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Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

Today’s Throwback Thursday poem is “Wherever,” from David Ignatow’s 1996 collection I Have a NameThe book was the winner of the 1997 William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America.

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Ignatow TBT

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Wherever

 

Wherever I go,
into food stores,
into the john to piss,
I am haunted by the poem
yet to be written,
that I may live as a poem
when I die as a man.

What does he want of himself?
How to write without reservation,
yet without repugnance,
so that to value writing—
teeth, tongue, and terror—
he will accept the terror.

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DAVID IGNATOW (1914-1997) was the author of many books of poetry, including Rescue the Dead (1968), Against the Evidence: Selected Poems, 1934-1994, and Shadowing the Ground (1991). He served as editor of American Poetry Review, Analytic, and Chelsea Magazine, as well as poetry editor of The Nation. His honors include the John Steinbeck Award, the Shelley Memorial Award, a Bollingen Prize, and the Frost Medal. He was the president of the Poetry Society of America from 1980 to 1984.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Professor Jack Dougherty invites interested students, faculty, and staff to attend the April 29 meeting of his class, Choice: A Case Study in Education and Entrepreneurship. During this session (7-8 p.m. in Allbritton 004), five Wesleyan alumni will speak in person or by video about their work as educators. You can see the full syllabus here.

Excerpt describing the April 29 session:

Panel discussion (7-8pm via video conference or in-person) with Wesleyan alumni working as educators, on how they entered the teaching profession and their personal experiences across different types of public choice schools:

Resources:

Ayurveda

Reblogged from: class of 2015. (Go to the original post…)

Unknown

Ayurveda

Optimize health through harmony.
Learn how to maintain balance, improve vitality, and resist disease through lifestyle & diet choices.
Wednesday April 1st
6 PM
Usdan 108
**FREE FOOD**
Featuring Marc Edwards, MD

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

Dear Students,

The office of Student Activities and Leadership Development would like to remind you that you can nominate student leaders and student organizations for the 2015 Leadership Awards. Nominations are being accepted now until April 4th.

For more information about the awards or to submit a nomination please visit: http://www.wesleyan.edu/sald/leadership_development/leadership_awards.html.

Best, Elisa Cardona, Director of Student Activities and Leadership Development / New Student Orientation

Reblogged from: Class of 2016. (Go to the original post…)

The Deans’ Office and the Office of Study Abroad are hosting an event for prospective study abroad students. We are hosting, but the presenters will be students who have recently returned from study abroad. These students have great pictures to show and stories to tell about their experiences, and if you are planning to study abroad, we’re sure you have great interest and questions for them.

Daniel Family Commons
Tuesday, March 31, from 4:30 – 6 p.m.
Light refreshments will be served

Please use this form to RSVP.

Looking forward to seeing many of you there! And while we have you reading this, please like the Office of Study Abroad’s new Facebook page.

Reblogged from: Center for the Arts. (Go to the original post…)

CFA Arts Administration Intern Chloe Jones ’15 talks to singer-songwriter Omnia Hegazy, who performs with her band this Friday, March 27, 2015 at 8pm in Crowell Concert Hall as part of Muslim Women’s Voices at Wesleyan.

You began writing lyrics for your first EP on a trip to Egypt in 2010.  What about the trip inspired you to start writing?

Omnia Hegazy

Omnia Hegazy

I tend to take a notebook with me and scribble wherever I go, and it was the summer before [Hosni] Mubarak was overthrown, so everyone was talking about politics all the time.  I was staying in a youth shelter at the time and talking with other Egyptians about what was going on and writing down my observations about how women are treated, about things I felt were unfair in the culture.  These are things that I grew up with in America, as well—people take their culture with them.  So I started writing things down and not necessarily as an outsider because these things do exist in America too.  These inequalities are not just among Egyptians but everybody.

What inspired your second EP, Judgment Day?

I wrote this song after watching a film called The Stoning of Soraya M, based [on] a true story about a woman in Iran who was stoned because her husband framed her for adultery. This actually happened in the 1980s.  I was so upset by the film that I wrote a song, not so much about the film, but about what is happening to people of my faith.  It was a critique about how I feel some people of my faith have taken religion and made it so evil and how it can really harm people.  The song became the title track of the EP.

Judgment Day is a provocative title.  What does the title mean to you?

