about a search led by Werner Herzog.

Zak Penn went to Alamogordo, N.M., thinking he’d been hired for a 90-minute joke.

At the core of the urban legend is that one of the games buried in the desert, Howard Scott Warshaw’s game adaptation of “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial,” was so bad that it destroyed Atari’s fortunes. In a interview with Re/code, though, Penn said that’s a grand oversimplification of the truth, and reflected on the other surprises in making “Atari: Game Over,” which will be released by Xbox this fall.

What about the process of following the dig or producing the documentary was most surprising to you?

Zak Penn: Certainly, in the days leading up to it, most of my surprises were what I was discovering about the actual story. First of all, I had my own kid-like understanding of what happened to Atari, which was kind of a vague notion of somehow some stupid people destroyed this incredible company, which proved to be not true. But also, I was surprised by the level of work that had gone into figuring out where the games were and also the level of intellectual work that had gone into the games themselves. “Oh, wait. This story is upside down.”

Almost immediately, my ironic sense of humor started to drift away because I started to talk to Joe [the leader of the Atari dig], and it wasn’t just some guy who had an excavating machine and who kinda knew where he was going to dig. It was this guy who spent years doing complicated research, and he had a garage full of information. And then when I met [E.T. creator] Howard Warshaw, I realized: This guy is actually a really interesting person, period. It’s not ironic at all. There’s nothing to make fun of here. He’s got a good story to tell.

Read more…

Image: c/o Zak Penn

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140916-zak-penn

#THISISWHY

Related links

[Twitter] follow @zakpenn on Twitter ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Aditi Kini ’13

[Bruce Eric Kaplan '87]Bruce Eric Kaplan ’87, better known as the New Yorker cartoonist BEK, is exceptionally versatile. In addition to his iconic cartoons, he has written at least ten books and worked in television – he is co-executive producer and writer for Girls, he was executive producer and writer for Six Feet Under, and wrote for Seinfeld (including the episode where Elaine – Julia Louis Dreyfus P’14 – is enraged by a cryptic New Yorker cartoon.)

Now the writer is expanding his relationship with HBO to include a half-hour comedy project Sing With Me. Both written and executive produced by Bruce, the musical will revolve around the lives of three generations of women in LA.

Writer Bruce Eric Kaplan is further expanding his relationship with HBO with a new half-hour comedy project, Sing With Me. Written and executive produced by Kaplan, the musical comedy, now in development, revolves around three generations of women living in Los Angeles. At HBO, Kaplan most recently wrote and executive produced the half-hour comedy pilot People In New Jersey. Before that Kaplan, who is also a well-known cartoonist, served as a co-executive producer on HBO’s comedy Girls and worked on drama Six Feet Under.

Read more…

Image: c/o Deadline.com

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140916-bruce-eric-kaplan

Related links

[Twitter] follow @BruceEricKaplan on Twitter ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Aditi Kini ’13

[Zak Penn '90]Zak Penn ’90 is looking for buried videogame cartridges in the New Mexico desert at the site of the “Atari grave.” Zak, director of Atari: Game Over speaks with Re/code about his experience directing the documentary and what he wants the audience to take away.

Zak is best known as story writer for Last Action Hero, Inspector Gadget, X-Men: The Last Stand, The Avengers and directing Incident at Loch Ness about a search led by Werner Herzog.

Zak Penn went to Alamogordo, N.M., thinking he’d been hired for a 90-minute joke.

At the core of the urban legend is that one of the games buried in the desert, Howard Scott Warshaw’s game adaptation of “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial,” was so bad that it destroyed Atari’s fortunes. In a interview with Re/code, though, Penn said that’s a grand oversimplification of the truth, and reflected on the other surprises in making “Atari: Game Over,” which will be released by Xbox this fall.

What about the process of following the dig or producing the documentary was most surprising to you?

Zak Penn: Certainly, in the days leading up to it, most of my surprises were what I was discovering about the actual story. First of all, I had my own kid-like understanding of what happened to Atari, which was kind of a vague notion of somehow some stupid people destroyed this incredible company, which proved to be not true. But also, I was surprised by the level of work that had gone into figuring out where the games were and also the level of intellectual work that had gone into the games themselves. “Oh, wait. This story is upside down.”

Almost immediately, my ironic sense of humor started to drift away because I started to talk to Joe [the leader of the Atari dig], and it wasn’t just some guy who had an excavating machine and who kinda knew where he was going to dig. It was this guy who spent years doing complicated research, and he had a garage full of information. And then when I met [E.T. creator] Howard Warshaw, I realized: This guy is actually a really interesting person, period. It’s not ironic at all. There’s nothing to make fun of here. He’s got a good story to tell.

Read more…

Image: c/o Zak Penn

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140916-zak-penn

#THISISWHY

Related links

[Twitter] follow @zakpenn on Twitter ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

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