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Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

We are pleased to announce a new book by Julia Byl, Antiphonal Histories: Resonant Pasts in the Toba Batak Musical Present.

byl blog

 

“Well-written, smart, and honest, Antiphonal Histories is an innovative juxtaposition of historiography, ethnography, musical analysis, and reflexive autobiography. There are also moments of poignant insight, brilliant induction, and hilarity.” —Jeremy Wallach, author of Modern Noise, Fluid Genres: Popular Music in Indonesia, 1997–2001

Positioned on a major trade route, the Toba Batak people of Sumatra have long witnessed the ebb and flow of cultural influence from India, the Middle East, and the West. Living as ethnic and religious minorities within modern Indonesia, Tobas have recast this history of difference through interpretations meant to strengthen or efface the identities it has shaped. Antiphonal Histories examines Toba musical performance as a legacy of global history, and a vital expression of local experience. This intriguingly constructed ethnography searches the palm liquor stand and the sanctuary to show how Toba performance manifests its many histories through its “local music”—Lutheran brass band hymns, gong-chime music sacred to Shiva, and Jimmie Rodgers yodeling. Combining vivid narrative, wide-ranging historical research, and personal reflections, Antiphonal Histories traces the musical trajectories of the past to show us how the global is manifest in the performative moment.

byl collage

Clockwise from top left: a group of men playing at the lapo tuak; ceremonial dancing at a Toba adat ceremony; Martahan Sitohang playing the Toba suling during a performance residency in the Netherlands (photo: Hardoni Sitohang); and a gondang group.

For more details, click here.

Also available as an ebook—check with your favorite ebook retailer.

Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

We are pleased to announce the release of a brand-new edition of The American Shore: Meditations on a Tale of Science Fiction by Thomas M. Disch —- “Angouleme,” with an introduction by Matthew Cheney.

 american shore

A keystone text in literary theory and science fiction The American Shore: Meditations on a Tale of Science Fiction by Thomas M. Disch—“Angouleme” was first published in 1978 to the intense interest of science fiction readers and the growing community of SF scholars. Recalling Nabokov’s commentary on Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin, Roland Barthes’ commentary on Balzac’s Sarazine, and Grabinier’s reading of The Heart of Hamlet, this book-length essay helped prove the genre worthy of serious investigation. The American Shore is the third in a series of influential critical works by Samuel Delany, beginning with The Jewel-Hinged Jaw and Starboard Wine, first published in the late seventies and reissued over the last five years by Wesleyan University Press. Delany was honored with a Pilgrim Award for Science Fiction Scholarship from the Science Fiction Research Association of America. He has also received the Hugo Award, Nebula Award, and the William Whitehead Memorial Award for a lifetime’s contribution to gay and lesbian literature. In 2013, he was named the 31st Damon Knight Memorial Foundation Grand Master by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. This edition of The American Shore includes the author’s corrected text as well as a new introduction by Delany scholar Matthew Cheney. For more details, click here. Also available as an ebook—check with your favorite ebook retailer.

Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

This week’s Throwback Thursday selection is Andrea Werblin’s “Arguing in Public,” from Lullaby for One Fist (2001).

.

werblin TBT

.

.

Arguing in Public

Any plastic flower’s lame reach to heaven is any Dos Equis’
knowledge of terror,
so you go a few rounds of proving emphatically nothing,
grow up prickly and worn
before you’ve gotten a chance to rotten each other the long way.
Couples of this taquería,
I could use you being happier if you wouldn’t mind it,
because the heater emits only flowers
of heat, and the birds caught in the air ducts are shrieking
like his best afternoon
of locking me out and calling the police, & the police laughing.
May you never again call each other jerkass
in a car on a Saturday morning,
while your love and hate deprivatize.
May your foolhearted means
of courting what is over be over now. Structureless as you are,
try thanking your respective bellies
for being potlike, the winter’s weird fingers for a fury
more gracile than all your years alone.

.

.

ANDREA WERBLIN has had poetry published in various print and online journals, including BOOG Reader, EOAGH: A Journal of the Arts, The Massachusetts Review, and Smartish Pace. She has a B.A. from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and an MFA in creative writing from the University of Arizona, Tucson. She currently works as a Creative Director in the Boston area.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Lucas Guilkey '10]
By Aditi Kini ’13

In an interview with Wesconnect, Lucas Guilkey ’10 talks about Dying for Sunlight – a documentary highlighting the horror of indefinite solitary confinement in American prisons. The documentary focuses on the California prisoner hunger strikes, where an “inspiring humanity has arisen out of these conditions of torture: a massive, non-violent civil disobedience for basic human rights.”