I feel that as a Middle Eastern woman, there is a lot of judgment.  We face a lot more judgment than our male counterparts.  Our reputation is our biggest asset in a lot of cases. The title was about that feeling of constantly being judged.  I feel like every day is judgment day for an Arab woman, a Muslim woman.  Everyone else is judging what you should do, what you should say, what you should sing.  That’s what I tried to address with the title and specifically with that song.

You say you might have been a journalist, had your life gone a different direction.  Thinking about journalism and songwriting as two forms of storytelling, what do you think song achieves that journalism does not? 

For me, writing a song can appeal to people’s emotions in a way that hard news just can’t.  Often people just want to turn the news off because it’s so depressing, but with song one can elaborate behind whatever story you’re telling to make people really feel.  It’s not just the facts, not just what happened.  I think the reason song is so effective is that it helps creates empathy in a way that sometimes hard news just doesn’t.

What do you hope people will gain from listening to your music? 

I want to make people think.  I want people to have a good time, but there’s a lot of music out there that doesn’t necessarily really make people think.  To be fair, I think that all music has a place.  I don’t think you have to address an issue for the music to be important, like the stuff I’m writing now is more about personal things.  I think that’s just as important because I think songwriting attempts to reach an understanding about the human condition.  I want people to feel something when they listen to my music.  Whether I’m writing about a break up or political evil, I just want them to feel something.

Do you think your songs fall into either a personal or political category, or do you think both the personal and the political are manifest in each song you write?

To me the two are intertwined.  How I feel about any given issue is political, and it’s personal.  I’m observing, and I recognize that there’s bias in my music.  I wouldn’t see it as hard news, so much as an op-ed.  It’s personal and political.  One of my newer singles that just came out is very personal.  It’s about street harassment,  about being a woman and feeling unsafe.  That is actually something political—there’s a feminist message in the song, [and] it’s talking about the place of women in society—but it’s very personal.

Who are some of your greatest musical influences?

One of the biggest is a singer from Columbia named Juanes. He’s a pop/rock singer-songwriter and a mean guitar player.  He’s actually the best selling artist in Columbia, even before Shakira.  But if you listen to his older stuff, he was using really catchy melodies to write really meaningful things.  He has one song that is so catchy you want to bob your head to it, but then you really listen to it and realize he’s talking about landmines.  He made me realize that pop music is actually a really useful vehicle to spread a message, and it doesn’t have to be esoteric or metaphorical to be political.  Other than Juanes, I’m influenced by the 1960s—any of the singer-songwriters of the 1960s.  Also, India.Arie.  She writes some really catchy songs, but there’s a good message behind them.  She has soul.  I like artists with consciousness, not just political consciousness but any kind.

Omnia Hegazy
Friday, March 27, 2015 at 8pm
Crowell Concert Hall
$18 general public; $15 senior citizens, Wesleyan faculty/staff/alumni, non-Wesleyan students; $6 Wesleyan students

At Wesleyan, Ms. Hegazy will be accompanied for the first time outside of New York City by drummer Max Maples, bassist Carl Limbacher, electric guitarist Coyote Anderson, and Natalia Perlaza on Arabic percussion and tabla.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Caroline MacNeille ’16 with contributions from Aditi Kini ’13

[South by Southwes]We caught up with fourteen alumni who spoke, performed and screened at South by Southwest – an annual music, film and interactive festival that just took place in Austin, TX in March. Himanshu “Heems” Suri ’07 performed music from his new album Eat Pray Thug and Andrew Berends ’94 premiered his film Madina’s Dream. Alumni spoke on panels including “El Nuevo Latino: Fusing Cultures and Values,” “Disrupting Innovation: Book Publishing & New Media” and “Taste Talks.”

Did we miss out on someone? Let us know!

Here’s a mostly-complete list of alumni who attended:

[Chris Wink '83]Blue Man Group co-founder Chris Wink ’83 connected the looking glass with branding in a conceptual conversation for Using Brands to Create Cultural Identity. Chris discussed what he learned creating a beloved brand, what makes a brand iconic and how to build a loyal audience. He gave a special shoutout to Lin-Manuel Miranda ’02 for Hamilton, and posed with a #THISISWHY bottle.

