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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Tess Altman '17 interviews Edwin Sanders '69]“I’d be very surprised if that access was open now.”

What was your favorite place on campus? A roving reporter gets some answers.

These answers were collected by Tess Altman ’17, A.N. Kini ’13 and Caroline MacNeille ’16 during Reunion & Commencement 2014. This clip was produced by student producer Tess Altman ’17.

Excited about R&C 2015? Registration is open and the schedule is positively teeming with interesting events.

Listen to the clip on SoundCloud…

More stories

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/podcast-wesleyan-places

#THISISWHY

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Tess Altman '17 interviews Edwin Sanders '69]“I’d be very surprised if that access was open now.”

What was your favorite place on campus? A roving reporter gets some answers.

These answers were collected by Tess Altman ’17, A.N. Kini ’13 and Caroline MacNeille ’16 during Reunion & Commencement 2014. This clip was produced by student producer Tess Altman ’17.

Excited about R&C 2015? Registration is open and the schedule is positively teeming with interesting events.

Listen to the clip on SoundCloud…

More stories

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/podcast-wesleyan-places

#THISISWHY

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Caroline MacNeille ’16

[Saeyun Lee]

Each year, Wesleyan invites alumni and members of the senior class to elect three graduates to serve on the Board of Trustees for a three-year term. With Alumni Trustee Elections coming up, we interviewed recently elected trustee Saeyun Lee ’93 about her first year on the Board and the importance of voting. Voting for the upcoming election opens April 26.

Saeyun is the assistant commissioner for academic affairs in the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education. She focuses on “initiatives that enhance the quality of public institutions of higher education and increase college and career readiness of all students.” Saeyun has taught at Harvard Graduate School of Education and served as a Policy Director for the Executive Office of Education of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

What is it like, being an Alumni-Elected Trustee? Why is it important to you?

Serving as an Alumni-Elected Trustee has been an honor and a privilege, as I have had the opportunity to contribute to fascinating and important discussions about the short- and longer-term future of our beloved institution. Wesleyan has given me so much both personally and professionally, and serving as a Trustee is another way that I can give back to the institution. I have also enjoyed learning from and working with my fellow Trustees, a passionate and talented group of individuals; I find it quite compelling that even though we represent different periods of Wesleyan’s history, our experiences are actually quite similar and we share common values.

We all have similar goals for supporting the institution and each and every member of the Wesleyan community, and we are committed to working with President Roth, students, faculty members, administrators, and staff members to achieve these goals. Lastly, I have enjoyed spending time on campus and meeting extraordinary students!

What have you learned through the election process—and why is it important to vote?

I am grateful to the members of the alumni community who voted for me, and I will do my best to be a positive contributor to the Board of Trustees. I think that it is essential for alumni to vote and be actively engaged in the work of the Board. In addition to supporting campus efforts to successfully embrace opportunities and address challenges, Alumni-Elected Trustees are uniquely positioned to serve as ambassadors for the institution and strengthen connections between current students and alumni. As such, I think that everyone should take advantage of the opportunity to participate in the voting process.

Image: c/o Saeyun Lee

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20150414-saeyun-lee

Related links

[LinkedIn] connect with Saeyun Lee on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Cynthia Rockwell

[William Klaber ’67]Writer and journalist William Klaber ’67 became fascinated by the legend of feminist Lucy Ann Lobdell who had lived in 19th century upstate New York, near the home where he and his family reside. She’d cut her hair and donned men’s clothing in order to earn men’s wages, and later married Marie Perry. When the recent search for her memoir yielded nothing, Klaber felt he had to write it. Initially, he self-published the “memoir” in 2013, and acknowledges reasons that established publishing houses were at first reluctant to publish his manuscript. “This book is fiction and I had never written fiction and it was a woman’s memoir and I was never a woman, and it was about a gay person and I had never been gay.”

Now this ‘memoir’ has been picked up by St. Martin’s Press and is garnering praise from the New York Times Book Review and awards from the American Library Association, including the Amelia Bloomer Project, which highlights feminist literature and invited Klaber to speak at their annual conference: “Not bad for a book that nobody wanted,” he says. “And that’s not to mention all the crazy history wrapped up in this woman’s story and where I’d like to think my CSS training came into play.”