The Indiegogo campaign for Dying for Sunlight ends at midnight on Thursday, July 17.

WESCONNECT: You’re currently working on a documentary film on prisoner-led movements against the “living tomb” of indefinite solitary confinement. Where did you get this idea?

LUCAS GUILKEY: Having grown up as a white kid in a privileged, upper-class community, I was always on track to go to college, never to prison as so many working class youth and youth of color are. In high school and Wesleyan, I became politicalized around the issues of systemic racism and white privilege, as my eyes became opened to these parallel universes.

I’ve learned since then that the most effective and powerful movements for social change are led by those most directly impacted. So when 30,000 prisoners in California–one quarter of all state prisoners–went on a coordinated hunger strike last summer against the use of indefinite solitary confinement and in defense of their own humanity, I couldn’t sit idly by.

California incarcerates around 12,000 people in solitary confinement on any given day, and around 3,000 of those are locked in indefinite solitary confinement. In Pelican Bay State Prison, men are isolated in concrete, windowless cells called Security Housing Units (or SHUs) for 22.5 hours a day for up to decades at time. Shane Bauer’s Mother Jones article (Solitary in Iran Nearly Broke Me. Then I Went Inside America’s Prisons) extensively documents that it is flimsy evidence–tattoos, christmas cards, political literature, cultural symbols, and confidential informants–not crimes, that land someone in the SHU indefinitely.

Thousands of prisoners had resorted to killing themselves for basic human rights. I witnessed the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition working tirelessly to amplify their message, but the hunger strikes received relatively little media coverage, especially after the early days of the hunger strike.

I am drawn to this story not only to expose the deep injustices operating in California prisons, but because I am inspired by the humanity that has arisen out of these conditions of torture: a massive, non-violent civil disobedience for basic human rights. As Arturo Castellanos wrote from the SHU, “We prisoners of all races have united to force these changes for future generations.”

I’ve also met countless family members of these SHU prisoners who’ve shared their stories of overcoming their own conditions of isolation and shame. After years of pain, depression, and confusion about having a loved one locked in solitary, they began meeting each other at meetings, rallies, and visits to the prisons. Today they’ve become a powerful political force and the heart and soul of the movement to end indefinite isolation. “My son is a part of me,” told me recently. “Whatever happens to him happens to me.”

These stories of hope in seemingly hopeless situations are of incredible importance to me as we attempt to chart a path out of the major social, political, economic, and environmental crises of our time. As we confront the surveillance state, global warming, and massive economic inequality, I believe we must first be grounded in the ability to recognize the humanity in ourselves and in each other.

WC: Various depictions of prison life in the media (The Farm (1998), and at the moment in popular television – Orange is the New Black) have cultivated the public’s interest in life in prison. How do you see media – and your documentary, in particular – affecting prison reform?

LUCAS: We incarcerate more of our own people than any other country on earth, and this system is largely maintained through the dehumanizing and silencing of people who are incarcerated. In California, for example, reporters have been banned since 1996 from entering prisons without prison officials controlling their visit. Not until 2011, after the first hunger strike, were SHU prisoners even allowed to take a photo of themselves. Therefore, humanizing prisoners in the public sphere is the first step. We’ve seen the the documentary film The House I Live In change the game on the drug war. We’ve seen Solitary Nation from Frontline shine light on the horrors of solitary in Maine. And we’ve seen Orange is the New Black, while fiction, demonstrate to a mainstream audience that prisoners on the inside are just as complicated, flawed human beings as those of us on the outside. These examples show how media and film can shift culture about things we think are inevitable.

For us, we want to show that prisoners voices are at the center of a movement to decarcerate our society–that is, reduce the logic that has us putting more and more people in more and more repressive conditions of confinement. We want to highlight the experiential knowledge of those who’ve endured solitary confinement, and those who’ve endured having their family members locked in solitary confinement. By interweaving their stories with at the analyses of psychologists, historians, and others who’ve studied this system from a big picture perspective we hope to create a well-rounded film that will go to the heart of the question, “What if it was yourself or your family member that was locked in solitary?” and “How did we get to where we are today?”