[Jenina Nuñez '04]Jenina Nuñez ’04, U.S. Communications Manager at McDonald’s Corporation, who was a South By newbie, spoke at El Nuevo Latino: Fusing Cultures and Values about “how Hispanic millennials are expressing themselves and helping shape a new American landscape.” Jenina focuses on public relations and social media for McCafe and the National Hispanic Consumer Market. She gives a special “hats off to all Wes alums who had a role there too!”

[Andrew Berends '94]Filmmaker Andrew Berends ’94 premiered his latest documentary Madina’s Dream. The film details the ongoing struggles of people living inside the war in Sudan’s Nuba Mountains. “Although heart-wrenching, Madina’s Dream isn’t depressing. The film is lovely, actually,” said Jessie Cape of the Austin Chronicle.

[Will Levitt '12]Will Levitt ’12 presented at Food, Brand & Community: Food’s Big Moment. Will is the business development director of Taste Talks, a food and drink festival celebrating the future of taste. Will shares: “it’s a totally incredible festival, so many different people coming together around so many different ideas, so many incredible people to meet!”

[Himanshu Musician Himanshu “Heems” Suri ’07 performed music from his new album Eat Pray Thug and spoke at Hip Hop’s Evolution in India – Why You Should Care. Himanshu, formerly of Das Racist, founded Greenhead Entertainment.

[Shannon Sun-Higginson '10 and Ian Park '11 at SxSw]GTFO: Get The F&#% Out, from director Shannon Sun-Higginson ’10 and Editor and producer Ian Park ’11, premiered at South by. The much-anticipated movie is a “look into 20 billion dollar industry riddled with discrimination and misogyny” asks the question: What does the future hold for women in gaming? Shannon spoke on a panel about the film.

 

[Catherine Goldschmidt '05]Cinematographer Catherine Goldschmidt ’05 was in Austin for the premiere of her film Disaster Playground, which “investigates future outer space catastrophes.” The Austin Chronicle found the movie “engaging and visually dynamic.” “We wanted to film certain scenes and re-enactments as if they were staged, cinematic events, in spite of the fact that virtually everything in the film is un-rehearsed verité,” Goldschmidt said.

[Julie Yannatta '91]“SXSW was its usual blur of meetings (day) and shows (nights),” said Julie Yannatta ’91, who was there for Mentor sessions and as part of her work in merchandising. She is the President of Sandbag, which does merch for Daft Punk, The XX, Radiohead and many others. Musical highlights for her were Hippo Campus (Grand Jury Music) and Broncho (Dine Alone Records); The War on Drugs lived up to the hype.

[Louis Willacy '93]Louis Willacy ’93 is the Head of Legal, Talent and Corporate Development at if(we), a company “building social products to enable meaningful connections between people.” If(we) held a panel called Mobile: How to Build Beyond the Phone, discussing the future of mobile devices and how companies are building “the next wave of user experience.”

[Atif Rafiq '94]McDonald’s Corporation’s Chief Digital Officer Atif Rafiq ’94 hosted pitch sessions for startups and spoke about how McDonald’s is “using digital to enhance the every day.”

[Jane Randel '89]Jane Randel ’89, senior advisor for the NFL, spoke at SXsports: Hitting the Sweet Spot of Interactive & Film. Jane is also a Co-Founder at NO MORE, “a public awareness and engagement campaign focused on ending domestic violence and sexual assault.”

[Aaron Lammer '03]Aaron Lammer ’03, co-founder Longform Media, moderated Disrupting Innovation: Book Publishing & New Media, a panel looking at innovations in publishing and the ways in which the industry is evolving.

[Molly Barton '00]Digital publishing expert Molly Barton ’00 spoke at What Would Wu Tang Do? Build a Creative Collective. Molly has over a decade of experience working in digital publishing, striving to best connect content creators with their audience. She founded The Proper Company and served as a visiting professor at Wesleyan in the Spring of 2014.

