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Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)











International students, Residential Life student staff and graduate students are trickling onto campus, Aug. 26. 

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

The Green Street Art Center hosts many exciting programs and events throughout the year – Web Design courses, Capoeira, Preschool music classes, you name it! – and they’re looking for a student intern to make sure that everyone on campus and around town knows about all the fun things they have to offer.

Students who participate in this unpaid internship can receive .25 academic credits through CSPL493.

Intern responsibilities include:
- Design easy-to-edit flyers for program promotion
- Post flyers around campus and downtown
- Design monthly calendar for promotion
- Share program and event information online
- Assist in managing social media – Facebook and Twitter (familiarity with TweetDeck a plus)
- Assist with website management, updates
- Write regular stories about Green Street programs for our blog, interviews with students, artists, etc.
- Photograph and record events as needed

Skills required:
- Microsoft Office
- WordPress
- Cascade (preferred, can provide training)
- Facebook, Twitter, TweetDeck (preferred)
Interns are welcome to use the Green Street computer labs when they’re available, but it would be best if the student has access to his or her own laptop.

To apply:
- Send a cover letter, resume, and writing sample to the Green Street Director, Sara MacSorley at smacsorley[at]wesleyan[dot]edu. You may also include samples of event photographs and/or videos.
- Submit a cover letter, resume, and writing sample through the Career Drive listing
The deadline to apply is September 12, 2014.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

What role could enterprise play in ending poverty around the world? How do companies in developing countries overcome obstacles to scaling their ventures and alleviating poverty? If you are interested in researching and writing on these pressing questions, consider collaborating with professors and classmates in the 2015 NextBillion Case Writing Competition. There are cash prizes for first, second, and third place entries, which will be published alongside two honorable mentions in GlobaLens, a case study publisher at the University of Michigan.

Individuals or teams that include at least one professor may submit case studies related to social enterprise or a Base-of-the-Pyramid (BoP) issue. More specifically, entries should describe strategies for BoP companies who face challenges as they create and sustain their businesses. Entries must include adequate information from primary and secondary sources, a 150-word abstract, and a comprehensive teaching note. One professor per entry must agree to teach the case in a course if selected as a winner.  Read the rest of the entry requirements here. Entry forms are due on October 10 and submission documents on December 19. Winners will be announced on April 3, 2015.

 

Reblogged from: Green Street Blog. (Go to the original post…)

We are looking for a student intern who can help us better promote our fantastic programs and events. We want to make sure everyone on campus and downtown knows about the cool stuff we’re up to at Green Street and we need some help to do that. Applicants must be strong communicators in person and in writing, self-motivated, and outgoing.

Students are welcome to use our computer labs to work as long as they are available. It would be best to have a student who is able to work from his or her own laptop either at Green Street or off-site.

Responsibilities include:

  • Design easy-to-edit flyers for program promotion
  • Post flyers around campus and downtown
  • Design monthly calendar for promotion
  • Share program and event information online
  • Assist in managing social media – Facebook and Twitter (familiarity with TweetDeck a plus)
  • Assist with website management, updates
  • Write regular stories about Green Street programs for our blog, interviews with students, artists, etc.
  • Photograph and record events as needed

Skills required:

  • Microsoft Office
  • WordPress
  • Cascade (preferred, can provide training)
  • Facebook, Twitter, TweetDeck (preferred)

Please email Green Street Director, Sara MacSorley at smacsorley@wesleyan.edu if you’re interested with a copy of your resume, a cover letter, and a writing sample. You can also send samples of event photographs and/or videos. This is an unpaid internship but students can receive .25 academic credits through CSPL493.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Politically active students often focus on state, national, and international affairs, yet much of the governance that influences our day-to-day lives happens on the local level, right under our very noses. The new internships with the City of Middletown will allow Wesleyan students and alumni to observe and assist with the daily activities of departments whose work directly affects the community. This is an ideal opportunity for anyone looking to test the waters of public service and to gain hands-on experience in their field.

Students who participate in this unpaid internship can receive .25 academic credits through CSPL493

From Joseph Samolis, Chief of Staff:
You’re investing a lot in your education: Why not invest some in yourself? With an internship or externship at the City of Middletown, we help you gain practical experience in your field of study. An opportunity at the City of Middletown will give you a chance to take what you have learned in the classroom and apply it to a local community. Not only will you benefit from the experience by learning practical applications of your field of study, the citizens of Middletown gain from your help, drive and fresh perspectives in our various departments.”