There is a strong movement to end solitary, and we hope this film will contribute to ending long-term isolation. Furthermore, we see ourselves as part of a larger social movement advocating for a system based on public health, public education, and rehabilitation, not human warehousing. As a sister of someone in the SHU recently said, “You can’t teach someone to do good by torturing them.”

WC: Were there any classes or activities at Wes in particular that furthered your interest in prisoner rights, and human rights globally?

LUCAS: Wesleyan is where I became politicized and gained my tools to analyze and engage with the world. As an anthropology major, I learned to interweave structural analysis of our political and economic systems with engaging individual (including self-reflexive) narratives, and this has informed all of my documentary film work. Anu Sharma’s class “Anthropology and Political Economy” gave me the foundation for the neoliberal period, which undergirded the rise of mass incarceration in the U.S. Jonathan Cutler’s “Paternalism and Social Power” allowed me to think deeply about the role of privilege and power in social movements. And Demetrius Eudell’s strong emphasis on reimagining the human being in the context of neoliberal capitalism, chattel slavery, and the foundation of the the United States influences everything I do today. And those are just a few of my formative moments! I also wouldn’t want to forget the long history of anti-racism and anti-war activism at Wesleyan that is near and dear to my heart.

WC: Any memories of Wes that stand out?

LUCAS: Trying to get the Board of Trustees to divest from weapons companies profiting off of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. We didn’t win, but we raised awareness, got a socially responsible investment committee formed, and learned a lot about the nature of power and how to build effective social movements. That and all the beautiful, intelligent people I got to hang with everyday!

Support “Dying for Sunlight” on Indiegogo…

Image: c/o Lucas Guilkey

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140716-lucas-guilkey

Related links

[Facebook]Lucas Guilkey on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @4amnotes on Twitter ➞

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Lucas Guilkey '10]
By Aditi Kini ’13

In an interview with Wesconnect, Lucas Guilkey ’10 talks about Dying for Sunlight – a documentary highlighting the horror of indefinite solitary confinement in American prisons. The documentary focuses on the California prisoner hunger strikes, where an “inspiring humanity has arisen out of these conditions of torture: a massive, non-violent civil disobedience for basic human rights.”

The Indiegogo campaign for Dying for Sunlight ends at midnight on Thursday, July 17.

WESCONNECT: You’re currently working on a documentary film on prisoner-led movements against the “living tomb” of indefinite solitary confinement. Where did you get this idea?

LUCAS GUILKEY: Having grown up as a white kid in a privileged, upper-class community, I was always on track to go to college, never to prison as so many working class youth and youth of color are. In high school and Wesleyan, I became politicalized around the issues of systemic racism and white privilege, as my eyes became opened to these parallel universes.

I’ve learned since then that the most effective and powerful movements for social change are led by those most directly impacted. So when 30,000 prisoners in California–one quarter of all state prisoners–went on a coordinated hunger strike last summer against the use of indefinite solitary confinement and in defense of their own humanity, I couldn’t sit idly by.

California incarcerates around 12,000 people in solitary confinement on any given day, and around 3,000 of those are locked in indefinite solitary confinement. In Pelican Bay State Prison, men are isolated in concrete, windowless cells called Security Housing Units (or SHUs) for 22.5 hours a day for up to decades at time. Shane Bauer’s Mother Jones article (Solitary in Iran Nearly Broke Me. Then I Went Inside America’s Prisons) extensively documents that it is flimsy evidence–tattoos, christmas cards, political literature, cultural symbols, and confidential informants–not crimes, that land someone in the SHU indefinitely.

Thousands of prisoners had resorted to killing themselves for basic human rights. I witnessed the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition working tirelessly to amplify their message, but the hunger strikes received relatively little media coverage, especially after the early days of the hunger strike.

I am drawn to this story not only to expose the deep injustices operating in California prisons, but because I am inspired by the humanity that has arisen out of these conditions of torture: a massive, non-violent civil disobedience for basic human rights. As Arturo Castellanos wrote from the SHU, “We prisoners of all races have united to force these changes for future generations.”

I’ve also met countless family members of these SHU prisoners who’ve shared their stories of overcoming their own conditions of isolation and shame. After years of pain, depression, and confusion about having a loved one locked in solitary, they began meeting each other at meetings, rallies, and visits to the prisons. Today they’ve become a powerful political force and the heart and soul of the movement to end indefinite isolation. “My son is a part of me,” told me recently. “Whatever happens to him happens to me.”

