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Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

socap14In July, the Patricelli Center announced that – through the generosity of Tim Freundlich ’90 and Bob Miller P’99 P’02 – Hannah Lewis ’12 and Oladoyin Oladapo ’14 were awarded SOCAP14 scholarships. Earlier this month, Hannah and Oladoyin attended the Social Capital Markets conference in San Francisco. You can read their reflections below and watch highlights from SOCAP on YouTube.

FROM HANNAH

So, why are you at SOCAP?

This was the question I’d get following any introduction at the SOCAP conference, whether it was someone sitting beside me at a panel, chowing down with me at the Food Truck Party, or waiting alongside me in the lunch line. With over 2,100 attendees this year, SOCAP’s purpose is to build up an ecosystem for an international market focused on money and meaning. It’s a chance for social entrepreneurs, investors, and others engaged with the social capital markets space to make connections and build partnerships.

So, why was I at SOCAP? I wanted to learn as much as possible about financial inclusion, social entrepreneurship, and impact investing, and how it could benefit low-income populations in the U.S. and Latin America. The conference’s focus was on “igniting vibrant communities,” which fit well with my background in community development work. I wanted to see how I could take what I’d learned working as the Program Director for a nonprofit in Lima, Peru and discover ways to amplify my impact through harnessing markets and social enterprise.

SOCAP was an incredible opportunity to connect with people who shared my interests and passions. For example, I got the chance to meet many social entrepreneurs working with Agora Partnerships, an accelerator for Latin American social enterprises based in Nicaragua. These enterprises ranged from a luxury shoe brand that ensures its workers a living wage to a website that minimizes the supply chain to benefit Nicaragua coffee farmers. I also met up with a couple of Wesleyan graduates doing fascinating things, including Cynthia Jaggi of GatherWell and Jason Rosado of Givkwik.

I went to panels with leading innovators on topics like gender lens investing, scaling impact, and financial inclusion. One of my favorite panels on financial inclusion focused on utilizing collaborative partnerships to meet people’s needs. Representatives from organizations like Mission Asset Fund and Sage Financial Solutions talked about the lessons learned in their work to provide financial inclusion products and services to marginalized populations in the Bay Area.

[Left to right] Hannah Lewis '13, Cynthia Jaggi '00, and Oladoyin Oladapo '14 at SOCAP14

[Left to right] Hannah Lewis ’13, Cynthia Jaggi ’00, and Oladoyin Oladapo ’14 at SOCAP14

I left SOCAP inspired by so many people looking to create vibrant communities and improve people’s lives in innovative ways. As I work towards a career focused on poverty alleviation, financial inclusion, and social entrepreneurship, I’m grateful for the connections I made and knowledge I gained. I’d like to thank Wesleyan, the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship, Makaela Kingsley, Tim Freundlich, and Leigh Stewart and her family for my unforgettable experience at the SOCAP conference.

FROM OLADOYIN

SOCAP ’14 was an amazing experience: a unique opportunity from me to learn so much in so little time. The sessions were insightful and the events were lots of fun but the best part about SOCAP, for me, was the people. There were a couple thousand brilliant minds in one place and one time and it was truly fantastic. Everyone at the gathering had one thing in common: a passion for impact. I had the opportunity to share ideas and engage with like-minded entrepreneurs and investors. The friendships and connections formed there are invaluable. I went to SOCAP to learn more about impact investing and I gained so much more. The conference empowered me to build new partnerships, look at areas and groups I hadn’t considered, and invest in my various communities.

My favorite moments from the conference include:

  • Meeting some the award-winning entrepreneurs, leaders of enterprises, both for-profit and non-profit, were selected from over 500 applications received between February and June of 2014, representing 30+ countries around the world.
  • Listening to Van Jones speak about #YesWeCode, an initiative targets low-opportunity youth and provides them with the necessary resources and tools to become world-class computer programmers.
  • Learning about Google impact challenge enterprises through Invest in the Bay. Nonprofits shared their bright ideas for a better Bay Area. My favorites were 1) Hack the Hood, a program that provides technical training in high in-demand multimedia and tech skills to youth who will then apply their learning through real-world consulting projects with locally-owned businesses and non-profits 2) SubArt an organization that brings immersive, innovative art to the Bay Area’s most densely used public spaces — its underground metro stations, and 3)Build, a program that use entrepreneurship to excite and propel disengaged, low-income students through high school to college success. These were some amazing people.
  • And of course, the food truck party!

