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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Aditi Kini ’13

In celebration of the 100th issue of the alumni newsletter, here are some of our “Greatest Hits” in Entertainment news.

Wesleyan at the Emmys

“>[2014 Emmy Results]As we reported earlier this summer, seven alumni and one parent were nominated for 2014 Emmy Awards. So how did the Cardinals do at the Emmys this year? “>Read more…

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Bays ’97, Thomas ’97 end the story of 1,001 nights

“>[Carter Bays '97, Craig Thomas '97]Carter Bays ’97 and Craig Thomas ’97, the Scheherazades of prime time, wrap up the final season of How I Met Your Mother. “>Read more…

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Matthew Weiner ’87 comments on Don Draper’s fate

[Matthew Weiner '87]In anticipation of the two-part final season of Mad Men, Matthew Weiner ’87 comments on Don Draper’s fate. Read more…

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Weiss ’93, creator of Game of Thrones, talks genesis and future

[D.B. Weiss '93]Game of Thrones co-creator D.B. Weiss ’93 talks genesis and future of the ‘biggest, baddest, bloodiest show in TV history’ with Wesleyan Visiting Writer in English, Jim Windolf. Read more…

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Reblogged from: Wesleyan Media Project. (Go to the original post…)

There is a lot of talk about negativity in elections, and as measured by Wesleyan Media Project (and Wisconsin Advertising Project) coding, there is much more of it on the airwaves than there was a decade ago.  Yanna Krupnikov (Stony Brook University) writes for us on the effects of negativity and why timing is everything.

 

On September 30, 2014, Rob Astorino, a Republican candidate running for Governor of New York, aired an ad designed to warn voters about his opponent’s questionable ethics.  Astorino’s ad was a “remake” of Lyndon B. Johnson’s 1964 “Daisy Girl Ad,” and used identical imagery to tell people that his opponent, incumbent Andrew Cuomo, may end up in jail.

Although Astorino’s ad is unusual by virtue of being a “remake” of a “classic” ad, it is just one of the thousands of negative ads that hit the airwaves every national election.  Indeed, as the Wesleyan Media Project reported on October 14, half of the campaign ads in 2014 gubernatorial races have been negative.  Astorino, it seems, is not alone.

Voters will often report that they dislike ads like Astorino’s — negative ads designed solely to criticize an opponent. But dislike aside, do these ads affect the way people navigate politics? My research has focused on this very question. In my work, I show that negative campaign ads can and often do affect people, although this effect is not always detrimental. Rather, the effect of negative advertising depends on its timing.

In my research I rely on surveys, real advertising data and large national experiments. I use these types of data to show that early on in the campaign negative advertising actually helps people make candidate choices.  Negativity, data suggests, is quite powerful!

It is more memorable, and often contains more real issue information than positivity. In fact, my research shows  that people who live in media markets that receive more positive ads than negative ads early on in a campaign have a more difficult time making candidate choices, and are somewhat less confident in the choices the do make.

The effect of negativity, however, changes as a campaign nears Election Day.  Late in the campaign negativity can have a more detrimental effect on people.  When people see negative ads after they have made their candidate choices, negativity can make them more doubtful and less confident about the choice they have made. Ultimately, then, my research shows that this doubt can make people less likely to turn out and vote.

We can think about the effect in this way. Suppose in October a person picks the Republican candidate over the Democratic candidate. Let’s say that after making this choice, the voter is then bombarded with negative ads criticizing the Republican.  The voter is then left with a set of unsatisfying options. She already knows she does not like the Democrat, so switching party lines is not a reasonable option. She could vote for her initial preference, the Republican, except now she is no longer confident in her choice due to the negativity.  Her final option, then, is to stay home, and my data suggest that negativity leads many people to take this third option.  In fact, tracking the effect of negativity from 1980 to 2000, I show that negativity aired late in the campaign consistently leads people away from voting.

When it comes to voter turnout, then, negativity is a double-edged sword. When aired early in the campaign it can help people make important political choices, but aired late in the campaign it can lead people to doubt the very choices they’ve made, leading them away from the polls.

