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Reblogged from: peer advisor. (Go to the original post…)

Thinking about doing an Honors Thesis?

And Then What?

Come to a panel Q&A with

Professors

Marguerite Nguyen (H&A–ENGL)

Suzanne O’Connell (NSM–E&ES), and

Sarah Wiliarty (SBS—GOVT)

and with Kevin Winnie ’16, peer advisor and thesis writer

Wed., Feb. 3  — 4 p.m. — Usdan 110

Note:  There will be another meeting in April about the logistics of doing an honors thesis.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Professor Barbara Juahsz, Akila Raoul ’16, and Micaela Kaye ’16 took a fieldtrip to the Green Street Teaching and Learning Center last December as a part of Professor Juhasz’s Eye Movement and Reading Lab to explore compound words and how they are created with first- fifth grade students in the after-school program at Green Street. The following is a reflection from Micaela Kaye ’16 about the project.


 

B_Juhasz_atGreenSt_12_2_15Professor Barbara Juahsz, Akila Raoul ’16, and Micaela Kaye ’16 took a fieldtrip to the Green Street Teaching and Learning Center last December as a part of Professor Juhasz’s Eye Movement and Reading Lab to explore compound words and how they are created with first through fifth grade students in the after-school program at Green Street.

We talked about how two separate words, like sun and flower, can come together to create a compound word with a new meaning. The Green Street students also learned how there are different families of compound words, grouped by either a common first or second lexeme (a lexeme is a unit of the compound word).  

B_Juhasz_12_2_15_airheadEach child was given a word that could either be the first or second lexeme in a compound word and decorated it using markers and stickers. The lexemes given to the students were all part of different compound word families. Once the children were done personalizing their lexeme, they then came together to find their compound word families. They enjoyed finding their families and were eager to match all of the lexemes to words that could fit.

Once each student found their compound word family, they took turns announcing the whole word their two lexemes made together to the class and saw how some compound word families (like “air” including airport, airplane) are small whereas others are big (like “sun”, including sunflower, Sunday, sunset, sunshine, sunrise, sunburn, etc.), similar to human families.

T_Kirlew_I_Pratts12_2_15We also talked with the students about the manner in which compound words are created and how new ones are created quite often! Given a list of five words, the students created their own compound words, defined it, and drew a picture of what the new compound word would look like. The Green Street students enjoyed being able to design a totally new compound word and think about how two separate words would come together to mean something entirely different.

Some students also took time to do a word search finding as many compound words as they could. It was fun to see how many new compound words the students were exposed to during the afternoon.

It was a fun afternoon of compound word discovery and arts and crafts for the Green Street students. In just two hours, they learned about how compound words are made and highlighted how many compound words we encounter every day!

 

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)











Wesleyan University Associate Professor Barbara Juhasz, Akila Raoul ’16 and Micaela Kaye ’16 visited the Green Street Teaching and Learning Center Dec. 2 to lead a workshop on word recognition. Juhasz is associate professor of psychology, associate professor of integrative sciences and associate professor of neuroscience and behavior.

The trio worked with students enrolled in Green Street’s AfterSchool program. During this special half day program, Juhasz spoke to the Green Street students (in grades 1-5) about her word recgonition research at Wesleyan and then lead a hands-on workshop involving word games.

“Our students had a wonderful time exploring the concept of compound word recognition with our guests,” said Sandra Guze, education and program coordinator at GSTLC.

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)





















An exhibition titled “We Chat: A Dialogue in Contemporary Chinese Art” opened Jan. 26 in the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery.

In her introductory remarks, Center for the Arts Director Pam Tatge ’84, MALS ’10, P’16 noted that this was the first gallery exhibition of work by this generation of Chinese artists in this country. Born after the end of the Cultural Revolution, these young artists are challenging traditional notions of Chinese identity and inventing new ways to shout out in the global arena.

This exhibition debuts at Wesleyan and features works by Sun Xun, Jin Shan, Ma Qiusha, Lu Yang, Bo Wang, Pixy Liao, Liu Chuang, Shi Zhiying, Guo Xi and Yan Xing. The art reflects the state of China today, and raises questions about the sustainability of national and cultural identity in an increasingly globalized world. Three of these artists spoke at the opening: Bo Wang and Pixy Liao, who currently live in Brooklyn, as well as Jin Shan, who traveled from China to build his installation, “No Man City.”

