Feed on
Posts
Comments

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Caroline MacNeille ’16

Editors note: After running this post in the newsletter on July 23, it came to our attention that we’ve missed two alumni: Kenneth Fuchs ’83 and Liz Friedman ’91. Write to us if there are more!

[Game of Thrones, co-created by D.B. Weiss '93]

Five Seven alumni have been nominated for Emmy Awards this year. Congratulations to all the nominees!

While Shark Tank was nominated for Outstanding Structured Reality Program, its director Kenneth Fuchs ’83 has been specifically nominated for Outstanding Direction of Nonfiction Programming.

Liz Friedman ’91 and Jenji Kohan have been nominated for “Writing for a comedy series” for everyone’s favorite prison comedy, Orange is the New Black.

Game of Thrones received 19 nominations, the most Emmy nominations this year. Nominations include Outstanding Drama Series and Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series. D.B. Weiss ’93 co-created of Game of Thrones and is now a producer and writer.

Mad Men, created and produced by Matthew Weiner ’87, is nominated for Outstanding Drama Series.

Modern Family is nominated for Outstanding Comedy Series. Bill Wrubel ’85 is an executive producer.

Matthew Senreich ’96 is the co-creator and producer of Robot Chicken, which was nominated for Outstanding Short-Format Animated Program.

Maria Santana ’98 has been nominated for a News and Documentary Emmy for Outstanding Coverage of a Breaking News Story in Spanish.

Read more…

Image: from article

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140722-emmy-awards

Related links

[Twitter] follow @WizMatts on Twitter ➞

[Twitter] follow @MariaSantanaCNN on Twitter ➞

[Twitter] follow @GameOfThrones on Twitter ➞

[Twitter] follow @ModernFam on Twitter ➞

[Twitter] follow @MadMen_AMC on Twitter ➞

[Twitter] follow @cyborgturkey on Twitter ➞

[Twitter] follow @kennyfuchs on Twitter ➞

[Twitter] follow @OITNB on Twitter ➞

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Mike White '92]
By Caroline MacNeille ’16

Screenwriter Mike White ’92 swears that creativity looks a lot like sitting on the couch. In this “Academy Originals” video, the man behind School of Rock, Nacho Libre and The Good Girl gives us a glimpse of his two-part creative process:

“Creativity is so much more than making something,” Mike says, sharing 5 tips that every screenwriter should know:

1. Procrastination can actually be productive: “There’s two creative phases. One is kind of more an open phase, and one is more of a closed phase. And the open phase is when you’re just kind of ingesting and taking in… You’re impregnating your brain with an idea and it needs to gestate. It’s like I’m waiting as long as I can before I start writing. On the outside, that looks like me sitting on my couch or watching TV or watching movies or reading books or walking around the neighborhood or picking my butt… It looks like I’m doing nothing.”

2. But when the idea is fully formed, it’s time to jump in: “The closed phase is like this is an idea and now I need to do it. It’s like getting a fever, where you’re like ‘I am going to live and breathe this thing until it’s done.’

Read more…

Image thumb: screenshot from video

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140722-mike-white

#THISISWHY

Related links

Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

We are pleased to announce a new book by Julia Byl, Antiphonal Histories: Resonant Pasts in the Toba Batak Musical Present.

byl blog

 

“Well-written, smart, and honest, Antiphonal Histories is an innovative juxtaposition of historiography, ethnography, musical analysis, and reflexive autobiography. There are also moments of poignant insight, brilliant induction, and hilarity.” —Jeremy Wallach, author of Modern Noise, Fluid Genres: Popular Music in Indonesia, 1997–2001

Positioned on a major trade route, the Toba Batak people of Sumatra have long witnessed the ebb and flow of cultural influence from India, the Middle East, and the West. Living as ethnic and religious minorities within modern Indonesia, Tobas have recast this history of difference through interpretations meant to strengthen or efface the identities it has shaped. Antiphonal Histories examines Toba musical performance as a legacy of global history, and a vital expression of local experience. This intriguingly constructed ethnography searches the palm liquor stand and the sanctuary to show how Toba performance manifests its many histories through its “local music”—Lutheran brass band hymns, gong-chime music sacred to Shiva, and Jimmie Rodgers yodeling. Combining vivid narrative, wide-ranging historical research, and personal reflections, Antiphonal Histories traces the musical trajectories of the past to show us how the global is manifest in the performative moment.

byl collage

Clockwise from top left: a group of men playing at the lapo tuak; ceremonial dancing at a Toba adat ceremony; Martahan Sitohang playing the Toba suling during a performance residency in the Netherlands (photo: Hardoni Sitohang); and a gondang group.