While much of political science research has focused on the way negativity affects turnout, these types of ads have even broader implications. First, the effect of negativity depends on the candidate who sponsors the negative ad. In a forthcoming article with Spencer Piston,  we show that people respond quite differently to negative ads sponsored by Black candidates than they do to negative ads sponsored by White candidates. Similarly, Nichole Bauer and I show that people also have different responses to campaign ads aired by female candidates than to negative ads aired by male candidates.

Second, it is possible that even for people who do turn out to vote in spite of negative ads, the negativity of a campaign still leaves an imprint on their political perspectives. As Samara Klar  and I demonstrate across a series of studies , when people are reminded of partisan disagreement (the very disagreement that negative ads make crystal clear) they turn away from partisanship.  Faced with partisan negativity people hide their party, avoid partisan discussion and they avoid engaging in any type of political activity that may betray them as partisans.

While the short-term costs of negativity may be turnout, the long-term costs of negativity may lead to more profound consequences for political parties: a decline in the types of supporters who are willing to proudly proclaim that they are partisans.

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

Dear 2017’ers,

 

This is a reminder that many departments and programs have scheduled OPEN HOUSES between Wed.,  Oct. 22 and Fri., Nov. 14. Click on Open House to view the schedule and any changes.  

 

On board this week are:

Wed. – FGSS and NS&B

 Thurs. — ENGL and SOC

Lunch or refreshments are provided.

Check schedule for their times and locations.

 

CHOOSING YOUR MAJOR WORKSHOP is scheduled for tomorrow, Wednesday, October 22 at 6 p.m. in Usdan 108.  Dean Brown and Persephone Hall from the Wesleyan Career Center will be there to suggest ways to approach or decide on your major and answer any questions you may have.  Grab your dinner and join us! 

 

Also, check out the Major Declaration Website for information about choosing and declaring a major during the sophomore year.  Check out “The Guide” for major exploration exercises and links to campus resources.   Department and program’s home websites and faculty members are great sources of information.  Questions about how the major fits into study abroad plans or possible careers should be directed to the Office of International Studies and Wesleyan Career Center, respectively.

 

SECOND-QUARTER COURSES:  If you have some time and want some more credit, take a look at these courses.  They begin this week. You have 5 business days to register for the courses by submitting an add/drop form (found in Dean’s Office or the Registrar’s).  Get the instructor’s and your faculty advisor’s approval and signature and then bring the form to me for final processing.  Check my email for a list of courses.

Hope you had a great fall break and are refreshed and energized for the rest of the semester!  Any questions?  Please see me.  Note that Wednesday evening office hours will be from only 5-6 p.m. due to the Choosing Your Major workshop.  Best, Dean Brown

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

When alumni connect with the Patricelli Center for the first time, they often leave bits of advice for students and young entrepreneurs. As fall break comes to close and courses kick into high gear again, we’re happy to offer a mid-semester pick-me-up and share some of their wise words. (If you’re an alum with truth bombs to drop, fill out the PCSE alumni volunteer form!)

“Move where you can make a difference. There are jobs in every nook and cranny of this country for smart, ambitious, motivated young people. New York will always be there (at least until the ice caps melt), so spend the early years out of college actually learning skills and figuring out what you’re good at – and do it somewhere where it has impact.”

- Daniel Bloom ’10, COO & Co-Founder at TernPro

“Do what you can, with what you have, in the time you have, in the place you are!”
- Vivian Best ’03, Founder at Give It Fresh Today

“Live in a community different from the one in which you grew up. Develop empathy for those from other circumstances.”
- Kathlyn Pattillo ’12

“You need two qualities to build something big: the stomach to see all the reasons why what you’re going to fail, and the will to be relentless in finding solutions to those problems.”
- Jon Leland ’05, Director of Community Engagement at Kickstarter

“Do something that pulls you out of your comfort zone. If you’re a nervous or confused, it’s probably a good sign.”
- Francesca Jones ’12, Business Development Officer at Smarter Lighting Engineering Research Center

“Follow the power. The strongest argument or most well-crafted message doesn’t do anything unless it reaches someone with the power to change the thing you want changed. Figure out where the power for change lies, and apply pressure there.”
- Dan Shannon ’01, Senior Strategy Director at Purpose