Curator Barbara Pollack, a writer, artist and journalist, said, “In this exhibition, I think you get a real dose of what China today is like. It is diverse, it is international, it’s open to a world of influences, and it’s sophisticated in its understanding of contemporary art. Relate to this exhibition as a window into contemporary China,” she said.

The exhibit will be on display through Feb. 28. The gallery is open noon to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday and is free of charge.

In a related event, Pollack, one of the leading experts on contemporary Chinese art, will moderate a panel discussion about issues facing the Post-Mao generation in China. The panel will include Eric Fish (author of China’s Millennials: The Want Generation), Stanley Rosen (professor of Chinese politics and society at the University of Southern California), and Michelle Yun (curator at the Asia Society Museum). This event will be held at the Ring Family Performing Arts Hall at 1 p.m. Feb. 27.

The exhibition is sponsored by Wesleyan’s College of East Asian Studies and Office of Academic Affairs, with additional support from Sha Ye MA ’96, Andrew and Heather Rayburn, and Amy Gao. Media sponsors of this exhibition are Art New England and artscope.

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

Below are programs scheduled by the Office of International Student Affairs and the Wesleyan Career Center to get information to the international student community at Wesleyan about Optional Practical Training (OPT) and Curricular Practical Training (CPT),  internships and employment.

Feb. 11, OPT: Get a Job in the US

https://www.myinterfase.com/wesleyan/event_view.aspx?token=9lGdUzQiKi6FsBg7ECaPZg%3d%3d

Feb. 16, Working After Wes: Options for International Students

https://www.myinterfase.com/wesleyan/event_view.aspx?token=ZANaa0BEzaYazcXZwDG9Fw%3d%3d

Feb. 23, CPT: Internship Search for International Students

https://www.myinterfase.com/wesleyan/event_view.aspx?token=JeTEctsaFhU4RRjKT9V14g%3d%3d

March 1, Internships with US Companies

https://www.myinterfase.com/wesleyan/event_view.aspx?token=JKEIpkJwFK+uRHhOO3N3Tg%3d%3d

Please contact Janice Watson, Coordinator of International Student Services, with any questions.

 

 

Reblogged from: Class of 2016. (Go to the original post…)

The Career Center is sponsoring the following information sessions on OPT and CPT for students:

Feb 11, OPT: Get a Job in the US
https://www.myinterfase.com/wesleyan/event_view.aspx?token=9lGdUzQiKi6FsBg7ECaPZg%3d%3d

Feb 16, Working After Wes: Options for International Students
https://www.myinterfase.com/wesleyan/event_view.aspx?token=ZANaa0BEzaYazcXZwDG9Fw%3d%3d

Feb. 23, CPT: Internship Search for International Students
https://www.myinterfase.com/wesleyan/event_view.aspx?token=JeTEctsaFhU4RRjKT9V14g%3d%3d

March 1, Internships with US Companies
https://www.myinterfase.com/wesleyan/event_view.aspx?token=JKEIpkJwFK+uRHhOO3N3Tg%3d%3d

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

**This is a reminder sent to all students about the 16/17 Housing Accommodation  Process** Students requesting a specific housing accommodation due to a disability for 2016/17 must complete a Housing Accommodation Request Form and submit it to Dean Patey, Disability Resources, (North College – Room 021), no later than Friday, February 5, 2016. This includes students who have previously requested and been approved for a housing accommodation in the past.

Housing assignments which are provided as an accommodation are only provided to students with documented disabilities.  Please note that housing accommodations do not include current or potential roommates.  Housing offers may not necessarily be considered class appropriate, or represent your first choice in housing, but will address your needs.

If you have any questions about the process, please contact Dean Patey at lpatey@wesleyan.edu or 860.685.2332.

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

If you’re interested in learning more about pop culture in America during the 20th century, you should consider taking SISP420: Super Science! (MW 1:10-2:30). The class examines the evolution of the superhero genre and the influence of historical, social and scientific events on some of your favorite heroes. Of particular note is WWII and the effects it had on comic book creators who were primarily first or second generation Jewish immigrants. We will be looking at issues of race, gender, disability, sexuality, and power through the development of superheroes and super villains over time.

Please email jfragen@wesleyan.edu for more information.