Municipal Departments:
- Mayor’s Office (Creating public policies that benefit the local community)
- Public Works (Construction Projects)
- Planning, Conservation and Development (Environmental Review, Economic Development, Zoning Enforcement)
-  Information Technology (IT Infrastructure projects, connecting public to resources they need)
- Office of General Counsel (City Attorney’s Office)
- Public Safety (Police/Fire/Emergency Management)
- Recreation and Community Services (Public Programming, Senior Services, Recreation)
Department placement will depend on student’s research interests.

To apply:
- Complete the Student Internship application and submit to the Human Resources Division with a resume and cover letter stating your field of study, intended career path, and motivation for interning.
- Submit your resume and cover letter again through Career Drive.

The deadline to apply is October 17, 2014. For more information, contact Joseph Samolis at joseph.samolis[at]middletownct[dot]gov.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

There is rarely a dull moment at Wesleyan – especially inside the Allbritton Center - and with so much activity happening right here on campus, it’s easy to overlook opportunities to learn outside of the Wes bubble. Throughout the year and around the world, there are countless conferences, institutes, bootcamps, meetups, and startup weekends focused on social entrepreneurship, and if you find one that fits your schedule and budget, it will prove pivotal to your personal and professional experience as a social changemaker.

With that in mind, we’d like to share some of the biggest and most well-known events taking place this year. The price tags must surprise you, but don’t let the sticker shock scare you away: undergrads can always apply for a Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship (PCSE) Enrichment Grant to help defray costs, and there may be other sources of funding out there, such as the WSA’s Student Budget Committee if the event is closely related to your work with a student group. The conferences often overlap with classes, but if you find yourself stranded on campus, you can usually follow along online for free.

We’re eager to hear your thoughts on these events and hear about others you have attended. If you plan to attend any events this fall, we may be able to arrange rideshares. Please add a comment below or contact Makaela Kingsley ’98, Director of the PCSE.

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Social Capital Markets (SOCAP) SOCAP14
September 2-5, 2014
San Francisco, CA
$1395 (stay tuned for updates from our scholarship winners)
“SOCAP14 is the world’s leading conference on impact investing and social enterprise. Held in San Francisco, September 2-5, SOCAP14 will unite innovators in business, tech, the sharing economy, health, philanthropy, and more to advance environmental and social causes. This year’s theme, ‘Igniting Vibrant Communities,’ challenges us all to look for vibrant communities when seeking evidence of successful impact.”

Leading Change Summit Leading Change
September 3-6, 2014
San Francisco, CA
$1,050
“Engage with diverse voices to ignite new ideas. Activate your strategies with expert advice and planning tools. Change the way you create impact… Exclusvely for nonprofit leaders, this event offers three tracks to accelerate your career development: Impact Leadership, Digital Strategy, and the Future of Technology.”

Better World by Design Better by Design
September 19-21, 2014
Providence, RI
Students: $25 for one day, $45 for three days
Professionals: $175 for one day, $245 for three days
Free tickets available for volunteers
“Each year, Better World by Design brings a global community of innovators to Providence, Rhode Island to reach across disciplines and unite under a common goal: building a better world. Presenters share engaging stories, workshops teach creative skills, and discussions reframe perspectives. Better World is an immersive experience that deepens our understanding of the power of design, technology, and enterprise to engage our communities and sustain our environment.”

Social Good Summit Social Good Summit
September 21-22, 2014
New York, NY
$70 per day
“The Social Good Summit is a two-day conference examining the impact of technology and new media on social good initiatives around the world. Held during UN Week from September 21-22, the Social Good Summit unites a dynamic community of global leaders and grassroots activists to discuss solutions for the greatest challenges of our time.”

Social Enterprise World Forum SEWF
October 14-16, 2014
Seoul, Korea
$500 (8/31)
“The forum will look at how we can address social change specifically through examples of Social Innovation, Social Inclusion and Social Investment from some of the industry’s global leaders. This event will showcase innovative concepts for sustainable development and growth of social enterprise. It will also establish a strategy for social integration, the key driver for social value creation through social innovation and social enterprise.”

Kairos Global Summit Kairos
October 17-19 2014
Laguna Niguel, CA
“Young entrepreneurs and influential leaders gather to ask, ‘if you could focus the next generation of entrepreneurs on solving one problem, what would it be?’”
More information on registration coming soon.

