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Reblogged from: Friends of the Davison Art Center. (Go to the original post…)

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September 23 – December 11, 2016. Closed October 21-25 and November 22-27.

Opening reception and gallery talk: Thursday, September 22, 5:00 pm

Gallery talk by William Earle Williams, 5:30 pm, Davison Art Center Gallery

For the last three decades, William Earle Williams has traced the overlooked histories of African Americans, locating unmarked sites and photographing them with clarity and quiet elegance. This exhibition will include more than 60 photographs together with historic books, maps, newspapers, and manuscripts. Through both his research and his photographs, Williams tracks the history of African Americans from the first shipments of enslaved Africans to the many stops on the Underground Railroad, and from the battlefields of the Civil War to Emancipation. He summarizes his subject as “historical places in the New World from the Caribbean to North America where Americans black and white determined the meaning of freedom.” This moving exhibition reveals the power of photography to bring what has been willfully forgotten or erased back to our collective consciousness.

William Earle Williams is the Audrey A. and John L. Dusseau Professor in the Humanities, Professor of Fine Arts, and Curator of Photography at Haverford College, Pennsylvania. He received his MFA in photography from Yale University School of Art and holds a BA in history from Hamilton College. His photographs have been exhibited at the National Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Cleveland Museum of Art, and African American Museum in Philadelphia. Williams’s photographs are in many public collections including those of the National Gallery of Art, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Baltimore Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum, and Metropolitan Museum of Art. A 1997 Pew Fellow in the Arts, Williams was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship for 2003–2004.

Support for this exhibition at Wesleyan University provided by the Center for African American Studies and the African American Studies Program, the Hoy Family Fund for Afro-American Art and the Lemberg Fund.

Photo Credit: William Earle Williams, Interior, Fort Morgan, Battle Site, Mobile Bay, Alabama, 2003, pigment print. © William Earle Williams.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Wesleyan alumni]

Thirty-four Wesleyan alumni recently held a meet-up in Middlebury, Vermont in conjunction with the Middlebury New Film Festival.

Wesleyan students were all over MNFF: it is run by Lloyd Komesar ’74, features films from Wesleyan alumni and even employed three current students as interns this past summer––Matt Kleppner ’18, Alex Fabry ’18 and Adam Mirkine ’17. Legendary filmmaker Barbara Kopple P’04 was also a fixture at the festival, where she presented several films and gave talks on her work.

Three Wes alums had films in the festival – Bea Alda ’83, Juliet Werner ’03 and Allie Miller ’16, the latter two of which were in attendance at the reception. The event for alumni was held at Stonecutter Spirits, owned by Sivan Cotel ’05 and wife Sas Stewart.

The annual festival and the accompanying event, both in their second year, provided a great chance for alumni to connect with one another.

Image: c/o Paul Disanto

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20160912-wesleyan-alumni

#THISISWHY

Related links

[Facebook]Like Middlebury New Filmmakers Festival on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @MiddFilmFest on Twitter ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Wesleyan alumni]

Thirty-four Wesleyan alumni recently held a meet-up in Middlebury, Vermont in conjunction with the Middlebury New Film Festival.

Wesleyan students were all over MNFF: it is run by Lloyd Komesar ’74, features films from Wesleyan alumni and even employed three current students as interns this past summer––Matt Kleppner ’18, Alex Fabry ’18 and Adam Mirkine ’17. Legendary filmmaker Barbara Kopple ’04 was also a fixture at the festival, where she presented several films and gave talks on her work.

Three Wes alums had films in the festival – Bea Alda ’83, Juliet Werner ’03 and Allie Miller ’16, the latter two of which were in attendance at the reception. The event for alumni was held at Stonecutter Spirits, owned by Sivan Cotel ’05 and wife Sas Stewart.

The annual festival and the accompanying event, both in their second year, provided a great chance for alumni to connect with one another.

Image: c/o Paul Disanto

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20160912-wesleyan-alumni

#THISISWHY

Related links

[Facebook]Like Middlebury New Filmmakers Festival on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @MiddFilmFest on Twitter ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

La pobrez

Porqué la pobrez causa tanta desconfianza entre todos los personajes?

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Melissa Stern ’80] Visual artist Melissa Stern ’80 is currently presenting her show, The Talking Cure, at the Weisman Art Museum in Minneapolis. The multi-media project, which takes inspiration from Sigmund Freud’s description of psychoanalysis, will be on display through April 30, 2017.

