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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Kathy Keeler ’78] Former competitive rower and Olympic gold medalist Kathy Keeler ’78 speaks about realizing her career goals in an interview with Wesleyan University’s career center. For an Olympic special of their podcast, Careers by Design, she recounts being a member of the women’s eights team that took gold in rowing at the 1984 Summer Olympic Games.

Keeler qualified for the U.S. Olympic rowing squad in 1980, was a member of the U.S. national rowing team in 1982, and, overall, was a member of four U.S. national rowing teams. As U.S. Olympic Team coach in 1996, she directed the U.S. women’s lightweight double to a silver medal at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. She was also a college coach at Smith College, among other institutions.

In the podcast Keeler––Wesleyan’s only graduate to win Olympic gold––reflects on how she chose to pursue rowing and how she kept at it throughout the years. Whatever career you choose, she says, it’s always a process.

Listen to the clip on SoundCloud…

Image: c/o Fair Game News

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20160822-kathy-keeler

#THISISWHY

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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

Wulingyuan

Acclaimed National Geographic Magazine photographer Michael Yamashita ’71 will have his photography collection One Belt, One Road – The Silk Road Journey featured at Singapore’s inaugural Chinese Culture Week. The five day program, which runs between September 9 and 13, aims to celebrate different aspects of Chinese cultural traditions, history, and lifestyles through a series of events.

Yamashita’s photographic adventure took him through over 20 cities from central to western China. Notable highlights from his journey include the Terracotta Army, Big Goose Pagoda, Crescent Moon Lake, Id Kah Mosque, and the Zhangye Rainbow Mountain. His route retraced the steps of famous explorers who traversed the Silk Road such as Marco Polo and Zheng He.

Yamashita’s thesis behind his collection of photos was, as he puts it, “a celebration of the spirit of exploration and cooperation that exemplifies both these men and is still alive today.” The project partially drew inspiration from the Silk Road Economic Belt and 21st-centure Maritime Silk Road, a strategy and framework proposed by Chinese President Xi Jinping in 2013. The exhbition reflects the importance of intercultural exchange between East and West and it’s role in promoting friendship and business.

[The Forgotten Road]

More info about the exhibition can be found here.

Images c/o: Michael Yamashita

Share this story: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20160822-michael-yamashita

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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Kathy Keeler ’78] Former competitive rower and Olympic gold medalist Kathy Keeler ’78 speaks about realizing her career goals in an interview with Wesleyan University’s career center. For an Olympic special of their podcast, Careers by Design, she recounts being a member of the women’s eights team that took gold in rowing at the 1984 Summer Olympic Games.

Keeler qualified for the U.S. Olympic rowing squad in 1980, was a member of the U.S. national rowing team in 1982, and, overall, was a member of four U.S. national rowing teams. As U.S. Olympic Team coach in 1996, she directed the U.S. women’s lightweight double to a silver medal at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. She was also a college coach at Smith College, among other institutions.

In the podcast Keeler––Wesleyan’s only graduate to win Olympic gold––reflects on how she chose to pursue rowing and how she kept at it throughout the years. Whatever career you choose, she says, it’s always a process.

Listen to the clip on SoundCloud…

Image: c/o Fair Game News

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20160822-kathy-keeler

#THISISWHY

Related links

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE – Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

The Green Street Teaching and Learning Center is hiring a few Wesleyan students to work as front desk assistants this fall. The weekly hours will vary for this position depending on the schedule of events at Green Street (not a consistent number of hours per week).

Front desk assistants should be available for some shifts on Mondays – Thursdays from 4:30 to about 8:00pm and Fridays from 4:30 – 6:00pm. There may also be special evening or weekend events.

Work study and non-work study students are eligible.

Responsibilities include:
  • Greeting visitors
  • Answering the phone, forwarding calls, taking messages 
  • Assisting with AfterSchool Program dismissal and parents
  • Checking in private lesson/class/workshop students and instructors 
  • Event set up and clean up in arts café/kitchen 

Interested students should contact Sandy Guze.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Katie Walsh ’05] Katie Walsh ’05 has stepped away from doctoral work at USC to focus on her role as a film writer for the LA Times, Tribune News Service and The Playlist. In a recent interview she discusses the decision to take time off from her PhD in communications in order to concentrate on her current job as a nationally syndicated film critic.

In her leave of absence from USC Annenberg, Walsh is working to expand her writing portfolio while elucidating the meanings of movies for her readers. Recognizing that watching movies is subjective, her critical approach is to embrace the ways her identity affects her responses as a viewer and to highlight the larger meanings of the films she writes about:

“I want to be able to show the people who read my reviews that these movies are not just escapism — they mean something in the world. Movies use imagery and symbols to tell us something about ourselves and show us how we understand the world we live in.”

Walsh is also drawing attention to the need for a wider range of perspectives in the film industry. She champions the value of diversifying the pool of filmmakers and film reviewers alike:

“It’s important to have more women, more people of color as film critics because everyone brings a different perspective . . . It’s important for audiences to think about how a lot of the movies they’re watching are made from the male perspective, and then thinking about how that has affected the way they see women. There’s been so much discussion about women in film and diversity on screen, but I don’t know that it’s actually changing things. But the discussion is bringing a lot of attention to this issue and allowing for some really exciting steps to be taken.”

Read more…

Image: c/o Katie Walsh

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20160819-katie-walsh

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[Twitter] follow @katiewalshstx on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Katie Walsh on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Katie Walsh ’05] Katie Walsh ’05 has stepped away from doctoral work at USC to focus on her role as a film writer for the LA Times, Tribune News Service and The Playlist. In a recent interview she discusses the decision to take time off from her PhD in communications in order to concentrate on her current job as a nationally syndicated film critic.