Reblogged from: Center for the Arts. (Go to the original post…)

An opening reception was held for “We Chat”—A Dialogue in Contemporary Chinese Art on Tuesday, January 26, 2016 in the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery. The exhibition features works by ten young artists that reflect the state of China today, and raise questions about the sustainability of national and cultural identity in an increasingly globalized world.

Click here to view the full album on Flickr. Photos by Sandy Aldieri of Perceptions Photography.

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Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

The Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship is pleased to announce the finalists for the 2016 PCSE Seed Grant Competition.

These $5,000 awards are intended to fund the launch or early stage growth of a Wesleyan-connected social enterprise, project, program, or venture. Past grantees used this seed funding to build an online employment platform in Africa, reduce bottled-water consumption on college campuses, bridge the digital divide in the Philippines, connect collegiate environmentalists, reimagine women’s reproductive healthcare, normalize consent, and more. All have reported on their progress here.

This year’s finalists will pitch their projects at a public event on Friday, February 26, 12-1 p.m., in Wesleyan’s Beckham Hall. Lunch will be served. All members of the Wesleyan community are invited to attend, and the event will be webcast here for those who are unable to make it in person.

The 2016 PCSE Seed Grant finalists are:

 

Give Education

Not every child is lucky enough to have the opportunity to learn, but we can change that.

Many children in Cambodia are forced to drop out of school in order to support their families. But if a sponsor were found to match the income that the child would be able to learn, they would be able to remain in school. All it takes is $25 a month to change child’s life.

 

Kindergarten Kickstart logoKindergarten Kickstart

A joyful, nurturing foundation for school and an innovative research-to-practice bridge.

Kindergarten Kickstart is an innovative research-based, summer pre-K program for children in Middletown, CT who could benefit from extra preschool experience before beginning kindergarten. Through a partnership between university-based research labs, Middletown Public Schools, and local community organizations, Kickstart aims to bridge the research-to-practice gap and improve participants’ school readiness skills through a short-term, high-impact, low-cost preschool program.

 

Pertiwi Initiative

Decentralized Waste Bank for Women in Insular Communities

Pertiwi Initiative strives to address a waste issue in the marine environment of Kepulauan Seribu in Indonesia by utilizing an environmentally and financially sustainable model of decentralized waste bank. This model will allow participants to manage solid waste more efficiently while receiving economic benefits. The Initiative also works to empower women by expanding the access to opportunities that allow them to have more active roles in the community and economy

 

TRAP House logoTRAP House

Transforming, Reinventing, And Prospering

TRAP House is a startup incubator that operates in neighborhoods with high rates of drug activity.  TRAP stands for Transforming, Reinventing, And Prospering.  Recognizing that hustlers are entrepreneurs starved of opportunity, we will help them recognize their talents, identify their passions, and launch micro-ventures in the formal market.  We will provide the financing, technical assistance, and network that our clients need to succeed.

 

Walking Elephants Home logoWalking Elephants Home

Working with communities to improve the lives of elephants and mahouts in the tourism industry

The Mahouts Elephant Foundation (MEF) is a non-profit that supports elephants and their Karen mahouts (owners) in Thailand. The goal of Walking Elephants Home is to collaborate with indigenous people and prove that alternative forms of ethical tourism are possible through a business model that allows mahouts who free their elephants to earn a better income through sustainable ecotourism. Returning elephants to their natural habitat not only drastically improves their well-being but also enhances biodiversity and prevents further deforestation.

 

ZimCode logo< Zim / Code >

Bringing programming to the forefront of youth education and empowerment in Zimbabwe.

The aim of Zim Code is to provide disadvantaged Zimbabwean youths free access to the resources they need to learn how to program and apply their newly learned skills in their communities. Through this project, they will learn the fundamentals of programming and use code to come up with solutions to socio-economic problems that Zimbabwe faces.

 

The PCSE is grateful to the panel of alumni, faculty, and student judges and others who are giving their time and expertise to mentor and support Wesleyan entrepreneurs. After reading a stack of Seed Grant applications, one judge wrote “I feel inspired about the future.” It is our hope that through this grant and our other programs, we can prepare our students to create real and lasting change.

For questions about the Seed Grant Competition or the Patricelli Center, contact PCSE Director Makaela Kingsley ’98.

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