Stern collaborated with twenty-four creative writers and actors in the execution of this project:

“Stern made twelve sculptures- some of the folks living in her brain made real. She then asked twelve writers––poets, novelists, screenwriters, and playwrights––to each choose a sculpture [and] write his or her imagined monologue of the goings on in the sculpture’s mind.

[Twelve actors] spoke their interpretations of the written pieces that had in turn been inspired by each sculpture.”

The exhibit reflects Stern’s career-long creative interests and processes:

The Talking Cure is a synthesis of Melissa’s interest in words, people and ideas. Collaborating with writers and actors was a great experiment in how people interpret what they see, read and hear. She hopes to embark on another such project very soon.”


Since 2012, The Talking Cure has been exhibited at Fetherston Gallery in Seattle WA, Smart Clothes Gallery, in NYC, the Akron Art Museum, Redux Contemporary Art Center and Real Art Ways (RAW), Hartford Connecticut’s contemporary art center.

Read more…

Image: c/o The Talking Cure Project

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20160911-melissa-stern

Related links

[Facebook]Add Melissa Stern on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @MSmelissastern on Twitter ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Melissa Stern ’80] Visual artist Melissa Stern ’80 is currently presenting her show, The Talking Cure, at the Weisman Art Museum in Minneapolis. The multi-media project, which takes inspiration from Sigmund Freud’s description of psychoanalysis, will be on display through April 30, 2017.

Stern collaborated with twenty-four creative writers and actors in the execution of this project:

“Stern made twelve sculptures- some of the folks living in her brain made real. She then asked twelve writers––poets, novelists, screenwriters, and playwrights––to each choose a sculpture [and] write his or her imagined monologue of the goings on in the sculpture’s mind.

[Twelve actors] spoke their interpretations of the written pieces that had in turn been inspired by each sculpture.”

The exhibit reflects Stern’s career-long creative interests and processes:

The Talking Cure is a synthesis of Melissa’s interest in words, people and ideas. Collaborating with writers and actors was a great experiment in how people interpret what they see, read and hear. She hopes to embark on another such project very soon.”


Since 2012, The Talking Cure has been exhibited at Fetherston Gallery in Seattle WA, Smart Clothes Gallery, in NYC, the Akron Art Museum, Redux Contemporary Art Center and Real Art Ways (RAW), Hartford Connecticut’s contemporary art center.

Read more…

Image: c/o The Talking Cure Project

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20160911-melissa-stern

Related links

[Facebook]Add Melissa Stern on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @MSmelissastern on Twitter ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE – Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Author’s note: I’m about to overuse a food metaphor, so you might want to grab a snack.

At Wesleyan, faculty talk to their advisees about “The Rule of Seven.” This time management strategy says college students should have no more than seven commitments at once. That includes classes, sports, leadership roles, volunteer commitments, work study jobs, relationships, hobbies, and anything else that regularly demands a student’s time and attention. In this age of frenetic resume-building and schedule-cramming, keeping the number to seven is not easy. During the first two weeks at Wesleyan alone, new students attend an academic fair to learn about 1,000 courses offered in 46 departments and an activities fair that boasts 317 groups scrambling to collect email addresses and claim spots in the precious seven.

So let’s just admit it, most students don’t limit their list to seven. It’s like eating in a cafeteria: there are so many yummy classes (From Tea to Connecticut Rolls: Defining Japanese Culture Through Food!), extra-curricular activities (Food Not Bombs!), and things to do (Pancakes with PSafe!). And really, college is a time for trying new things. It makes sense to diversify before specializing. Seven just doesn’t sound like a big enough number, especially at the intellectual, cultural, activist, and social buffet that is Wesleyan. And therefore, while we all know about the Rule of Seven, few of us actually adhere to it.

College is a buffet of experience. Be careful how much you put on your tray. (Photo credit: The Atlantic)

College is a buffet of experiences. Be careful how much you put on your tray. (Photo credit: The Atlantic)

The problem with this slippery slope of overextendedness is that it often leaves students stressed, distracted, and unsatisfied. They engage in too many things to truly benefit from any. They have so many things on their tray that they end up wasting food and getting indigestion! And worse, they miss out on the learning that happens with a deep dive into a single topic, role, or project. Sure, there are glimpses of this during rigorous courses, varsity sport seasons, and executive roles in student groups, but even those deep dives have end dates, final exams, and long summer breaks.