For more details, click here.

Also available as an ebook—check with your favorite ebook retailer.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Phoebe Boyer '89]
By Caroline MacNeille ’16

Phoebe Boyer ’89 has been appointed as the new CEO and President of The Children’s Aid Society, an organization dedicated to helping “children in poverty to succeed and thrive.”

Phoebe has decades of experience managing charitable funds and working towards reform in education. She is currently the executive director of the Robertson Foundation, which delivers a “targeted approach to supporting critical national issues, including education reform.” Previously, she was the executive director of the Tiger Foundation, an organization dedicated to fighting poverty.

Children’s Aid picked Phoebe Boyer after a five-month search to replace Richard Buery, who was CEO from 2009 through 2014. In February, Mayor Bill de Blasio chose Buery to be one of the mayor’s top aides at City Hall.

Boyer comes to Children’s Aid at a time of change for the 160-year-old organization, which provides early education services, after-school programs, and works to turn schools into full-service community hubs. Under Buery, Children’s Aid began developing a new system to track the performance of its programs, putting an emphasis on measuring student outcomes. And in 2012, it opened its first charter school, College Prep Charter School, an elementary school in the South Bronx.

Boyer is well-known in the New York City charter school community as both a fundraiser and as a leader of the movement to expand the sector under the Bloomberg administration.

“Phoebe has long embraced the kind of mission-driven, results-oriented thinking that is a cornerstone of what we’re doing at Children’s Aid,” board chair Mark Edmiston said in a statement.The hire also received an endorsement from Buery, who tweeted that Boyer was a “great choice.”

Read more…

Image: c/o William Moree Photographs

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140721-phoebe-boyer

Related links

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Phoebe Boyer '89]
By Caroline MacNeille ’16

Phoebe Boyer ’89 has been appointed as the new CEO and President of The Children’s Aid Society, an organization dedicated to helping “children in poverty to succeed and thrive.”

Phoebe has decades of experience managing charitable funds and working towards reform in education. She is currently the executive director of the Robertson Foundation, which delivers a “targeted approach to supporting critical national issues, including education reform.” Previously, she was the executive director of the Tiger Foundation, an organization dedicated to fighting poverty.

Children’s Aid picked Phoebe Boyer after a five-month search to replace Richard Buery, who was CEO from 2009 through 2014. In February, Mayor Bill de Blasio chose Buery to be one of the mayor’s top aides at City Hall.

Boyer comes to Children’s Aid at a time of change for the 160-year-old organization, which provides early education services, after-school programs, and works to turn schools into full-service community hubs. Under Buery, Children’s Aid began developing a new system to track the performance of its programs, putting an emphasis on measuring student outcomes. And in 2012, it opened its first charter school, College Prep Charter School, an elementary school in the South Bronx.

Boyer is well-known in the New York City charter school community as both a fundraiser and as a leader of the movement to expand the sector under the Bloomberg administration.

“Phoebe has long embraced the kind of mission-driven, results-oriented thinking that is a cornerstone of what we’re doing at Children’s Aid,” board chair Mark Edmiston said in a statement.The hire also received an endorsement from Buery, who tweeted that Boyer was a “great choice.”

Read more…

Image: c/o William Moree Photographs

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140721-phoebe-boyer

Related links

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Just a quick note of thanks to the following alumni, students, faculty, and friends who donated their time and expertise to the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship in 2013-2014. Your involvement has made our programs stronger, and we look forward to continued collaboration!