Under the title “Her Own Woman: This Historical Novel’s Protagonist Lived as a Man,” Max Byrd writes in the March 15, 2015, NYT Book Review:

There are only two basic plots in fiction, writers occasionally say: “Somebody goes on a journey” and, the other side of the coin, “A stranger comes to town.” Brilliantly, William Klaber has managed to combine them. In this deeply satisfying historical novel, he recreates the voice of Lucy Ann Lobdell, a real mid-19th-¬century New York woman who abandoned her young daughter and set out — dressed and passing as a man — to find the independence (and money) denied her as a woman. After many years of wandering as Joseph Lobdell, she married another woman and eventually found herself locked away as a lunatic.

Lucy Lobdell is well known to scholars in gender and queer studies, partly from her own “Narrative,” self-published in 1855, partly from numerous court documents and newspaper accounts of the “Female Hunter of Delaware and Sullivan Counties” (she was an expert shot). But in academia the human reality of her personality can vanish behind a fog of jargon. By contrast, Klaber begins with a sad, beautiful, poetic image that captures perfectly Lucy’s evanescent, impermanent identity. Through a train window as she leaves home, “I could see on the glass a faint reflection of myself, appearing and disappearing like a spirit trying to enter the world.”

At every stage such images illuminate and animate her world. Guilt-ridden at deserting her daughter, she remembers happy childhood festivals: “All morning, wagons arrived with friends and cousins jumping out like young birds from a nest.” Teaching music in Honesdale, Pa., Lucy/Joseph falls in love with one of her students: “Like a flower folding itself for the evening, she nestled gently against me.” In panicky confusion over what to do and who to be, “my thoughts ran about like ants.”

Read more…

Watch the video on recordonline.com…

Image: by Sienna Klaber

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20150414-william-klaber

Related links

[Facebook]William Klaber on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @WilliamKlaber on Twitter ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Caroline MacNeille ’16

[Saeyun Lee]

Each year, Wesleyan invites alumni and members of the senior class to elect three graduates to serve on the Board of Trustees for a three-year term. With Alumni Trustee Elections coming up, we interviewed recently elected trustee Saeyun Lee ’93 about her first year on the Board and the importance of voting. Voting for the upcoming election opens April 26.

Saeyun is the assistant commissioner for academic affairs in the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education. She focuses on “initiatives that enhance the quality of public institutions of higher education and increase college and career readiness of all students.” Saeyun has taught at Harvard Graduate School of Education and served as a Policy Director for the Executive Office of Education of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

What is it like, being an Alumni-Elected Trustee? Why is it important to you?

Serving as an Alumni-Elected Trustee has been an honor and a privilege, as I have had the opportunity to contribute to fascinating and important discussions about the short- and longer-term future of our beloved institution. Wesleyan has given me so much both personally and professionally, and serving as a Trustee is another way that I can give back to the institution. I have also enjoyed learning from and working with my fellow Trustees, a passionate and talented group of individuals; I find it quite compelling that even though we represent different periods of Wesleyan’s history, our experiences are actually quite similar and we share common values.

We all have similar goals for supporting the institution and each and every member of the Wesleyan community, and we are committed to working with President Roth, students, faculty members, administrators, and staff members to achieve these goals. Lastly, I have enjoyed spending time on campus and meeting extraordinary students!

What have you learned through the election process—and why is it important to vote?

I am grateful to the members of the alumni community who voted for me, and I will do my best to be a positive contributor to the Board of Trustees. I think that it is essential for alumni to vote and be actively engaged in the work of the Board. In addition to supporting campus efforts to successfully embrace opportunities and address challenges, Alumni-Elected Trustees are uniquely positioned to serve as ambassadors for the institution and strengthen connections between current students and alumni. As such, I think that everyone should take advantage of the opportunity to participate in the voting process.

Image: c/o Saeyun Lee

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20150414-saeyun-lee

Related links

[LinkedIn] connect with Saeyun Lee on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Cynthia Rockwell

[William Klaber ’67]Writer and journalist William Klaber ’67 became fascinated by the legend of feminist Lucy Ann Lobdell who had lived in 19th century upstate New York, near the home where he and his family reside. She’d cut her hair and donned men’s clothing in order to earn men’s wages, and later married Marie Perry. When the recent search for her memoir yielded nothing, Klaber felt he had to write it. Initially, he self-published the “memoir” in 2013, and acknowledges reasons that established publishing houses were at first reluctant to publish his manuscript. “This book is fiction and I had never written fiction and it was a woman’s memoir and I was never a woman, and it was about a gay person and I had never been gay.”

