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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Katey Rich '06]
By Caroline MacNeille ’16

Harry Potter fans around the world are rejoicing. On the fan website Pottermore, J.K. Rowling has released a short story that catches up with the beloved wizards at the wizarding World Cup. Katey Rich ’06, editor of Vanity Fair‘s Hollywood, reports on the gossip update that everyone is talking about:

While you’ve been paying attention to the Muggle World Cup happening in Brazil, a far more magical, and we daresay important, sporting competition has been happening in the Patagonian desert. At Pottermore, at least, it is time again for the Quidditch World Cup. The official Harry Potter fan site/online experience has been publishing dispatches from the Cup written by Ginny Potter (née Weasley), but today’s entry is something special— a gossip update, written by J.K. Rowling in the voice of Rita Skeeter, and giving us vague updates on what Harry, Ron, Hermione, and the rest of Dumbledore’s Army have been up to as adults.

Brace yourselves— Harry is almost 34 years old, with “threads of silver” in his hair, but still a little mysterious thanks to his career as a top-secret auror, which leaves him with a suspicious cut on his cheekbone. He’s also still a celebrity— Skeeter describes rumors of his arrival with “excitement beyond anything seen yet,” even leading to a crowd stampede.

You have to be a Pottermore member to read the story, and we confess, the login process takes forever and the link that contains the story has been overloaded all morning— meaning we’re not the only ones who will eagerly jump on whichever Potter crumbs Rowling is willing to give us.

Read more…

Image: c/o Alliance of Women Film Journalists

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140715-Katey-Rich

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Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

Janet Collins, renowned dancer, painter, and the first African-American soloist ballerina to appear at the Metropolitan Opera, remains largely under-recognized. Actress and mother Karyn Parsons, who played Hilary Banks in The Fresh Prince of Bel Air, hopes to remedy this by sharing Collins’ story with those to whom it might be most important—children.

 

larger collage

 

Karyn created a Kickstarter campaign, which closes on July 18th, to fund the project. Donors will receive all manner of exciting prizes. There are signed posters, photographs, and books; chances to have a voicemail message recorded by Chris Rock or Jada Pinkett Smith; even opportunities to meet Rock or members of the cast of The Fresh Prince of Bel Air.

You can also select Welseyan’s book on Janet Collins, Night’s Dancer: The Life of Janet Collins by Yaël Tamar Lewin. As Collins wrote in her unfinished memoir, included in Night’s Dancer, her life was full of  “great thrills—and great chills.” Janet was born in 1917 to a poor but educated family in New Orleans. The family moved to Los Angeles soon after her birth, as her mother wanted to live in a place where her children “could go anywhere they wanted to, particularly the library.”

Janet’s talents became apparent at a young age, but as a black woman in the entirely white world of dance, she faced prejudice. At age fifteen she was offered a spot in the prestigious company Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, but only if she agreed to perform in whiteface. She refused. Later, she was unable to tour in the Jim Crow South.

Collins went on to star in Aida and Carmen, and eventually graced the stage of the Metropolitan Opera, its first black prima ballerina. Since then, she has been widely recognized as one of the finest dancers in America. Her artistic and personal influences continue to shape the dance world today.

It’s an important story, one that is sure to inspire todays young people. Visit the Kickstarter page to contribute. The campaign has garnered attention from BETThe Guardian, and NPR.

Photo credits, all found in Night’s Dancer: 1 & 2: Collins in Spirituals. Photo @ Dennis Stock/Magnum Photos. Courtesy of the Jerome Robbins Dance Division, The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts. 3: Painting of a young girl by Collins. Courtesy of the estate of Janet Collins. 4: Painting of a woman with magnolias by Collins. Courtesy of the estate of Janet Collins. 5: Collins with Hanya Holm, Don Redlick, and Elizabeth Harris, 1961. Photo by Bob McIntyre. Courtesy of Don Redlich. 6: Collins surrounded by her art. Betty Udesen/The Seattle Times.

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)


Long Lane Farm is Wesleyan University’s student run organic farm devoted to allowing students a place to experiment and learn about sustainable agriculture.

This summer, seven students are tending the two-acre farm full-time. New to this year’s farm are Rhode Island red hens, who reside in the farm’s chicken coop. The coop was designed and built by Wesleyan’s Architecture II class in 2013.

Pictured, Catherine Walsh ’16 handles a young hen July 14 at Long Lane Farm. The hens will start laying in fall and supply Bon Appétit and Wesleyan’s Dining Services with fresh eggs.

Learn more about the garden and view more photos here.