PopTech PopTech
October 23-24, 2014
Camden, ME
$2,000
“600 thought leaders in business, industry, science, technology, design, social and ecological innovation, the arts and humanities, philanthropy and other fields will convene to share ‘breakthrough ideas at the edge of change.’ The conference is designed to foster relationships and collaborations.”

Social Enterprise Conference by the Columbia Business School Columbia
October 31, 2014
New York, NY
$100
“Help spark the conversation on driving sustainable change beyond the new millennium: How are companies successfully ingraining sustainability into the development of their corporate strategy and business practices? What are the challenges to harnessing the power of capital markets to create sustainable impact for the global community and environment? How can design thinking, new behavioral models, and socially-conscious marketing create the right incentives for lasting structural and systems-wide changes?”

Net Impact Conference net-impact-logo-1
November 6-8, 2014
Minneapolis, MN
Students: $365 (until 10/3)
“Engage with 350+ inspiring speakers from across sectors who are breaking new ground in social and environmental change. Learn from 100 sessions across 10 tracks – from Sustainable Food to International Development – designed to take your inspiration, innovation, and impact to the next level. Connect with 2,700 like-minded student and professional peers and thought leaders from our global Net Impact community.”

Lend for American Summit LFA
November 15-16, 2014
University of California, Berkeley
$65 (early bird rate)
“The LFA Summit connects student leaders from across the country with national experts for a weekend of intensive training and peer learning. Through hands-on sessions that use real-life examples led by both students and professionals, attendees walk away with clear and ambitious plans for their Campus MFIs.”
LFA will also accept session proposals until September 21.

Global Health and Innovation Conferenceglobal-health-innovation-conference-ghic-2012_500x286
March 28-29, 2015
New Haven, CT
Students: $110 (until 8/31)
Non-students: $165
“The Global Health & Innovation Conference (#GHIC) is the world’s leading and largest global health conference as well as the largest social entrepreneurship conference, with 2,200 professionals and students from all 50 states and more than 55 countries. This must-attend, thought-leading conference convenes leaders, changemakers, and participants from all sectors of global health, international development, and social entrepreneurship.” We have blogged about this here.
Unite for Sight is also accepting abstracts for oral and poster presentations. First deadline is 8/31, final deadline is 9/30.

Ashoka U Exchange AshokaU
February 26-28, 2015
University of Maryland, College Park, MD
Applications open now
Students: $475 (early bird rate)
Non-students: $650
“The Ashoka U Exchange is the world’s largest convening for social entrepreneurship in higher education. The Exchange brings together 650 university faculty, staff, and administrators representing 150 institutions to share new ways of teaching and learning that will shape the way educational institutions influence the world.”

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Jim Kates ’67

[Jim Kates '67] An essay by Jim Kates ’67 on volunteering in Mississippi after his first year at Wesleyan. This year is the 50th anniversary of what is now called Freedom Summer. The following is the first essay; the second essay will be published on Wesconnect next week:

June 1964

There is a photograph taken in June 1964. I am nineteen years old, standing with my back to a bus in Oxford, Ohio, my right arm crossed over my left, my right hand held by a black man my age, my left by a white woman. We are singing “We Shall Overcome” with our whole heart. A photographer named Steve Shapiro snapped it originally for Life Magazine, and the photograph is owned by a commercial archive. It has become, like photographs of a napalmed Vietnamese child and a screaming college student at Kent State, an emblem of an age, a representative image of a time, and of an event that has passed not only into history, but also into a kind of mythic space.

The first time I came across the picture, on the dust jacket of Doug McAdams’ Freedom Summer, I saw it the way almost everyone else does. I recognized the scene (and knew I’d been there) but didn’t see myself in it. It took a second look, an almost tactile recall of the roll of a shirt sleeve and the way the wristwatch turned inward on the right wrist for me to recognize myself. And the picture has forced me to accept my own place in it, not as a named figure with a rounded life and children of my own, the whole personality I think myself to be, but, more humbly, as a tiny, anonymous (but not inconsequential) part of something much larger and grander — a generation, an idea, a hope, a universe.