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Lily Baggott ’15

[Dylan Marron ’10]It’s difficult to comprehend where writer and performer Dylan Marron ’10 finds his time. Between starring in a new TD Bank commercial, receiving praise for his webseries and podcast work, and writing a full-length play, it’s clear that he lacks no treasure trove of talent.

Now Marron stars on the webseries Whatever this is., as Ari, a production assistant struggling to build a career and life in New York. The Boston Globe praises Marron’s “ease with expressing the crisscrossing tensions of race, sexuality, and privilege without ever coming off like a symbol for any of them” in playing the role. But that’s not the only platform he’s adapted. Earlier this year Marron took over the role of Carlos, a Latino scientist, on the podcast Welcome to Night Vale. Wired describes the show as “NPR from the Twilight Zone,” where the supernatural and commonplace come together on the same plane.

“What’s kind of singular about these projects is that they are very much indie creations that have made it in the mainstream,” Marron noted about the webseries and podcast. “I’ve been lucky to find a place for myself in this movement of de-commercializing art and finding new ways to sustain it.”

Marron also finds a home on stage as a member of the New York Neo-Futurists. The New York Times recently praised the theater company for its comedic production of “The Complete & Condensed Stage Directions of Eugene O’Neill, Volume 2.” Marron is currently writing a full-length play, The Human Symphony, for the company. His approach is unusual: the performers are randomly selected from the audience.

“The quick and dirty tagline is ‘stories of strangers meeting each other online, performed by strangers meeting each other in a theater,’” Marron noted.

At Wesleyan, Marron received his degree in theater and sociology and co-created with Joanna Firestone ’09 a 17-character, 2-performer play, Ridgefield Middle School Talent Nite. He credits his time on campus for allowing him to “hone these skills” in writing and performing. Now, in a city and industry known for their harshness, Marron is carving his own path.

Image: by Adam Goldman

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140930-dylan-marron

#THISISWHY

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[Facebook]like Dylan Marron on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @dylanmarron on Twitter ➞

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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By David Low ’76

[Miguel Arteta '89]A recent article in the Los Angeles Times discussed how fewer American “intelligent, adult-oriented movies” are being made in Hollywood, overtaken by bigger, blockbuster fare featuring action and comic-book heroes. Miguel Arteta ’89 and fellow screenwriters Scott Frank and Jonathan Tepper find more promise in writing about adults and everyday life for television.

“It’s gotten harder to make movies about people,” said writer-director Miguel Arteta, 49, who has chronicled the lives of ordinary folks in indie films like ‘Star Maps,’ ‘The Good Girl’ and ‘Cedar Rapids.’ “There’s not that big a variety in the types of movies that get made. People don’t take a chance on material as much as they used to. The kind of character-driven stories that we were making in the late ’90s and 2000s — all that stuff has moved to cable.”

…Arteta, while he has found steady work in television on series like ‘Enlightened’ and ‘Nurse Jackie’ and is developing TV projects, … insists he believes passionately in movies — his next one, the Disney family film ‘Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day,’ opens Oct. 10.

Read more…

Image: Wire Image/John Shearer

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140930-miguel-arteta

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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Lily Baggott ’15

[Dylan Marron ’10]It’s difficult to comprehend where writer and performer Dylan Marron ’10 finds his time. Between starring in a new TD Bank commercial, receiving praise for his webseries and podcast work, and writing a full-length play, it’s clear that he lacks no treasure trove of talent.

Now Marron stars on the webseries Whatever this is., as Ari, a production assistant struggling to build a career and life in New York. The Boston Globe praises Marron’s “ease with expressing the crisscrossing tensions of race, sexuality, and privilege without ever coming off like a symbol for any of them” in playing the role. But that’s not the only platform he’s adapted. Earlier this year Marron took over the role of Carlos, a Latino scientist, on the podcast Welcome to Night Vale. Wired describes the show as “NPR from the Twilight Zone,” where the supernatural and commonplace come together on the same plane.

“What’s kind of singular about these projects is that they are very much indie creations that have made it in the mainstream,” Marron noted about the webseries and podcast. “I’ve been lucky to find a place for myself in this movement of de-commercializing art and finding new ways to sustain it.”

Marron also finds a home on stage as a member of the New York Neo-Futurists. The New York Times recently praised the theater company for its comedic production of “The Complete & Condensed Stage Directions of Eugene O’Neill, Volume 2.” Marron is currently writing a full-length play, The Human Symphony, for the company. His approach is unusual: the performers are randomly selected from the audience.