Advisory Board
Phoebe Boyer ’89
Carl Byers ’93
Sharon Belden Castonguay
Marcus Chung ’98
Lara Galinsky ’96
Joyce Jacobsen
Ellen Jewett ’81 P’17
Bob Miller P’02 P’99
Kennedy Odede ’12
Robert Patricelli ’61 P’90 P’88
Muzzy Rosenblatt ’87
Ilene Rosenthal ’74 P’17
Rob Rosenthal
Sarah Williams ’88

Peer Advisors
Jason Brandner ’16
Alex Cantrell ’14
Val Demuynck ’16
Alicia Gansley ’15
Marina King ’16
Brent Packer ’15
Maeve Russell ’14
Yekaterina Sapozhnina ’16
Ted Shabecoff ’16
Tanaya Srini ’15
Ariane Turley ’15

Grant Judges
Phoebe Boyer ’89
Ali Chaudhry ’12
Tim Devane ’09
Lexy Funk ’91
Amir Alexander Hasson ’98
Rachel Hines ’82 P’18
Makaela Kingsley ’98
Rob Rosenthal
Maeve Russell ’14
Marc Schleifer ’95
Sarah Williams ’88
Meredith Lobel ’01
David Jay ’04

Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

We are pleased to announce the release of a brand-new edition of The American Shore: Meditations on a Tale of Science Fiction by Thomas M. Disch —- “Angouleme,” with an introduction by Matthew Cheney.

 american shore

A keystone text in literary theory and science fiction The American Shore: Meditations on a Tale of Science Fiction by Thomas M. Disch—“Angouleme” was first published in 1978 to the intense interest of science fiction readers and the growing community of SF scholars. Recalling Nabokov’s commentary on Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin, Roland Barthes’ commentary on Balzac’s Sarazine, and Grabinier’s reading of The Heart of Hamlet, this book-length essay helped prove the genre worthy of serious investigation. The American Shore is the third in a series of influential critical works by Samuel Delany, beginning with The Jewel-Hinged Jaw and Starboard Wine, first published in the late seventies and reissued over the last five years by Wesleyan University Press. Delany was honored with a Pilgrim Award for Science Fiction Scholarship from the Science Fiction Research Association of America. He has also received the Hugo Award, Nebula Award, and the William Whitehead Memorial Award for a lifetime’s contribution to gay and lesbian literature. In 2013, he was named the 31st Damon Knight Memorial Foundation Grand Master by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. This edition of The American Shore includes the author’s corrected text as well as a new introduction by Delany scholar Matthew Cheney. For more details, click here. Also available as an ebook—check with your favorite ebook retailer.

Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

This week’s Throwback Thursday selection is Andrea Werblin’s “Arguing in Public,” from Lullaby for One Fist (2001).

.

werblin TBT

.

.

Arguing in Public

Any plastic flower’s lame reach to heaven is any Dos Equis’
knowledge of terror,
so you go a few rounds of proving emphatically nothing,
grow up prickly and worn
before you’ve gotten a chance to rotten each other the long way.
Couples of this taquería,
I could use you being happier if you wouldn’t mind it,
because the heater emits only flowers
of heat, and the birds caught in the air ducts are shrieking
like his best afternoon
of locking me out and calling the police, & the police laughing.
May you never again call each other jerkass
in a car on a Saturday morning,
while your love and hate deprivatize.
May your foolhearted means
of courting what is over be over now. Structureless as you are,
try thanking your respective bellies
for being potlike, the winter’s weird fingers for a fury
more gracile than all your years alone.

.

.

ANDREA WERBLIN has had poetry published in various print and online journals, including BOOG Reader, EOAGH: A Journal of the Arts, The Massachusetts Review, and Smartish Pace. She has a B.A. from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and an MFA in creative writing from the University of Arizona, Tucson. She currently works as a Creative Director in the Boston area.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Lucas Guilkey '10]
By Aditi Kini ’13

In an interview with Wesconnect, Lucas Guilkey ’10 talks about Dying for Sunlight – a documentary highlighting the horror of indefinite solitary confinement in American prisons. The documentary focuses on the California prisoner hunger strikes, where an “inspiring humanity has arisen out of these conditions of torture: a massive, non-violent civil disobedience for basic human rights.”

The Indiegogo campaign for Dying for Sunlight ends at midnight on Thursday, July 17.

WESCONNECT: You’re currently working on a documentary film on prisoner-led movements against the “living tomb” of indefinite solitary confinement. Where did you get this idea?

LUCAS GUILKEY: Having grown up as a white kid in a privileged, upper-class community, I was always on track to go to college, never to prison as so many working class youth and youth of color are. In high school and Wesleyan, I became politicalized around the issues of systemic racism and white privilege, as my eyes became opened to these parallel universes.