These stories of hope in seemingly hopeless situations are of incredible importance to me as we attempt to chart a path out of the major social, political, economic, and environmental crises of our time. As we confront the surveillance state, global warming, and massive economic inequality, I believe we must first be grounded in the ability to recognize the humanity in ourselves and in each other.

WC: Various depictions of prison life in the media (The Farm (1998), and at the moment in popular television – Orange is the New Black) have cultivated the public’s interest in life in prison. How do you see media – and your documentary, in particular – affecting prison reform?

LUCAS: We incarcerate more of our own people than any other country on earth, and this system is largely maintained through the dehumanizing and silencing of people who are incarcerated. In California, for example, reporters have been banned since 1996 from entering prisons without prison officials controlling their visit. Not until 2011, after the first hunger strike, were SHU prisoners even allowed to take a photo of themselves. Therefore, humanizing prisoners in the public sphere is the first step. We’ve seen the the documentary film The House I Live In change the game on the drug war. We’ve seen Solitary Nation from Frontline shine light on the horrors of solitary in Maine. And we’ve seen Orange is the New Black, while fiction, demonstrate to a mainstream audience that prisoners on the inside are just as complicated, flawed human beings as those of us on the outside. These examples show how media and film can shift culture about things we think are inevitable.

For us, we want to show that prisoners voices are at the center of a movement to decarcerate our society–that is, reduce the logic that has us putting more and more people in more and more repressive conditions of confinement. We want to highlight the experiential knowledge of those who’ve endured solitary confinement, and those who’ve endured having their family members locked in solitary confinement. By interweaving their stories with at the analyses of psychologists, historians, and others who’ve studied this system from a big picture perspective we hope to create a well-rounded film that will go to the heart of the question, “What if it was yourself or your family member that was locked in solitary?” and “How did we get to where we are today?”

There is a strong movement to end solitary, and we hope this film will contribute to ending long-term isolation. Furthermore, we see ourselves as part of a larger social movement advocating for a system based on public health, public education, and rehabilitation, not human warehousing. As a sister of someone in the SHU recently said, “You can’t teach someone to do good by torturing them.”

WC: Were there any classes or activities at Wes in particular that furthered your interest in prisoner rights, and human rights globally?

LUCAS: Wesleyan is where I became politicized and gained my tools to analyze and engage with the world. As an anthropology major, I learned to interweave structural analysis of our political and economic systems with engaging individual (including self-reflexive) narratives, and this has informed all of my documentary film work. Anu Sharma’s class “Anthropology and Political Economy” gave me the foundation for the neoliberal period, which undergirded the rise of mass incarceration in the U.S. Jonathan Cutler’s “Paternalism and Social Power” allowed me to think deeply about the role of privilege and power in social movements. And Demetrius Eudell’s strong emphasis on reimagining the human being in the context of neoliberal capitalism, chattel slavery, and the foundation of the the United States influences everything I do today. And those are just a few of my formative moments! I also wouldn’t want to forget the long history of anti-racism and anti-war activism at Wesleyan that is near and dear to my heart.

WC: Any memories of Wes that stand out?

LUCAS: Trying to get the Board of Trustees to divest from weapons companies profiting off of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. We didn’t win, but we raised awareness, got a socially responsible investment committee formed, and learned a lot about the nature of power and how to build effective social movements. That and all the beautiful, intelligent people I got to hang with everyday!

Support “Dying for Sunlight” on Indiegogo…

Image: c/o Lucas Guilkey

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140716-lucas-guilkey

Related links

[Facebook]Lucas Guilkey on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @4amnotes on Twitter ➞

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Jake Eichengreen '13 and Frank Fineis '13]
By Aditi Kini ’13

In this interview with Wesconnect, Jacob Eichengreen ’13 and Frank Fineis ’13 talk about translating the intellectual work of a senior thesis into reality with Bloom Financial, a microcredit startup that fosters peer-to-peer lending in Uganda.

Bloom Financial is in the running to win Venture for America’s Innnovation Fund crowdfunding competition, which allots an additional $10k to the winner.

Jake and Frank talk about the inception of their startup, launching Espwesso and boxing club, and how Usdan never really had vanilla soft serve:

WESCONNECT: What are your roles at Bloom Financial? How do you see this project taking off?