[Jim Kates and volunteers, June 1964]

So it’s not really a photograph of me. I just happened to be in the range of a camera that was recording — on speculation — something that later came to be called history. The day after that photo was taken, three of my colleagues were dead. And year after year I trot myself out, like the picture, as a living exhibit of history in classrooms and lecture halls. I connect the events of 1964 with the events of today as best I can. Every year I get a little older, my perspective deepens, and every year that nineteen- year old boy keeps singing “We Shall Overcome” with my whole heart.

I am proud of the boy in that picture. What I’m most proud of about him is what makes him different from the running Vietnamese child and the college girl whose arms are flung out over a corpse — he is not a victim of his times, but an agent of them. He did not wait to have things happen to him, but he did what he could to make things happen, and he is memorialized forever in that posture, hoping with my whole heart and an open mouth that “We Shall Overcome.” I have put a copy of that picture in my daughter’s memory box and labeled it “Papa,” not merely out of pride in the boy who is now her father. It is also in the hope that it will help to inspire her to make her place in the world, so that if she ever gets snapped by chance into an emblematic image of her age, it will be not for weeping in pain, but for singing the hope of her own acts.

***

That summer of 1964 began for me on Broadway, at a production of Hamlet directed by John Gielgud and starring Richard Burton. The same night, I boarded a Greyhound bus for Columbus, Ohio, on my way to a training session at Western College for Women (now absorbed into Miami University) for the Mississippi Summer Project. Let Hamlet stand in for the world I left when I entered rural, poverty-stricken, segregated Mississippi. It was a sophisticated, literate New York I had come to know by heart, a theatre district I haunted in every spare moment during my high-school years, and to which I would return, irrevocably changed. I hadn’t planned on going to Mississippi that summer. My original plans were to take the most junior part in a repertory company planning summer theatre on Nantucket. But those plans fell apart at the end of winter, just when the idea of joining the summer project became interesting.

The civil rights movement in Mississippi had first been brought home to me a year earlier, when I was a high-school senior in White Plains, New York. In March 1963, a former high-school schoolmate — Dave Gelfand, then a freshman at Brandeis — got in touch with a friend of mine, Peter Sandman, saying he was going to drive to Greenwood in a station wagon in a week and a half, and could we please assemble some food and clothing for him to take with him. He sent us some information, including copies of The Student Voice, the propaganda newsletter of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, telling the story of sharecroppers expelled from their plantations for trying to register to vote, and of a SNCC civil rights worker, Jimmie Travis, who had been shot by white vigilantes trying to frighten the civil-rights “movement” out of Mississippi. All of it was reasonably new to me. Names like Fannie Lou Hamer’s and Jimmie Travis’s meant nothing, although I had met John Howard Griffin, the author of Black Like Me, and P.D. East, the editor of The Petal Paper, in my own living room. Peter and I didn’t think we could do much — we had a busy week ahead, and our school was in in the middle of its own clothing drive for poor people in Kentucky. But Peter went off to a high-school journalists’ conference at Columbia, where he met someone who offered us the use of the mimeograph machine of a long-standing left-wing beehive at 5 Beekman Street. I happened to be in the city that weekend, too, and we got together at my father’s apartment over a bottle of chianti, whipped up a propaganda leaflet, borrowed money from still another friend who had come into the City to do research at the Public Library, printed it up, took it back to White Plains, gathered ten of our classmates at my house, divided the city into ten districts, and — by the end of a week of mobilizing more than 200 others to help us canvass the county — filled the Gelfands’ two-car garage with donated food and clothing. SNCC arranged for a truck to haul it all down to Mississippi. I went back to my studies, and to summer school in Maine after graduation. During the famous March in Washington, I was hitchhiking with another friend through eastern Canada.

Now, as a freshman at Wesleyan University, I applied for the summer project that has since entered American historical mythology as “Freedom Summer.” I was called before a committee for an interview, and they rejected my application. (Not until decades later was I able to color in this picture: that I hadn’t been political enough for the Allard Lowenstein contingent trying to control the summer project, and it was Lowenstein’s Yale people controlling my interview.) But I wasn’t prepared to stop there. The New York leftist literary critic Max Geismar was a friend of my family, and I called on him to try to get me accepted. He succeeded.

Because I was under twenty-one, I needed parental permission to go to Mississippi. I hadn’t told either of my parents of my application. I hitchhiked the well-worn route down to White Plains from Wesleyan, and brought the form to my mother.

“I don’t want you to go,” she said, “but I can’t stop you.”