WILD Wes Blooms

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)

Following the principles of permaculture, the student group WILD Wes (Working for Intelligent Landscape Design at Wesleyan) has transformed the West College Courtyard — once an eroded hillside with compacted soil and diseased trees — into complex ecosystems that provide food, attract insects and requires minimal resources and maintenance. The students also are working on a terraced garden near Summerfields. Follow the group’s progress on their blog.

Pictured are summer blooms, berries, bees and other bugs thriving in the garden this July.

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)

Wesleyan’s Posse Foundation Veteran Scholars attended an academic immersion and campus visit July 10-11. They started their visit to Wesleyan with a student-led campus tour.

The 10 scholars are funded by The Posse Foundation, which supports students with a four-year, full-tuition leadership scholarship. The students will join Wesleyan’s Class of 2018.

This is the inaugural year for Posse at Wesleyan; the university hopes to add 10 veterans per class for the next three years. Deborah Bial, president and founder of The Posse Foundation, stressed that the Veterans Posse Program seeks to recruit veterans “who have tremendous leadership potential to go out into the workforce and become major contributors” in whatever field they pursue.

While typical college freshmen are 18 years old and straight out of high school, the average veteran entering college is in his/ her late 20s or early 30s, and has spent time in Afghanistan and Iraq.

While on campus, the fellows learned about classroom culture, Wesleyan expectations, study strategies, time management, class selection, library resources and other campus resources.

Read more about Posse Scholar Andrew Olivieri ’18 in this News @ Wesleyan article.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Robert Gallamore '63]
By Caroline MacNeille ’16

Robert Gallamore ’63 takes us back in time to investigate the decline and the revival of one of America’s greatest feats of transportation: the railroad system. Robert, with co-author John R. Meyer, offers insight into how the industry flourished, and what caused its decline and subsequent revival in American Railroads: Decline and Renaissance in the Twentieth Century.

In “American Railroads: Decline and Renaissance in the Twentieth Century,” transportation economists Robert E. Gallamore and John R. Meyer provide a comprehensive account of both the decline and the revival. They point to excessive government regulation of railroad rates and services as the catalyst for the industry’s decay.

The book explores how particular economic forces—factory closings and the introduction of high-capacity trucks, for example—crippled railroads, but other developments later offset these negatives. The clean-air legislation passed in 1990 spurred demand for transporting low-sulfur coal from Wyoming’s Powder River Basin to power plants across much of the country. Globalization increased imports and exports, which railroads could move between U.S. ports and inland markets. And the oil-and-gas boom generated new traffic hauling crude oil from remote locations not served by pipelines.

“Today’s industry structure is likely to be the one that serves our grandchildren,” the authors argue. Railroads may not be the force they were 100 years ago, but they are playing an important role in the nation’s economy.

Read more…

Image: c/o Robert Gallamore/Amazon

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140714-robert-gallamore

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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Robert Gallamore '63]
By Caroline MacNeille ’16

Robert Gallamore ’63 takes us back in time to investigate the decline and the revival of one of America’s greatest feats of transportation: the railroad system. Robert, with co-author John R. Meyer, offers insight into how the industry flourished, and what caused its decline and subsequent revival in American Railroads: Decline and Renaissance in the Twentieth Century.

In “American Railroads: Decline and Renaissance in the Twentieth Century,” transportation economists Robert E. Gallamore and John R. Meyer provide a comprehensive account of both the decline and the revival. They point to excessive government regulation of railroad rates and services as the catalyst for the industry’s decay.

The book explores how particular economic forces—factory closings and the introduction of high-capacity trucks, for example—crippled railroads, but other developments later offset these negatives. The clean-air legislation passed in 1990 spurred demand for transporting low-sulfur coal from Wyoming’s Powder River Basin to power plants across much of the country. Globalization increased imports and exports, which railroads could move between U.S. ports and inland markets. And the oil-and-gas boom generated new traffic hauling crude oil from remote locations not served by pipelines.

“Today’s industry structure is likely to be the one that serves our grandchildren,” the authors argue. Railroads may not be the force they were 100 years ago, but they are playing an important role in the nation’s economy.

Read more…

Image: c/o Robert Gallamore/Amazon

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140714-robert-gallamore

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[Facebook]Robert Gallamore on Facebook ➞

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Just a quick note of thanks to the following alumni and friends who donated their time and expertise to the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship in 2013-2014. We learned from you and look forward to welcoming you back soon!