JAKE EICHENGREEN: Our roles are pretty equal right now at Bloom, as we’re so focused on this crowdfunding campaign and laying the foundation for the project to grow. We’re planning on a purposeful take-off as things become ready. Initially, we will be building our team and network in Uganda, identifying communities and players that are particularly good fits for what we’re doing. Once that happens we’ll grant the first few loans and work carefully with the borrowers to improve our processes and the guidance we give both lenders and borrowers. As we move out of the fundraising focus, my role will shift to a more traditional CEO role, and Franks will become what most people call a COO – his current graduate work and experience is perfect for operating our peer-to-peer lending platform, and he’s much more interested in the technical side of things. Building the tech is going to be a key piece of our trajectory.

WC: On a similar note, this microcredit institution grew out of an honors thesis. How did you translate the thesis into reality?

JAKE: That’s an awesome question. I researched this opportunity first through a SIT summer study abroad program in Uganda and Rwanda, and then again on an independent, Davenport grant-funded research trip back to Uganda during my junior summer. It ultimately turned into my thesis. In my research, I repeatedly came across intellectual works that prescribed solutions to many development problems, but rarely actually were translated into action. I wanted to break that pattern and actually put my research to use outside the University. I was interested in Venture for America following graduation because I saw it as an awesome opportunity to gain the skills and experience in building startups to ultimately realize the vision of the thesis.

I’m currently in Las Vegas, working hard to launch SHIFT and revolutionize urban transportation. Watching Downtown Las Vegas – and the dozens of startups here – evolve and develop over my first year of the fellowship has been incredibly inspiring and motivated me to start moving forward with Bloom Financial. I started working with several local and national players to begin much of the preliminary work for this – legal research, business plans, and solid mentors. Bloom is still in an incredibly early stage, but everything I’ve gained (and will continue to gain) through my fellowship and my time here in Las Vegas will continue to push this thing forward.

Frank and I were housemates senior year, and close friends for most of our time at Wes. We spent many hours (usually while Frank was brushing his teeth) talking through my ideas for this, and he always had suggestions for ways to make my arguments stronger and my thinking more sound. Now that we’re actually building, he has the technical skillset to compliment my experience on the ground.

WC: How did you begin working in development? What are your future career goals?

JAKE: I actually first experienced development work as part of a group of Wesleyan students who went to Haiti following the 2010 earthquake my Freshman year. I was overwhelmed by my experience there; what I had initially thought was a ‘warm fuzzy’ that the developed world does for the developing world – international aid – turned out to be a quagmire of politics, egos, conflicting motives, and more. I became fascinated by the global development world, and wanted to dive in. The whole field is full of incredibly fascinating and complex problems that, if approached properly, present real opportunities to meaningfully improve the lives of millions. I love it. As I mentioned, I spent the next two summers digging deeper and researching. My dream would be for this project to become my my career goal… it will take a lot of hard work to get it there. Work that I’m genuinely excited about doing.

FRANK FINEIS: I lived in West Virginia for the first few months after graduation, working on clean energy projects. Building an oasis of sustainability in the middle of the coalfields was a really challenging and rewarding opportunity. We brought new jobs to folks in the area, but also saw long-engrained ways of life disrupted by moves away from coal. This project is really a transformation of that kind of development work to a bigger stage. It’s an opportunity to promote innovation and develop new ways of conducting business and engaging in an economy while still being conscious of the cultural transformation that such development undoubtedly will bring.

WC: What kind of classes/activities at Wesleyan helped in the formation of this startup – and in your personal approach towards social entrepreneurship?

JAKE: Several, actually. I was a CSS student and found so much relevant information in all of my classes in the major. Understanding the intersections between history, government, and economics as they pertain to development helped me develop a much deeper and broader connection to the issues Bloom is trying to tackle. And, so much of the work in CSS is self-motivated – obviously a huge boon to a project like this. Additionally, I took Joy Anderson’s Money and Social Change my senior year which challenged my notions of how to use money to achieve social change. Finally, I helped build Espwesso – the student run cafe down in Allbritton. I was one of the first baristas hired before it opened, and became manager my junior year – its second year of existence. In my 2 years managing, we more than doubled income and became financially sustainable. Less than 5% of cafes nationally are profitable on coffee sales alone. Not only is Espwesso profitable on coffee sales, it has become a campus staple.