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20150325-southbysouthwes

#THISISWHY

Related links

[Twitter] follow @aaronlammer on Twitter ➞

[Twitter] follow @tallmanandy on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Andrew Berends on LinkedIn ➞

[Twitter] follow @atifatif on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Atif Rafiq on LinkedIn ➞

[Twitter] follow @HIMANSHU on Twitter ➞

[Twitter] follow @icpark on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Ian Park on LinkedIn ➞

[Twitter] follow @jarandel on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Jane Randel on LinkedIn ➞

[Twitter] follow @jenina11207 on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Jenina Nuñez on LinkedIn ➞

[Twitter] follow @beingthewhy on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Julie Yannatta on LinkedIn ➞

[Twitter] follow @lwillacy on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Louis Willacy on LinkedIn ➞

[Twitter] follow @molbarton on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Shannon Sun-Higginson on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Caroline MacNeille ’16 with contributions from Aditi Kini ’13

[South by Southwes]We caught up with fourteen alumni who spoke, performed and screened at South by Southwest – an annual music, film and interactive festival that just took place in Austin, TX in March. Himanshu “Heems” Suri ’07 performed music from his new album Eat Pray Thug and Andrew Berends ’94 premiered his film Madina’s Dream. Alumni spoke on panels including “El Nuevo Latino: Fusing Cultures and Values,” “Disrupting Innovation: Book Publishing & New Media” and “Taste Talks.”

Did we miss out on someone? Let us know!

Here’s a mostly-complete list of alumni who attended:

[Chris Wink '83]Blue Man Group co-founder Chris Wink ’83 connected the looking glass with branding in a conceptual conversation for Using Brands to Create Cultural Identity. Chris discussed what he learned creating a beloved brand, what makes a brand iconic and how to build a loyal audience. He gave a special shoutout to Lin-Manuel Miranda ’02 for Hamilton, and posed with a #THISISWHY bottle.

[Jenina Nuñez '04]Jenina Nuñez ’04, U.S. Communications Manager at McDonald’s Corporation, who was a South By newbie, spoke at El Nuevo Latino: Fusing Cultures and Values about “how Hispanic millennials are expressing themselves and helping shape a new American landscape.” Jenina focuses on public relations and social media for McCafe and the National Hispanic Consumer Market. She gives a special “hats off to all Wes alums who had a role there too!”

[Andrew Berends '94]Filmmaker Andrew Berends ’94 premiered his latest documentary Madina’s Dream. The film details the ongoing struggles of people living inside the war in Sudan’s Nuba Mountains. “Although heart-wrenching, Madina’s Dream isn’t depressing. The film is lovely, actually,” said Jessie Cape of the Austin Chronicle.

[Will Levitt '12]Will Levitt ’12 presented at Food, Brand & Community: Food’s Big Moment. Will is the business development director of Taste Talks, a food and drink festival celebrating the future of taste. Will shares: “it’s a totally incredible festival, so many different people coming together around so many different ideas, so many incredible people to meet!”

[Himanshu Musician Himanshu “Heems” Suri ’07 performed music from his new album Eat Pray Thug and spoke at Hip Hop’s Evolution in India – Why You Should Care. Himanshu, formerly of Das Racist, founded Greenhead Entertainment.

[Shannon Sun-Higginson '10 and Ian Park '11 at SxSw]GTFO: Get The F&#% Out, from director Shannon Sun-Higginson ’10 and Editor and producer Ian Park ’11, premiered at South by. The much-anticipated movie is a “look into 20 billion dollar industry riddled with discrimination and misogyny” asks the question: What does the future hold for women in gaming? Shannon spoke on a panel about the film.

 

[Catherine Goldschmidt '05]Cinematographer Catherine Goldschmidt ’05 was in Austin for the premiere of her film Disaster Playground, which “investigates future outer space catastrophes.” The Austin Chronicle found the movie “engaging and visually dynamic.” “We wanted to film certain scenes and re-enactments as if they were staged, cinematic events, in spite of the fact that virtually everything in the film is un-rehearsed verité,” Goldschmidt said.

[Julie Yannatta '91]“SXSW was its usual blur of meetings (day) and shows (nights),” said Julie Yannatta ’91, who was there for Mentor sessions and as part of her work in merchandising. She is the President of Sandbag, which does merch for Daft Punk, The XX, Radiohead and many others. Musical highlights for her were Hippo Campus (Grand Jury Music) and Broncho (Dine Alone Records); The War on Drugs lived up to the hype.

[Louis Willacy '93]Louis Willacy ’93 is the Head of Legal, Talent and Corporate Development at if(we), a company “building social products to enable meaningful connections between people.” If(we) held a panel called Mobile: How to Build Beyond the Phone, discussing the future of mobile devices and how companies are building “the next wave of user experience.”

[Atif Rafiq '94]McDonald’s Corporation’s Chief Digital Officer Atif Rafiq ’94 hosted pitch sessions for startups and spoke about how McDonald’s is “using digital to enhance the every day.”