Beezer Clarkson ’94
Kagiso Bond ’01
Erica Gersowitz ’01

Kira Fabrizio ’97

Mary Cyriac ’02
Jackson Ulrich ’14
Steve Marcelynas

Scott Lombart

John Rhea ’87
Shola Olatoye ’96
Sharon Greenberger ’88
John Alschuler ’70
Muzzy Rosenblatt ‘87
Tracey Gardner ‘96

Hailey Sowden ’15
Joshua Lee ’16
Adin Vaewsorn ’15
Nur Moebius

Wendy Jeffries ’01
Liz Bliss ’01

Abigail Hornstein
Persephone Hall
Richie Adelstein
Monica Noether ‘74
Damien Sheehan-Connor
Lexy Funk ‘91
Sam Astor ‘07
Garrett Blank ‘11
Kevin Curtin ‘13
Hailey Sarage ‘09
Ben Carus ‘14

Kate Clopeck

Alexis Ohanian
Peter Frank ’12

Jordyn Lexton ‘08
Peter Frank ‘12
Gabi Fondiller ‘07
Jonathan Leland ‘07
Jason Rosado ‘96
Raghu Appasani ‘12
Mufaro Dube ‘08
Cynthia Jaggi ‘00

Jack Leonard Ed.D.

Evan Okun ’13
Circles & Ciphers staff

Jake Levine ’08
Alex Rosen ’08
Tim Devane ’09
Peter Frank ’12

Sarah Abbott ’10
Joy Anderson ’89
Shawn Dove ’84
Dave Kane ’93
Tim Freundlich ’90
Jason Segal ’95
Andy Weissman ’88
Sarah Williams ’88

Juliet Schor ’75
Steve Oleskey ’64
Jonathan Haber ’85
Ellen Remmer ’75 P’12

Kate Weiner ’15
Meagan Erhart

Rebecca Knight ’98
Marcus Chung ’98

Alex Cantrell ’14
Katya Sapozhnina ’16
Oladoyin Oladapo ’14
Tavo True-Alcala ’15

Tracie McMillan

Adam Poswolsky ’05

Art Feltman ‘80
Ysette Guevara ‘98
Liza Conrad ‘11
Zach Valenti ‘12
Kwaku Akoi ’14

Kennedy Odede ’12
Jessica Posner Odede ’09

Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

This week’s Throwback Thursday selection is Rachel Zucker’s “Letter [Persephone to Hades]” from Eating in the Underworld (2003), a re-imagining of Greek myth. Both spare and lyrical, the poems are written as entries in Persephone’s diary and as letters between Persephone, Demeter, and Hades. Zucker also features in a recent New Yorker article by Dan Chiasson.

 

zucker blog

.

.

LETTER [PERSEPHONE TO HADES]

A city grows up to house millions;
cherished fields destroyed willingly.

The surface is carved over and over in names.

Some call it love, some obligation—
though neither true, we pile up and prosper.

Won, like a trinket, I obey and am nothing.
Hear?—she calls me:

from other rooms, across deep rivers,
complains I’m never where she left me.

She forbids me meadows, untilled prairies for fear
I’ll find the lower whose hundred stems grow from one root.

So I keep to the craggy enclaves, outside watchfulness:
mountains, shores, places which sustain no vegetation—

.

.

RACHEL ZUCKER is the author of nine books, most recently, a memoir, MOTHERs, and a double collection of prose and poetry, The Pedestrians. Her book Museum of Accidents was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. She received a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in 2013. Zucker teaches poetry at New York University.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

We just heard that The Rockefeller Foundation is still hiring for its Innovation Internship, which wraps up in September 2014. If you’re looking for something to do for the rest of the summer – or more likely, if you want to make a note of this opportunity and inquire for next summer – read on.

The Rockefeller Foundation’s mission has been to promote the well-being of humanity throughout the world. They pursue this mission through dual goals: advancing inclusive economies that expand opportunities for more broadly shared prosperity, and building resilience by helping people, communities and institutions prepare for, withstand, and emerge stronger from acute shocks and chronic stresses. To achieve these goals, The Rockefeller Foundation works at the intersection of four focus areas – advance health, revalue ecosystems, secure livelihoods, and transform cities – to address the root causes of emerging challenges and create systemic change.

The Innovation intern will work with the Innovation Pathway team, headquartered in New York. The Intern’s time will be split across supporting the design and development of distinct innovation solutions, such as financial or technological solutions, and of capacity building tools that enable the Foundation, its grantees and partners to continuously innovate to solve complex development problems. The Intern will conduct research, interviews, plan meetings, attend convenings (when appropriate), and gain exposure to several focus areas of the Foundation. The Intern will analyze existing trends and tools, develop reports and presentations and manage projects. The Intern will report to the Senior Program Associate on the Innovation Pathway team.

 

More information is at http://www.rockefellerfoundation.org/intern-innovation

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