FRANK: I took a class on Labor Economics that shaped my thinking on this. The professor was very careful to point out how the Econ 101 supply/demand model that is so often touted really falls flat in the face of the nuanced complexity of an economy. Economic health is so much more than supply and demand. Health, happiness, culture all have a tangible impact on economic health and vitality. I’m really taking that to heart through this project.

WC: Any memories of Wesleyan that stand out?

FRANK: Launching boxing club. I launched boxing club my senior year and watching it take off was awesome. Seeing myself do something outside of the classroom that is reflective of who I am was really something I’ll never forget. It was the first time I really made something mine and took charge of doing things outside the classroom; it’s a bit smaller scale than what we’re working on now, but it will stay with me for a long time.

JAKE: So many things – if I had to sum it up, though, it would be the community. Being at Wesleyan helped me understand the true power of a tight, deep-rooted community. It’s a big part of what keeps me working to build community vitality wherever I go. Also, there was never any vanilla soft serve at Usdan when I’d get dinner. They should work on that.

Support Bloom Financial by August 4…

Image: c/o of Jacob Eichengreen and Frank Fineis

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140716-eichengreen-fineis

#THISISWHY

Related links

[Twitter] follow @Jeichengreen on Twitter ➞

[Twitter] follow @bigdillinger on Twitter ➞

Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

We are pleased to announce a new book by Michael Jarrett, Producing Country: The Inside Story of the Great Recordings.

 

 Jarrett - Producing R-300-3

“…you would look long and hard to find a more readable contribution to the cultural studies, or country music, canon.” Tim Holmes, Record Collector magazine

Musicians make music. Producers make records. In the early days of recorded music, the producer was the “artists-and-repertoire man,” or A&R man, for short. A powerful figure, the A&R man chose both who would record and what they would record. His decisions profoundly shaped our musical tastes. Don Law found country bluesman Robert Johnson and honky-tonk crooner Lefty Frizzell. Cowboy Jack Clement took the initiative to record Jerry Lee Lewis (while his boss, Sam Phillips, was away on business). When Ray Charles said he wanted to record a country-and-western album, Sid Feller gathered songs for his consideration. The author’s extensive interviews with music makers offer the fullest account ever of the producer’s role in creating country music. In its focus on recordings and record production, Producing Country tells the story of country music from its early years to the present day through hit records by Hank Williams, George Jones, Patsy Cline, Buck Owens, Dolly Parton, Johnny Cash, Loretta Lynn, Waylon Jennings, Merle Haggard, and more.

 

gallery 01

Chet Atkins and engineer Bill Porter in RCA Studio B, Nashville. Courtesy of Merle Atkins Russell, the Chet Atkins Estate

Producing Country includes original interviews with producers Chet Atkins, Pete Anderson, Jimmy Bowen, Bobby Braddock, Harold Bradley, Tony Brown, Blake Chancey, Jack Clement, Scott Hendricks, Bob Johnston, Jerry Kennedy, Blake Mevis, Ken Nelson, Jim Ed Norman, Allen Reynolds, Jim Rooney, James Stroud, Paul Worley, and Reggie Young, among others.

For more details, click here.

Also available as an ebook—check with your favorite ebook retailer.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Katey Rich '06]
By Caroline MacNeille ’16

Harry Potter fans around the world are rejoicing. On the fan website Pottermore, J.K. Rowling has released a short story that catches up with the beloved wizards at the wizarding World Cup. Katey Rich ’06, editor of Vanity Fair‘s Hollywood, reports on the gossip update that everyone is talking about:

While you’ve been paying attention to the Muggle World Cup happening in Brazil, a far more magical, and we daresay important, sporting competition has been happening in the Patagonian desert. At Pottermore, at least, it is time again for the Quidditch World Cup. The official Harry Potter fan site/online experience has been publishing dispatches from the Cup written by Ginny Potter (née Weasley), but today’s entry is something special— a gossip update, written by J.K. Rowling in the voice of Rita Skeeter, and giving us vague updates on what Harry, Ron, Hermione, and the rest of Dumbledore’s Army have been up to as adults.

Brace yourselves— Harry is almost 34 years old, with “threads of silver” in his hair, but still a little mysterious thanks to his career as a top-secret auror, which leaves him with a suspicious cut on his cheekbone. He’s also still a celebrity— Skeeter describes rumors of his arrival with “excitement beyond anything seen yet,” even leading to a crowd stampede.