“Of course you can stop me,” I said. “If you don’t sign, I can’t go.”

“No,” she said. “I mean, the way I raised you, I can’t stop you.”

She signed.

Sometime that spring, I attended a meeting at Riverside Church in New York City. I have no idea who else was there — I knew no one — but it was a kind of pre-orientation orientation. I recall now only that someone — it must have been a SNCC field secretary — said that he was not talking about the possibility that one of us might be killed, but the probability that more than one of us would. (This statement becomes important in the light of accusations that we were naive innocents led to our slaughter by cynical SNCC staffers looking for martyrs. If anything, we were over-warned.)

And so I went to Hamlet. Burton mouthed his lines like mashed potatoes. Then I boarded the bus at midnight.

In Columbus, a car from Western College met me. I carried a typewriter, a backpack, and a hundred dollars in cash. What I remember of Columbus was that it seemed to be filled with barbers’ colleges. Of Oxford itself and of the college, I remember almost as little, except that it was very green. I must have had at least one roommate, I don’t recall his name or face.

The loneliness I felt in Oxford was the loneliness I brought with me. I was a white boy who loved Shakespeare and opera, who didn’t drive a car, who had grown up hero- worshiping Robert E. Lee, and who had, seven years earlier, taken a one-week car-trip with his father visiting the shrines of the Confederacy. I felt I had very little in common with all the others milling around the Western College campus. Some of these were the children of Midwestern Protestant clergy, others were “Red Diaper” babies or older, political-science types from Stanford and Yale. The experience of those two weeks of intense training and a common political goal bound me to these strangers, but, with no more than one or two exceptions, the bonding went no deeper than the experience.

For reasons both personal and political, I was not particularly indulgent of my own feelings during the orientation. The letters I wrote back to White Plains were composed mostly with the intent of explaining and supporting our activities. These letters (and my later ones from Mississippi, in 1964 and 1965) were mimeographed by my mother and distributed to a list of people, including the editor of the local newspaper, who reprinted them as they came in. Later, they became the nucleus of a collection of letters from more than one hundred fifty of the volunteers, published in 1965 as Letters from Mississippi. (The book has been reprinted by Zephyr Press.)

When the assignments were made to the different projects, I was slotted for the project centered in Vicksburg. Uncomfortable with the director of that project, I signed up for the project farther south, the Third Congressional District, which was considered the most dangerous place to work, and therefore took only those who selected themselves from within the general group of volunteers. I did this after talking with the one person I had become most friendly with in Oxford — Jimmie Travis. (There is an irony here. The year before, working on the leaflet over that bottle of chianti in New York City, I had read the account of Jimmie’s shooting and had said to Peter, “I’ll do everything I can up here, but I’ll be goddamned if you catch me going down there!”) The only other person I remember being friendly with was a Western College student who hung around the training, Mary Volk. David Gelfand was a volunteer, but we were never close friends. Two other Wesleyan classmates trained that week. I liked and respected John Suter, but didn’t know him very well except as someone who liked Gershwin and Wagner. For nearly half a century, I forgot that Joe Smith had also been in our group; he reminded me at our fortieth college reunion. In general, I continued to feel pretty much alone.

And then into the second week. While most of the volunteers went to their projects, those of us who had volunteered for the Southwest were held back by Bob Moses, ostensibly for more training, but mostly because he was reluctant to send us into what was considered the most volatile and dangerous part of Mississippi. Several of us in that contingent decided to make a quick trip to Washington, D.C., to lobby Congress and to raise our visibility in the national press. “The first group left Oxford, Ohio, last Saturday and entered the state without incident,” I wrote in a letter dated June 25 but written both before and after the excursion to Washington. “The entire state is now being worked except for the southwest. Bob felt it wise to hold us back until the reactions in the rest of the state were known. We decided to use our time in a two-day intensive lobby of Washington, and on Monday and Tuesday we stormed congressional and senatorial offices. Tuesday morning we met with John Doar and Burke Marshall of the Justice Department and presented our demands: Enforcement of sections 241, 242 of Title 18 of the Criminal Code; federal marshals with every project; and out-of-state F. B. I. investigators to be used in civil rights cases. We were generally — and rudely — refused. Tuesday afternoon we held a press conference…”