In her leave of absence from USC Annenberg, Walsh is working to expand her writing portfolio while elucidating the meanings of movies for her readers. Recognizing that watching movies is subjective, her critical approach is to embrace the ways her identity affects her responses as a viewer and to highlight the larger meanings of the films she writes about:

“I want to be able to show the people who read my reviews that these movies are not just escapism — they mean something in the world. Movies use imagery and symbols to tell us something about ourselves and show us how we understand the world we live in.”

Walsh is also drawing attention to the need for a wider range of perspectives in the film industry. She champions the value of diversifying the pool of filmmakers and film reviewers alike:

“It’s important to have more women, more people of color as film critics because everyone brings a different perspective . . . It’s important for audiences to think about how a lot of the movies they’re watching are made from the male perspective, and then thinking about how that has affected the way they see women. There’s been so much discussion about women in film and diversity on screen, but I don’t know that it’s actually changing things. But the discussion is bringing a lot of attention to this issue and allowing for some really exciting steps to be taken.”

Read more…

Image: c/o Katie Walsh

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20160819-katie-walsh

Related links

[Twitter] follow @katiewalshstx on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Katie Walsh on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Green Street Blog. (Go to the original post…)

We had three amazing college students work with us to deliver the Girls in Science Camp at Green Street and serve as role models for the campers. This year, those young women were Josephine Ho, Mackenzie Schlosser, and Victoria Barr. In this six-part series, they share their experiences and favorite moments of the week.

Girls in Science Camp Reflection – “Helping Each Other Learn”

by Josephine Ho

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The campers from this year consisted of girls from different grades (4, 5, and 6). Naturally, some of them were more advanced than others. This gap created an opportunity for older girls to help younger ones learn.

As a teaching assistant, I was delighted to have a glimpse into the thought process of the campers as they explained difficult concepts to each other. It was a wonderful experience both for me and the campers who were on the receiving end of the teaching. More importantly, it was a great way to know if the campers have grasped the topic at hand.

An activity that deliberately encouraged teaching and learning among campers was the Taboo-like review game that we played on the last day. The campers were split into two teams. Each team sent one representative who had to guess a word from the vocabulary that we learned throughout the week. The rest of the team members were in charge of helping their reps guess the word by explaining the word with scientific facts; no clues on the component of the word was allowed.

Although we did not manage to go through a lot of words, the session was an eye-opener for me. I saw how certain concepts could be explained simply with a 6th grade vocabulary.

 

Reblogged from: ENGAGE – Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Hiring: Van Drivers (Fall 2016)

For the Office of Community Service

—Non-Work Study Eligible—

The Office of Community Service coordinates student volunteer opportunities with many partner organizations and projects. Student van drivers are responsible for transporting students to and from volunteer and service-learning opportunities. The driver will need to:

  • Drive a seven or eight passenger vehicle to transport students
  • Obey all traffic laws
  • Maintain regular schedule at OCS
  • Be at least 20 years of age and have a valid U.S. driver’s license for at least 2 years
  • Pass driving test at Transportation Department, contact the Manager – Joe Martocci at 860-685-3788
  • Hours per week: will vary depending on availability and schedule
  • Hours needed: any time between 7am and 9pm, Monday – Friday; some weekend hours available

Contact: Cathy Crimmins Lechowicz, JCCP Director clechowicz@wesleyan.edu

Learn more

Reblogged from: ITS System Announcements. (Go to the original post…)

The Wesleyan campus is having intermittent network problems.  ITS is aware of the problem and is actively working on the problem.  We will provide further updates as soon as possible.

Steve Machuga
Director of Administrative Systems

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Jake Kheel ’99 and Ben Selkow ’96]

Co-director Jake Kheel ’99 and producer Ben Selkow ’96 have recently completed Death by a Thousand Cuts, a feature documentary about Dominican-Haitian charcoal trafficking, mass deforestation, and the escalating human conflict on the border.

Death by a Thousand Cuts premiered at Hot Docs in Toronto in May and won Best Documentary at the Seattle Film Festival. It investigates the brutal murder of a Dominican Republican park ranger by a Haitian man involved in the illegal production of charcoal. This serves as an entry point into addressing current tensions between the neighboring nations and stands in as a manifestation of the conflict:

“The film interweaves the many sides of the story of Melaneo’s murder told through: his Haitian wife Calina, brother Chichi, local reporter Luis Medrano and a Haitian Nené working as a Dominican park ranger. . . In parallel, the film explores the larger backdrop of the rapidly changing reality on the Dominican and Haitian border due to the illegal charcoal trafficking trade. Deforestation cuts deeply across the economic, social and security fabric of both countries and has far-reaching consequences.”

By engaging the narrative surrounding Melaneo’s death in unison with the ecological histories and realities of the region, the film teases out the complex, sociopolitical factors at play in this struggle for natural resources:

“The fight for survival leads to scapegoating, xenophobia and clashes between communities marked most recently by anti-immigrant policies passed by the Dominican Republic. These clashes come to reflect the struggle for resources at a national and global scale, which when taken to extreme scenarios can lead to the persistent cycle of ethnic civil conflict and international violence.”

Watch the trailer for the documentary here:

Death by a Thousand Cuts has been shown at the US Embassy in Santo Domingo and has upcoming screenings with the Interamerican Development Bank in Washington DC and the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard. The film will have a theater release in the Dominican Republic in October and will also show at DOC NYC in New York in November, before having its TV premiere on Pivot TV and Univision in December.

Read more…

Image: c/o Thousand Cuts, LLC

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20160816-kheel-selkow

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[Facebook]Like Death by a Thousand Cuts on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @BenSelkow on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Jake Kheel on LinkedIn ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Ben Selkow on LinkedIn ➞

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