You have to be a Pottermore member to read the story, and we confess, the login process takes forever and the link that contains the story has been overloaded all morning— meaning we’re not the only ones who will eagerly jump on whichever Potter crumbs Rowling is willing to give us.

Read more…

Image: c/o Alliance of Women Film Journalists

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140715-Katey-Rich

Related links

[Facebook]Katey Rich on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @KateyRich on Twitter ➞

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Katey Rich '06]
By Caroline MacNeille ’16

Harry Potter fans around the world are rejoicing. On the fan website Pottermore, J.K. Rowling has released a short story that catches up with the beloved wizards at the wizarding World Cup. Katey Rich ’06, editor of Vanity Fair‘s Hollywood, reports on the gossip update that everyone is talking about:

While you’ve been paying attention to the Muggle World Cup happening in Brazil, a far more magical, and we daresay important, sporting competition has been happening in the Patagonian desert. At Pottermore, at least, it is time again for the Quidditch World Cup. The official Harry Potter fan site/online experience has been publishing dispatches from the Cup written by Ginny Potter (née Weasley), but today’s entry is something special— a gossip update, written by J.K. Rowling in the voice of Rita Skeeter, and giving us vague updates on what Harry, Ron, Hermione, and the rest of Dumbledore’s Army have been up to as adults.

Brace yourselves— Harry is almost 34 years old, with “threads of silver” in his hair, but still a little mysterious thanks to his career as a top-secret auror, which leaves him with a suspicious cut on his cheekbone. He’s also still a celebrity— Skeeter describes rumors of his arrival with “excitement beyond anything seen yet,” even leading to a crowd stampede.

You have to be a Pottermore member to read the story, and we confess, the login process takes forever and the link that contains the story has been overloaded all morning— meaning we’re not the only ones who will eagerly jump on whichever Potter crumbs Rowling is willing to give us.

Read more…

Image: c/o Alliance of Women Film Journalists

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140715-Katey-Rich

Related links

[Facebook]Katey Rich on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @KateyRich on Twitter ➞

Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

Janet Collins, renowned dancer, painter, and the first African-American soloist ballerina to appear at the Metropolitan Opera, remains largely under-recognized. Actress and mother Karyn Parsons, who played Hilary Banks in The Fresh Prince of Bel Air, hopes to remedy this by sharing Collins’ story with those to whom it might be most important—children.

 

larger collage

 

Karyn created a Kickstarter campaign, which closes on July 18th, to fund the project. Donors will receive all manner of exciting prizes. There are signed posters, photographs, and books; chances to have a voicemail message recorded by Chris Rock or Jada Pinkett Smith; even opportunities to meet Rock or members of the cast of The Fresh Prince of Bel Air.

You can also select Welseyan’s book on Janet Collins, Night’s Dancer: The Life of Janet Collins by Yaël Tamar Lewin. As Collins wrote in her unfinished memoir, included in Night’s Dancer, her life was full of  “great thrills—and great chills.” Janet was born in 1917 to a poor but educated family in New Orleans. The family moved to Los Angeles soon after her birth, as her mother wanted to live in a place where her children “could go anywhere they wanted to, particularly the library.”

Janet’s talents became apparent at a young age, but as a black woman in the entirely white world of dance, she faced prejudice. At age fifteen she was offered a spot in the prestigious company Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, but only if she agreed to perform in whiteface. She refused. Later, she was unable to tour in the Jim Crow South.

Collins went on to star in Aida and Carmen, and eventually graced the stage of the Metropolitan Opera, its first black prima ballerina. Since then, she has been widely recognized as one of the finest dancers in America. Her artistic and personal influences continue to shape the dance world today.

It’s an important story, one that is sure to inspire todays young people. Visit the Kickstarter page to contribute. The campaign has garnered attention from BETThe Guardian, and NPR.

Photo credits, all found in Night’s Dancer: 1 & 2: Collins in Spirituals. Photo @ Dennis Stock/Magnum Photos. Courtesy of the Jerome Robbins Dance Division, The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts. 3: Painting of a young girl by Collins. Courtesy of the estate of Janet Collins. 4: Painting of a woman with magnolias by Collins. Courtesy of the estate of Janet Collins. 5: Collins with Hanya Holm, Don Redlick, and Elizabeth Harris, 1961. Photo by Bob McIntyre. Courtesy of Don Redlich. 6: Collins surrounded by her art. Betty Udesen/The Seattle Times.

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