Volunteer Steve Bingham had appointed himself our spokesman at the press conference, because his grandfather (I think) was a representative. But it was Len Edwards’ father, Congressman Don Edwards, who gave us his office and his staff for that occasion. (I don’t remember Len being with us, but he might have been.) One of the other volunteers, Mario Savio, spoke with a distinct stutter. But, at the press conference, when Bingham was pontificating in a particular windbaggy, self- important way, Mario grabbed the microphone from him and delivered an eloquent, fluent speech, the gist of which drew a connection between economic interests in the North and southern politics, in which he claimed that Harvard University owned a controlling interest in Mississippi Power and Light and could, if it used its influence, bring segregation down. In retrospect, this was a foreshadowing of Mario’s taking over the microphone at Sproul Hall the following October, raising an impatient, articulate radical voice against the liberal Establishment wing of what was, for us, the White Power Structure.

“… and drove back to Oxford that night. We arrived on Wednesday to a particularly tense campus: The second orientation people were shocked by the developments in Philadelphia and seemed more naive than the group the week before.

“That afternoon we conferred with Bob, and decided to move out with this group into training areas in Mississippi before going into the southwest. Natchez people will work in Columbus for a while, McComb people in Holly Springs, and Amite (pronounced ay-MITT) people in Holmes County. Before we get into our own areas, we intend to give ourselves extensive and intensive survival training…”

Funny how memory works: Before I re-read this letter, it was stuck in my memory that we made our D. C. dash because of the disappearance of our colleagues James Chaney, Michael Schwerner and fellow volunteer Andrew Goodman. But the letter implies that we had made this decision before what had happened to them was generally known — they were last heard from on Sunday — and it explains why I have no direct memory of hearing the news of their fate at Oxford: I wasn’t there when the news sank in. But, when we came back, there was already no assumption other than that the three were dead.

Bob begged us to reconsider our own commitment. In the midst of one long “soul-session” discussion, he sent us away for hours to rethink for ourselves what we were getting into. Certainly I was afraid (most concretely, not of death, which was as abstract to my nineteen-year old understanding as any other concept; nor of pain — because our training had already taught me the distinction between pain and injury — but of castration) and yet I remember thinking quite consciously that, having made one commitment — to join the Mississippi project in the first place — there was no reason to qualify or trim that commitment. I think only one of us backed out, but, in the end, very few of us got to the southwest in 1964. From Holly Springs I was seconded to the Panola County project, which needed people because of its special status under a federal court order.

What’s missing from this account is the high rhetoric of racial justice and Freedom Now. While I was sensible of the politics and the responsibility that brought me into the Summer Project, I learned the rhetoric in Oxford along with nonviolence training, the role-playing, the socio-political and anthropological studies and the music that were thrown at us twenty-four hours a day and that were so crucial in binding white and black strangers into a Movement. But these have been written about eloquently, and can be heard and seen in documentaries and the more general historical record. If I had to specify, though, what I learned most during those intensive two weeks, it was one skill taught as part of the training in door-to-door canvassing. I learned how to listen.

***

In September 2004, I returned to Oxford for a conference of civil-rights veterans and scholars. There, I discovered how much we had become History. On the campus of what was once the Western College for Women, the State of Ohio has erected a roadside- type plaque, and Miami University itself has constructed a small outdoor amphitheatre to commemorate our training. It is hard to be considered, even sat on, as a monument, to be remembered as a stone slab while you’re still alive and screaming. Students who were detailed to shepherd us around and cater to our needs — kids the same age I had been in 1964 — were either ignorantly bemused by our presence or awed by our paunchy connection to the contents of their textbooks. Some had researched archives and led us on a guided tour of a week or two out of our own earlier lives. It took almost as much effort to get them to talk about themselves, their aspirations and those for our shared country as it had been four decades earlier to earn the trust of Mississippi sharecroppers, but the exercise proved to be the best part of the return.

For the rest, it was intriguing to realize that I was not alone in the limitations of my memory. “This is the dining room,” the student guide announced, and we looked at one another with surprise. While all of us had vivid memories of our college dining facilities, none of us could remember a single meal taken on the Oxford campus. Far more vivid were the spaces in which we had learned Mississippi politics and the techniques of nonviolent protection, where we had debated the uses and efficacy of guns or ballots, and where we had sung those freedom songs that expressed our heart.

Stay tuned for the part 2 in this series, and sign up for the Now on Wesconnect alumni newsletter.