An exception may be the senior thesis model. By senior year, many students have had their fill of the cafeteria, and they’ve discovered the subjects and roles that sit squarely at the intersection of their talent and passion. By working on a single project for at least one year and simultaneously limiting outside distractions, thesis writers have a deep intellectual and practical experiences. I believe that we can learn from this model and replicate it with other capstone experiences.

So, to students who are trying to find breadth, depth, and balance and become T-shaped Changemakers while still adhering to the Rule of Seven, I have the following advice:

  • In the first year of college, be strict with your seven. If you find yourself with more, cut back. Go for breadth not depth. Fully commit yourself to each class, extra-curricular, job, sport, or key relationship for a period of time, but know that it’s ok to drop a class, extracurricular, or relationship that is not a fit. Reflect regularly: What do I like about this experience, and what about it do I not like? Am I fulfilling my responsibilities, and if so, why not? Will I stick with this or give it up to make room for other experiences? Be proactive. Make changes in real-time, not months after you recognize an imbalance.
  • In the second and third year of college, start to specialize. You can make commitments that count as two of your seven. Four or more may relate to each other. Continue reflecting, but don’t be so quick to abandon commitments that don’t feel great. Learn to muscle through the hard parts. Chances are you’ll come out on the other side smarter, stronger, and better prepared for what comes next.
  • By senior year, consider shifting to a Rule of Less Than Seven (thank you, Ben Stiller). Take a deep dive into a project or field. Remain open to trying new things and building new relationships (last call before the Wesleyan buffet closes!), but devise mechanisms to prevent that openness from becoming too distracting. Say no to opportunities that don’t fit. Hit seemingly insurmountable roadblocks, and push through them. Get closer to finding purpose.

Time-management is not just about sleep schedules and to-do lists, it’s about making tough choices, reflecting and adjusting, and knowing when to stop eating hors d’oeuvres and settle down for a real meal.

Bon appetite!

 

Makaela Kingsley is director of the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Wesleyan University in Middletown, CT. You can read her thoughts on EntrepreneurshipNetworking, and Personal Branding on this blog.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE – Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

The different offices within the Allbritton Center are busy as always, and last school year was no exception. Flip through our 2015-2016 Annual Report and see what we’ve been up to!

Reblogged from: Center for the Arts. (Go to the original post…)

On Friday, September 2, 2016, drummers and dancers representing several cultures led the incoming Class of 2020 in a once-in-a-lifetime performance on Foss Hill as students embodied dances from different world cultures during the “Common Moment” of New Student Orientation.

Click here to view the full album on Flickr. Photos by Sandy Aldieri of Perceptions Photography

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Reblogged from: ENGAGE – Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

The Jonah Center for Earth and Art invites the public to learn about the importance of conserving local open space through a program on Tuesday, October 4, 7- 8:30 p.m. at the deKoven House, 27 Washington Street, in Middletown.  Presenters will be Michelle Ford, Environmental Planner for the City of Middletown; David Brown, Executive Director of the Middlesex Land Trust; and Patrick Comins, Director of Bird Conservation for Audubon Connecticut. 

Forests, streams, meadows, and the wildlife that inhabit them are essential to the rural character of Connecticut that most of us treasure.  And yet, suburban sprawl in the form of strip malls, housing tracts, polluted waterways and traffic jams has spread dramatically in recent decades.  Now, with a state budget crisis and limited resources for open space conservation, it is more challenging than ever to protect farms, scenic vistas, and wildlife habitats from further encroachment.

Some of the questions to be addressed in our program are: How much land in Middletown has been conserved and how can additional land be protected from development, given funding limitations? What characteristics make a property worthy of protection and how are those qualities prioritized?  How do private land trusts work and how can each of us support the long-term preservation and management of protected lands? What changes have occurred to wildlife habitat in Connecticut over the years? How can open space conservation provide the most benefit to birds and other wildlife?  Why should open space preservation be a high environmental priority?

A related program on open space management techniques and projects will be offered on Tuesday, November 29, 7 – 8:30 p.m. at the same location.

Co-sponsors for both events include: Ecoin (Environmental Collective Impact Network); Middlesex Land Trust; and The Rockfall Foundation.  For more information, contact John Hall at 860-398-3771 or via email from www.thejonahcenter.org

 

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