[Jane Randel '89]Jane Randel ’89, senior advisor for the NFL, spoke at SXsports: Hitting the Sweet Spot of Interactive & Film. Jane is also a Co-Founder at NO MORE, “a public awareness and engagement campaign focused on ending domestic violence and sexual assault.”

[Aaron Lammer '03]Aaron Lammer ’03, co-founder Longform Media, moderated Disrupting Innovation: Book Publishing & New Media, a panel looking at innovations in publishing and the ways in which the industry is evolving.

[Molly Barton '00]Digital publishing expert Molly Barton ’00 spoke at What Would Wu Tang Do? Build a Creative Collective. Molly has over a decade of experience working in digital publishing, striving to best connect content creators with their audience. She founded The Proper Company and served as a visiting professor at Wesleyan in the Spring of 2014.

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20150325-southbysouthwes

#THISISWHY

Related links

[Twitter] follow @aaronlammer on Twitter ➞

[Twitter] follow @tallmanandy on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Andy Berends on LinkedIn ➞

[Twitter] follow @atifatif on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Atif Rafiq on LinkedIn ➞

[Twitter] follow @HIMANSHU on Twitter ➞

 

[Twitter] follow @icpark on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Ian Park on LinkedIn ➞

[Twitter] follow @jarandel on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Jane Randel on LinkedIn ➞

[Twitter] follow @jenina11207 on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Jenina Nuñez on LinkedIn ➞

[Twitter] follow @beingthewhy on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Julie Yannatta on LinkedIn ➞

[Twitter] follow @lwillacy on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Louis Willacy on LinkedIn ➞

[Twitter] follow @molbarton on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Shannon Sun-Higginson on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Friends of the Davison Art Center. (Go to the original post…)

titianpastoralconcert

Titian. The Pastoral Concert (c. 1509)

Written by FDAC Board Member Sharifa T. Lookman ’17

There are certain works in art history that one must be familiar with, from Vincent van Gogh’s “Starry Night” to Vermeer’s “Girl with a Pearl Earring.” And of course Leonardo da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa.” When visiting the Louvre in Parisa few weeks ago, I actually got to see this work. Or rather I got to see other people photographing the Mona Lisa, a small panel barely visible behind reflecting glass. It was a phenomenon akin to my visit to St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome where masses of people rushed to the front of Michelangelo’s Pieta, took a picture, and went on their way. An experience that deserves hours of contemplation was replaced by a thirty-second glimpse and, of course, the mandatory photo!

Once I elbowed my way through the throngs of people vying for a front row view of the lady in question, I found myself on the other side of the room, practically vacant in comparison to the space I had just left. And there, on the other side of Mona Lisa’s wall was Titian’s “Pastoral Concert,” a painting I had studied a year before. I was ashamed to have almost missed it, but it was clear that I was not the only one who had. Titian’s painting is modest in size and somewhat dwarfed by the larger surrounding paintings hung salon-style. The technical skill and compelling characters, however, demand attention. The painting suggests pastoral levity, with two seated figures engaged in music and poetry, surrounded by two muses. Though not the most exacting narrative, Titian’s brushwork and palette are unrivaled when viewed in person, and I spent hours looking and sketching.

The Louvre could not possibly be covered in such detail, even given months. The value and prestige of artwork is perpetuated by museum curating, and the viewership of such works is heavily influenced by fame and scholarship. I was struck by just how much artwork we miss in search of the next big work noted on our museum guide. I question when art viewership became less of an individual, subjective experience and tastes became altered by scholarly assertions of “good” and “bad” art.

Whether a canonical work or not, there is enormous value in experiencing, understanding and critiquing it based on one’s own terms. And I would suggest, as much as you might want to prove your proximity to some of the most famous works throughout history, to leave your camera at home. Instead, bring a sketchbook and a pencil, or, if you’re really gutsy, nothing at all. And don’t neglect the works we have made modest, hidden behind silent walls.

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

Please join us for the fourth and penultimate of this year’s lectures on Fundamental Concepts in Theory, sponsored by the Certificate in Social, Cultural, and Critical Theory. Amy Tang (American Studies and English) considers DIFFERENCE at 4:30 on Wednesday, March 25, in Downey 113.

The full schedule of lectures is available here: http://www.wesleyan.edu/theory/html_email/spr15_five_fundamental_concepts.html

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