Images: c/o Jim Kates

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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

by Caroline MacNeille ’16

[2014 Emmy Results]As we reported earlier this summer, seven alumni and one parent were nominated for 2014 Emmy Awards. Julia Louis-Dreyfus P’14, Bill Wrubel ’85, and Kenneth Fuchs ’83 received Primetime Emmy awards last night. Lin-Manuel Miranda ’02 won a Creative Arts Emmy, putting him just an O away from an EGOT (Emmy/Grammy/Oscar/Tony) at the tender age of 34. Maria Santana Guadalupe ’98 awaits the News & Documentary Emmys announcement.

Julia Louis-Dreyfus P’14 received an Emmy for ‘Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series’ for her role in Veep.

Bill Wrubel ’85 is the executive producer of Modern Family, which won ‘Outstanding Comedy Series.’

Kenneth Fuchs ’83 is the director of Shark Tank which won ‘Outstanding Structured Reality Program.’

The Tony Awards broadcast “Bigger,” performed by Neil Patrick Harris and written by Lin-Manuel Miranda ’02 and Tom Kitt won a Creative Arts Emmy for ‘Special class program.’ Lin-Manuel is an Oscar away from an EGOT!

Maria Santana Guadalupe ’98 has been nominated for a News and Documentary Emmy for ‘Outstanding Coverage of a Breaking News Story in Spanish,’ which will be announced on Sept. 30th.

Join us in congratulating all the winners and nominees!

The full list of winners…

Image: Getty Images

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140826-emmy-results

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Reblogged from: Wesleyan Storytelling Project. (Go to the original post…)

[Miguel Guadalupe ’98 & Maria Santana Guadalupe ’98] A clip from our interview with Miguel Guadalupe ’98 and Maria Santana Guadalupe ’98.

Cardinals nest for life: In this week’s story, we hear Miguel Guadalupe and Maria Santana Guadalupe ’98 tell the story of how they first met—through a mutual love of dance.

Miguel: “How did we first meet? There’s a debate about that. I think I saw her first.”

Maria: “You did.”

After studying government and Latin American studies at Wesleyan, Miguel went on to work in the financial services industry and is now a director at Gartner. Miguel is also an active alumni volunteer and a member of the Board of Trustees at Wesleyan. Listen to his Storytelling clip from last year. Maria, who studied psychology at Wes, is a journalist and a television personality. She was recently nominated for an Emmy for her work as the New York Anchor/Correspondent for CNN En Español.

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Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/storytelling-maria-santana-miguel-guadalupe-98

Music: “Sleep Inside” by The Last Minutes—Ryan Rodger ’11, Ben Block ’11, Katherine McDonald ’11 and Bella Loggins ’10, and “Your Song” by Bella Loggins

#THISISWHY

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Reblogged from: Wesleyan Storytelling Project. (Go to the original post…)

[Miguel Guadalupe ’98 & Maria Santana Guadalupe ’98] A clip from our interview with Miguel Guadalupe ’98 and Maria Santana Guadalupe ’98.

Cardinals nest for life: In this week’s story, we hear Miguel Guadalupe and Maria Santana Guadalupe ’98 tell the story of how they first met—through a mutual love of dance.

Miguel: “How did we first meet? There’s a debate about that. I think I saw her first.”

Maria: “You did.”

After studying government and Latin American studies at Wesleyan, Miguel went on to work in the financial services industry and is now a director at Gartner. Miguel is also an active alumni volunteer and a member of the Board of Trustees at Wesleyan. Listen to his Storytelling clip from last year. Maria, who studied psychology at Wes, is a journalist and a television personality. She was recently nominated for an Emmy for her work as the New York Anchor/Correspondent for CNN En Español.

Listen to the clip

Listen on your tablet or mobile device

More stories

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/storytelling-maria-santana-miguel-guadalupe-98

Music: “Sleep Inside” by The Last Minutes—Ryan Rodger ’11, Ben Block ’11, Katherine McDonald ’11 and Bella Loggins ’10, and “Your Song” by Bella Loggins

#THISISWHY

Record a comment

Like an episode or clip? Have an idea for a story? Record a comment by calling (860) 685-3100.*

You can also write to wesconnect@wesleyan.edu with comments and suggestions, or leave a comment below.

* By leaving a message you are granting Wesleyan permission to use your recording on Wesleyan.edu, SoundCloud.com and social media sites as part of our promotion of the podcast. We may add your recorded message to an upcoming episode or clip.

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