“YOLO. Make it count.”
- Vlad Gutkovich ’07, Impact Manager at Schoolzilla

“Self-care is important in order to not burn out. Sometimes we need to take care of ourselves before we can take care of others and make the world a better place. In fact, sometimes we may need to focus on only taking care of ourselves and our families, in lieu of working to make the world a better place. ‘Im ein ani li mi li?’ (Hebrew) Translation: ‘If I am not for myself, who will be for me? But if I am only for myself, what am I? And if not now, when?’”
- Robin Alexander ’89, Clinical Social Worker at Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services

“Focus on finding an organization that does good, and that does good well. An organization’s culture and work style are ultimately more important than the exact issue at hand. If you find an organization that is effective, efficient, and inspiring, you will be motivated to help affect change.”
- Elizabeth Conrad ’11 at Hopscotch

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Money and Social Change isn’t your typical college course. In an exciting shift from theory to practice, participants learn about different approaches to philanthropy and impact investment and then put their money where their mouth is by doling it out to local organizations. The students are eager to share their experiences with the rest of the world, so in addition to following them on Twitter, you’ll be able to read about their activities, discussions, and visiting speakers in guests posts throughout the semester. The first note comes from Jojo Weinberger ’15:

We’re in Week 6 of our Money and Social Change class, taught by Joy Anderson ’89, founder of Criterion Institute. This class is a participating member in the Learning By Giving Initiative, a program sponsored by Dorris Buffet’s Sunshine Lady Foundation. Through this initiative our class – along with students at 25 colleges around the country – received $10,000 to grant to non-profits in the local Middlesex community. In addition to working on this grant-making process, each student in the class is developing his or her own theory of change: a theory of how we think change happens. This is our first post and we’ll be keeping it short and simple. Each week we’ll send out some info, discussing our progress in the grant making process and a short blurb about a class member and his/her theory of change. This class has been great so far and we’re excited to keep Wesleyan community updated on our progress!

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Money and Social Change isn’t your typical college course. In an exciting shift from theory to practice, participants learn about different approaches to philanthropy and impact investment and then put their money where their mouth is by doling it out to local organizations. The students are eager to share their experiences with the rest of the world, so in addition to following them on Twitter, you’ll be able to read about their activities, discussions, and visiting speakers in guests posts throughout the semester. The first note comes from Jojo Weinberger ’15:

We’re in Week 6 of our Money and Social Change class, taught by Joy Anderson ’89, founder of Criterion Institute. This class is a participating member in the Learning By Giving Initiative, a program sponsored by Dorris Buffet’s Sunshine Lady Foundation. Through this initiative our class – along with students at 25 colleges around the country – received $10,000 to grant to non-profits in the local Middlesex community. In addition to working on this grant-making process, each student in the class is developing his or her own theory of change: a theory of how we think change happens. This is our first post and we’ll be keeping it short and simple. Each week we’ll send out some info, discussing our progress in the grant making process and a short blurb about a class member and his/her theory of change. This class has been great so far and we’re excited to keep Wesleyan community updated on our progress!

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Good news for recent grads! Arabella Advisors is seeking a new assistant editor for their NYC office. To bring your writing skills to the social sector, check out the details below and on their website:

The position: As Arabella’s new assistant editor, you will use your inherent talent with words to help our teams produce reports, publications, proposals, and online communications that make the world a better place—by enabling philanthropists to achieve the greatest good with their resources. You will join a small editorial team that works closely and collaboratively across our growing firm, providing editorial direction, support, and training. You will need to be smart, flexible, resourceful, and socially engaged. You will also need to be a sharp and attentive copy editor and a capable project manager.

The organization: Arabella Advisors helps philanthropists and investors pursue their social and environmental goals more effectively. Our platform of services enables clients to use all of their assets—grants, investments, relationships, time, and talent—to achieve greater good. We work with large foundations and corporations, as well as families and individuals, to develop strategic focus, execute projects, evaluate grantees and programs, invest for impact, efficiently manage grants and funds, and continually learn and innovate. Our team is socially minded and entrepreneurial, always looking for ways to make the world a better place by better serving our clients.