“The quick and dirty tagline is ‘stories of strangers meeting each other online, performed by strangers meeting each other in a theater,’” Marron noted.

At Wesleyan, Marron received his degree in theater and sociology and co-created with Joanna Firestone ’09 a 17-character, 2-performer play, Ridgefield Middle School Talent Nite. He credits his time on campus for allowing him to “hone these skills” in writing and performing. Now, in a city and industry known for their harshness, Marron is carving his own path.

Image: by Adam Goldman

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140930-dylan-marron

#THISISWHY

Related links

[Facebook]like Dylan Marron on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @dylanmarron on Twitter ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By David Low ’76

[Miguel Arteta '89]A recent article in the Los Angeles Times discussed how fewer American “intelligent, adult-oriented movies” are being made in Hollywood, overtaken by bigger, blockbuster fare featuring action and comic-book heroes. Miguel Arteta ’89 and fellow screenwriters Scott Frank and Jonathan Tepper find more promise in writing about adults and everyday life for television.

“It’s gotten harder to make movies about people,” said writer-director Miguel Arteta, 49, who has chronicled the lives of ordinary folks in indie films like ‘Star Maps,’ ‘The Good Girl’ and ‘Cedar Rapids.’ “There’s not that big a variety in the types of movies that get made. People don’t take a chance on material as much as they used to. The kind of character-driven stories that we were making in the late ’90s and 2000s — all that stuff has moved to cable.”

…Arteta, while he has found steady work in television on series like ‘Enlightened’ and ‘Nurse Jackie’ and is developing TV projects, … insists he believes passionately in movies — his next one, the Disney family film ‘Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day,’ opens Oct. 10.

Read more…

Image: Wire Image/John Shearer

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140930-miguel-arteta

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Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

Dear Students,

There are a number of positions open with the Wesleyan Student Assembly for which we would like to offer you the opportunity to apply. There are currently five (5) open positions for full voting membership on the Assembly, as well additional positions with two subcommittees of the Assembly. These positions are as follows: Three (3) positions for membership on the Academic Affairs Committee These positions include full voting membership on the WSA.

Academic Affairs is made up of 6 students and is charged with representing the student perspective on all  academic issues, including reviews of programs and departments, academic regulations, library policy, student-professor relations,  as well as general academic procedures. The Chair and Vice-Chair vote alongside six faculty members on the Wesleyan Educational Policy Committee (EPC), the forum through which all changes to academic regulations at Wesleyan are debated and voted on.  The Educational Policy Committee (EPC) has both the responsibility and the right to review proposed changes in the curriculum.  Although there are no specific criteria specifying which proposals concerning major programs must be approved by the EPC, precedent and common sense suggest that proposals with the following impact be presented to the EPC for its approval.  Areas that AAC has worked on include: the Honor Code, the academic calendar, advising, Drop/Add regulations, the Art Library move, the formation of Winter Session, and much more.

One (1) position for membership on the Sustainability, Finance, and Facilities Committee. This position includes full voting membership on the WSA.

Composed of seven members, the Sustainability, Finance and Facilities Committee (SuFFaC) is responsible for monitoring and recommending changes to Wesleyan’s facilities and finances. The committee’s chair, Ellen Paik ’16, co-chairs the Committee for Investor Responsibility, holds the student seat on the Major Maintenance Committee and sits on the Budget PrioritiesCommittee. SuFFaC members also influence decisions regarding sustainability, the Freeman Athletic Center, and Financial Aid at Wesleyan.

One (1) position for membership on the Student Affairs Committee. 

This position includes full voting membership on the WSA.

Composed of seven students, the Student Affairs Committee works with members of the administration to help set policy and make other important decisions to improve student life on campus across a wide range of student life issues at Wes. The broad focus of the SAC includes issues of residential life, public safety, student health and services, alcohol and other drugs, fire safety, relations with the Student Judicial Board, and general campus climate.Each SAC member sits on a variety of sub-committees with administrators, faculty, and other students. The SAC serves an important role on the Student Life Committee and the Undergraduate Residential Life Committee, both critical policy-making bodies.

Five (5) general positions and one (1) chair position available on the Committee for Inclusion and Diversity.

The Committee for Inclusion and Diversity (CID) aims to increase productive dialogue within the student body about issues of diversity and inclusion as well as to take action to cultivate a Wesleyan community that is more inclusive to all students, regardless of race, class, gender, ethnicity, disability, etc. It will focus on bringing together the campus as a whole and promote inclusion through diversity throughout campus through discussion, administrative outreach, and campaigns designed to make individual constituency groups feel more included in the broader campus dialogue. CID had a successful start last year, and looks to expand collaboration with student groups and other members of our community.