I’ve learned since then that the most effective and powerful movements for social change are led by those most directly impacted. So when 30,000 prisoners in California–one quarter of all state prisoners–went on a coordinated hunger strike last summer against the use of indefinite solitary confinement and in defense of their own humanity, I couldn’t sit idly by.

California incarcerates around 12,000 people in solitary confinement on any given day, and around 3,000 of those are locked in indefinite solitary confinement. In Pelican Bay State Prison, men are isolated in concrete, windowless cells called Security Housing Units (or SHUs) for 22.5 hours a day for up to decades at time. Shane Bauer’s Mother Jones article (Solitary in Iran Nearly Broke Me. Then I Went Inside America’s Prisons) extensively documents that it is flimsy evidence–tattoos, christmas cards, political literature, cultural symbols, and confidential informants–not crimes, that land someone in the SHU indefinitely.

Thousands of prisoners had resorted to killing themselves for basic human rights. I witnessed the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition working tirelessly to amplify their message, but the hunger strikes received relatively little media coverage, especially after the early days of the hunger strike.

I am drawn to this story not only to expose the deep injustices operating in California prisons, but because I am inspired by the humanity that has arisen out of these conditions of torture: a massive, non-violent civil disobedience for basic human rights. As Arturo Castellanos wrote from the SHU, “We prisoners of all races have united to force these changes for future generations.”

I’ve also met countless family members of these SHU prisoners who’ve shared their stories of overcoming their own conditions of isolation and shame. After years of pain, depression, and confusion about having a loved one locked in solitary, they began meeting each other at meetings, rallies, and visits to the prisons. Today they’ve become a powerful political force and the heart and soul of the movement to end indefinite isolation. “My son is a part of me,” told me recently. “Whatever happens to him happens to me.”

These stories of hope in seemingly hopeless situations are of incredible importance to me as we attempt to chart a path out of the major social, political, economic, and environmental crises of our time. As we confront the surveillance state, global warming, and massive economic inequality, I believe we must first be grounded in the ability to recognize the humanity in ourselves and in each other.

WC: Various depictions of prison life in the media (The Farm (1998), and at the moment in popular television – Orange is the New Black) have cultivated the public’s interest in life in prison. How do you see media – and your documentary, in particular – affecting prison reform?

LUCAS: We incarcerate more of our own people than any other country on earth, and this system is largely maintained through the dehumanizing and silencing of people who are incarcerated. In California, for example, reporters have been banned since 1996 from entering prisons without prison officials controlling their visit. Not until 2011, after the first hunger strike, were SHU prisoners even allowed to take a photo of themselves. Therefore, humanizing prisoners in the public sphere is the first step. We’ve seen the the documentary film The House I Live In change the game on the drug war. We’ve seen Solitary Nation from Frontline shine light on the horrors of solitary in Maine. And we’ve seen Orange is the New Black, while fiction, demonstrate to a mainstream audience that prisoners on the inside are just as complicated, flawed human beings as those of us on the outside. These examples show how media and film can shift culture about things we think are inevitable.

For us, we want to show that prisoners voices are at the center of a movement to decarcerate our society–that is, reduce the logic that has us putting more and more people in more and more repressive conditions of confinement. We want to highlight the experiential knowledge of those who’ve endured solitary confinement, and those who’ve endured having their family members locked in solitary confinement. By interweaving their stories with at the analyses of psychologists, historians, and others who’ve studied this system from a big picture perspective we hope to create a well-rounded film that will go to the heart of the question, “What if it was yourself or your family member that was locked in solitary?” and “How did we get to where we are today?”

There is a strong movement to end solitary, and we hope this film will contribute to ending long-term isolation. Furthermore, we see ourselves as part of a larger social movement advocating for a system based on public health, public education, and rehabilitation, not human warehousing. As a sister of someone in the SHU recently said, “You can’t teach someone to do good by torturing them.”

WC: Were there any classes or activities at Wes in particular that furthered your interest in prisoner rights, and human rights globally?