Now this ‘memoir’ has been picked up by St. Martin’s Press and is garnering praise from the New York Times Book Review and awards from the American Library Association, including the Amelia Bloomer Project, which highlights feminist literature and invited Klaber to speak at their annual conference: “Not bad for a book that nobody wanted,” he says. “And that’s not to mention all the crazy history wrapped up in this woman’s story and where I’d like to think my CSS training came into play.”

Under the title “Her Own Woman: This Historical Novel’s Protagonist Lived as a Man,” Max Byrd writes in the March 15, 2015, NYT Book Review:

There are only two basic plots in fiction, writers occasionally say: “Somebody goes on a journey” and, the other side of the coin, “A stranger comes to town.” Brilliantly, William Klaber has managed to combine them. In this deeply satisfying historical novel, he recreates the voice of Lucy Ann Lobdell, a real mid-19th-¬century New York woman who abandoned her young daughter and set out — dressed and passing as a man — to find the independence (and money) denied her as a woman. After many years of wandering as Joseph Lobdell, she married another woman and eventually found herself locked away as a lunatic.

Lucy Lobdell is well known to scholars in gender and queer studies, partly from her own “Narrative,” self-published in 1855, partly from numerous court documents and newspaper accounts of the “Female Hunter of Delaware and Sullivan Counties” (she was an expert shot). But in academia the human reality of her personality can vanish behind a fog of jargon. By contrast, Klaber begins with a sad, beautiful, poetic image that captures perfectly Lucy’s evanescent, impermanent identity. Through a train window as she leaves home, “I could see on the glass a faint reflection of myself, appearing and disappearing like a spirit trying to enter the world.”

At every stage such images illuminate and animate her world. Guilt-ridden at deserting her daughter, she remembers happy childhood festivals: “All morning, wagons arrived with friends and cousins jumping out like young birds from a nest.” Teaching music in Honesdale, Pa., Lucy/Joseph falls in love with one of her students: “Like a flower folding itself for the evening, she nestled gently against me.” In panicky confusion over what to do and who to be, “my thoughts ran about like ants.”

Read more…

Watch the video on recordonline.com…

Image: by Sienna Klaber

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20150414-william-klaber

Related links

[Facebook]William Klaber on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @WilliamKlaber on Twitter ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Got grand plans for the summer but aren’t sure how to fund them? Apply to the OZY Genius Awards by April 18 to earn up to $10,000 for your summer experience:

The OZY Genius Awards are giving up to $100,000 in summer stipends to college students who have a plan to shake up the world.

OZY Genius AwardsOZY, a new daily digital magazine with more than 10M monthly unique visitors, is launching a celebration of young genius. We will award 10 summer stipends to deserving college students to help them shake up the world. We want to back the next Albert Einstein or Jerry Yang, Oprah Winfrey or Wendy Kopp, as they write a book, film a documentary, launch a new company or create the next Teach For America. The competition is open until April 18, with winners announced on May 4.

Competition Details: Students competing to be named an OZY Genius will be asked to submit a 2-3-page proposal or a video of up to 3 minutes outlining their project. Entries will be accepted through April 18. The names of award winners will be announced on May 4. Ten students will receive between $3,000 and $10,000 for their summer projects, and their work will be profiled on OZY this fall. A distinguished group of judges, including Emerson Collective’s Laurene Powell Jobs and Google’s David Drummond, will select the winners. Like American Idol, online voting will also play a role in who is named an inaugural OZY Genius. 

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Institutions like Wesleyan are meant to make the world a better place. In addition to their educational mission, this also means investing in — and divesting from — a wide variety of other causes. Joli Holmes ’17 writes in with the latest:

Wesleyan’s Committee for Investor Responsibility (CIR) is the official body created to consider social and ethical issues surrounding the endowment, and to offer oversight to the investment decisions of the Board of Trustees. Given this mandate, the CIR has presented a proposal recommending that the University divest itself from coal assets. Find the Proposal for Divestment here.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

On Saturday, April 25, take a short walk to Middletown’s North End for a community clean-up and block party! It’s a great opportunity to meet your neighbors and reconnect with those that you may already know, perhaps from Green Street, NEATMacdonough Elementary, or Middletown Potluck.

NorthEnd_blockparty

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

On Saturday, April 25, take a short walk to Middletown’s North End for a community clean-up and block party! It’s a great opportunity to meet your neighbors and reconnect with those that you may already know, perhaps from Green Street, NEATMacdonough Elementary, or Middletown Potluck.

NorthEnd_blockparty

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