Responsibilities: 

  • Collaborate with multiple Arabella teams as they create compelling reports, presentations, and other publications that enable philanthropists to maximize their impact
  • Provide excellent copy editing that strengthens and polishes content
  • Help colleagues translate analytic research into clear, compelling language that resonates with Arabella’s audiences
  • Help to manage complex projects with multiple stakeholders and shifting deadlines
  • Support the editorial team’s content development, communications, marketing, and knowledge management efforts
  • Assist with other tasks to support the editorial team and the firm, as necessary
  • Assist with document design and layout
  • Assist with creation and management of digital content
  • Develop relevant knowledge of the philanthropic sector

Qualifications:

  • Bachelor’s degree, preferably in English, journalism, or a related discipline
  • 2-3+ years of relevant professional experience as an editor or writer
  • Experience with copy editing using a style guide
  • Ability to draft high quality written materials under tight deadlines
  • Experience managing multiple tasks with sometimes conflicting deadlines
  • Willingness and wherewithal to make editorial decisions even in relation to the work of those in senior positions
  • Experience with managing web content, email marketing, and new media (experience with WordPress, InDesign and/or other design software a plus)
  • Familiarity with Microsoft Office Suite

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Use your research skills for social good! The Tobin Project is currently seeking Research Analysts to work within and across their four core research areas: Government and Markets, Institutions and Democracy, Economic Inequality, and National Security.

The core work of the Tobin Project is motivating new research on major problems facing society. Our research team serves as the hub for a network of more than 400 leading scholars with whom we work, designing strategic research inquiries and building new communities of scholars across multiple disciplines and universities. Research team members are responsible for managing long-term research inquiries, planning meetings of scholars and policymakers, maintaining fluency in a variety of social scientific methods, interfacing with leading scholars, and providing sustained creative input into large-scale research projects such as edited academic volumes. Staff members interpret and analyze current scholarship, typically gaining expertise within a particular substantive area, and engage with methodologies ranging from experimental design to historical analysis.

Qualifications: Successful candidates will demonstrate first and foremost a commitment to the Tobin Project’s mission. The ideal candidate will have a bachelor’s or graduate degree in a social science or history and a strong commitment to using scholarly research to inform public policy. Additionally, successful applicants will have:

  • Excellent analytical, writing, and oral communication skills
  • Experience designing and conducting original research in the social sciences or history
  • Creative and entrepreneurial thinking
  • The ability to self-motivate and to take the initiative in managing projects
  • The ability to evaluate high-level academic research
  • The ability to work independently and as a member of a team
  • Persistence, determination, and the ability to overcome obstacles
  • Strong interpersonal skills
  • Exceptional attention to detail

The Tobin Project is seeking candidates who are able to start no later than Spring or Summer 2015. To apply, please e-mail the following materials to opportunities@tobinproject.org: a 1-page cover letter discussing your interest and qualifications; a 1-2 page resume; all academic transcripts (unofficial versions are acceptable); and a writing sample. More information is available on our website at www.tobinproject.org/opportunities

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

An exciting opportunity from Wishing Wells co-founder Brent Packer ’15:

Wishing Wells is a budding environmental start-up born from a Wesleyan design competition. We’re expanding quickly & are looking for ambitious students to join our team.

Plastic waste is a serious issue. There is currently 100 million tons of plastic disintegrating in our oceans causing tremendous harm to marine life. The energy used to create the annual American demand for plastic water bottles uses enough energy to fuel 1.3 million cars for 1 year.

Universities across North America are stepping up to the challenge to eliminate plastic water bottle waste. Many, including Wesleyan, have banned bottled water from campus; however, they still have trouble hydrating guests at large campus events such as Reunion & Commencement, football games, music festivals, etc. Their only options were to rent/ purchase a high cost hydration structure or to break their commitment by purchasing thousands of water bottles… until now.

Wishing Wells provide chilled, filtered water requiring nothing more than ice and a hose connection. From just a handful of Wesleyan events, these lost-cost structures have already saved over 10,500 water bottles. With backing from a Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship seed grant, we’re looking to spread this technology as effectively as possible. With ambitious plans to open-source publish our designs online, partner with Middletown manufacturers, and tour to neighboring Universities/ organizations, we need other students with the same entrepreneurial drive to make this happen.

Apply at wwells.org by November 1. Also check out recent coverage in the Hartford Business Journal and Wesleying, as well as the founders’ first and second PCSE grant reports.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Wesleyan World Wednesdays, the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life, and Academic Affairs present a panel discussion with Wesleyan alum and CT State Epidemiologist Dr. Matthew Cartter,  Prof. Anna Geltzer and Prof. David Constantine, on the public health response to Ebola.

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