Four (4) general positions and (1) chair position available on the Middletown Relations Committee.

On both individual and community levels, MidWes aims to promote meaningful interactions between Middletown and Wesleyan through a long-lasting, student-based institutional body. Since its founding, the committee has met with numerous members of university and Middletown leadership to discuss, initiate and incentivize more interactions between members of both town and university so as to strengthen ties between both communities. In particular, the subcommittee believes a stronger relationship between Wesleyan and Middletown can be achieved primarily through increasing / facilitating personal and ongoing interactions between members of the university and the town. Furthermore, the committee strongly believes that such efforts must be done in a collaborative and, more importantly, a mutually beneficial manner. Lastly, these efforts must be done with an understanding of the history and present situation of Wesleyan-Middletown relationships.

TO APPLY:

Please submit a 300 word statement of interest to wsa@wesleyan.edu. Please be sure to include your name, class year, and the position for which you are applying. If you wish to apply for multiple positions, please submit separate statements. The deadline is Friday, October 3rd, by 5pm.

The best candidates will be contacted for an interview. All candidates will receive receipt of their application and a notice of their status by Sunday, October 5.

Please direct any questions to wsa@wesleyan.edu. I look forward to your applications.

Thank you, Sadasia McCutchen, Coordinator, Wesleyan Student Assembly

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)













As part of Wesleyan’s 38th annual Navaratri Festival, the Center for the Arts presented “Vocal Music of South India” Sept. 26 at Crowell Concert Hall. Navaratri is a major Hindu festival and is celebrated all over India for nine nights and 10 days. 


Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music B. “Balu” Balasubrahmaniyan is a vocalist who has performed in India and abroad since 1985. Balu was joined by Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music David Nelson on mridangam and L. Ramakrishnan on violin.

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)


Friends of the Wesleyan Library hosted their annual fall book sale Sept. 27 in the lobby of Olin Memorial Library. More than 3,000 books were for sale, most priced between $1-$5.

All proceeds from the annual sale benefit the Friends of the Wesleyan Library, a community of readers dedicated to celebrating and enjoying books. The Friends raise funds to support the library’s work and activities.

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)

















The 4th Annual Stone A Cappella Concert at Memorial Chapel Sept. 28 featured the vocal talent of Wesleyan’s many student a capella groups. The event was part of Wesleyan’s Family Weekend. 

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Lily Baggott ’15

[Lloyd Komesar '74 P’07]For Lloyd Komesar ’74 P’07 and Jay Craven, it’s time for the underdogs. The former Disney executive and film professor have teamed up to create a festival for fledgling filmmakers, the Middlebury New Filmmakers Festival. Set in the bucolic town of Middlebury, Vt., next summer’s four-day festival will feature up to sixty short and full-length feature films. Festival-goers will soak in three days of documentary, drama, comedy, and animated film screenings, in addition to an opening night party and panel speakers throughout.

“‘Discover and be discovered’ is the main focus of the Middlebury festival, Komesar added,” the Addison Independent, a Middlebury-based newspaper, reported in its recent highlight of the festival. “Short and long films, high and low budget — the only requirement will be that all films submitted must be the director’s first or second film. This creates an ‘equal playing field,’ Komesar said, so that while age and education may fluctuate, the directors will have similar levels of experience.”

The emphasis on budding filmmakers doesn’t stop at submissions. At the end of the festival, which will run from August 27-30, 2015, six top films—three feature-lengths and three shorts—will be chosen. Instead of offering a financial award, the duo is targeting exposure: the winners will be provided with six screenings across the “New England Circuit,” the six New England states of Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.

Back in Middlebury, Komesar will serve as producer while Craven serves as artistic director. After Craven has cut down the submission pool to about sixty films, screenings will take place at the Town Hall Theater and Marquis Theater in downtown Middlebury and the Dana Auditorium at Middlebury College. And the festival is built to last. According to Komesar’s Prezi presentation on the festival, one of the main goals is to enhance the community’s cultural and economic aspects.

“[This is] a dynamic new event that promises to be an exciting addition to Middlebury’s cultural scene as well as a significant opportunity for emerging young filmmakers from across the country,” the presentation reads.

Read more…

Image: Independent Photo/John McCright

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140929-lloyd-komesar

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