LUCAS: Wesleyan is where I became politicized and gained my tools to analyze and engage with the world. As an anthropology major, I learned to interweave structural analysis of our political and economic systems with engaging individual (including self-reflexive) narratives, and this has informed all of my documentary film work. Anu Sharma’s class “Anthropology and Political Economy” gave me the foundation for the neoliberal period, which undergirded the rise of mass incarceration in the U.S. Jonathan Cutler’s “Paternalism and Social Power” allowed me to think deeply about the role of privilege and power in social movements. And Demetrius Eudell’s strong emphasis on reimagining the human being in the context of neoliberal capitalism, chattel slavery, and the foundation of the the United States influences everything I do today. And those are just a few of my formative moments! I also wouldn’t want to forget the long history of anti-racism and anti-war activism at Wesleyan that is near and dear to my heart.

WC: Any memories of Wes that stand out?

LUCAS: Trying to get the Board of Trustees to divest from weapons companies profiting off of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. We didn’t win, but we raised awareness, got a socially responsible investment committee formed, and learned a lot about the nature of power and how to build effective social movements. That and all the beautiful, intelligent people I got to hang with everyday!

Support “Dying for Sunlight” on Indiegogo…

Image: c/o Lucas Guilkey

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140716-lucas-guilkey

Related links

[Facebook]Lucas Guilkey on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @4amnotes on Twitter ➞

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Lucas Guilkey '10]
By Aditi Kini ’13

In an interview with Wesconnect, Lucas Guilkey ’10 talks about Dying for Sunlight – a documentary highlighting the horror of indefinite solitary confinement in American prisons. The documentary focuses on the California prisoner hunger strikes, where an “inspiring humanity has arisen out of these conditions of torture: a massive, non-violent civil disobedience for basic human rights.”

The Indiegogo campaign for Dying for Sunlight ends at midnight on Thursday, July 17.

WESCONNECT: You’re currently working on a documentary film on prisoner-led movements against the “living tomb” of indefinite solitary confinement. Where did you get this idea?

LUCAS GUILKEY: Having grown up as a white kid in a privileged, upper-class community, I was always on track to go to college, never to prison as so many working class youth and youth of color are. In high school and Wesleyan, I became politicalized around the issues of systemic racism and white privilege, as my eyes became opened to these parallel universes.

I’ve learned since then that the most effective and powerful movements for social change are led by those most directly impacted. So when 30,000 prisoners in California–one quarter of all state prisoners–went on a coordinated hunger strike last summer against the use of indefinite solitary confinement and in defense of their own humanity, I couldn’t sit idly by.

California incarcerates around 12,000 people in solitary confinement on any given day, and around 3,000 of those are locked in indefinite solitary confinement. In Pelican Bay State Prison, men are isolated in concrete, windowless cells called Security Housing Units (or SHUs) for 22.5 hours a day for up to decades at time. Shane Bauer’s Mother Jones article (Solitary in Iran Nearly Broke Me. Then I Went Inside America’s Prisons) extensively documents that it is flimsy evidence–tattoos, christmas cards, political literature, cultural symbols, and confidential informants–not crimes, that land someone in the SHU indefinitely.

Thousands of prisoners had resorted to killing themselves for basic human rights. I witnessed the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition working tirelessly to amplify their message, but the hunger strikes received relatively little media coverage, especially after the early days of the hunger strike.

I am drawn to this story not only to expose the deep injustices operating in California prisons, but because I am inspired by the humanity that has arisen out of these conditions of torture: a massive, non-violent civil disobedience for basic human rights. As Arturo Castellanos wrote from the SHU, “We prisoners of all races have united to force these changes for future generations.”

I’ve also met countless family members of these SHU prisoners who’ve shared their stories of overcoming their own conditions of isolation and shame. After years of pain, depression, and confusion about having a loved one locked in solitary, they began meeting each other at meetings, rallies, and visits to the prisons. Today they’ve become a powerful political force and the heart and soul of the movement to end indefinite isolation. “My son is a part of me,” told me recently. “Whatever happens to him happens to me.”

These stories of hope in seemingly hopeless situations are of incredible importance to me as we attempt to chart a path out of the major social, political, economic, and environmental crises of our time. As we confront the surveillance state, global warming, and massive economic inequality, I believe we must first be grounded in the ability to recognize the humanity in ourselves and in each other.

WC: Various depictions of prison life in the media (The Farm (1998), and at the moment in popular television – Orange is the New Black) have cultivated the public’s interest in life in prison. How do you see media – and your documentary, in particular – affecting prison reform?

LUCAS: We incarcerate more of our own people than any other country on earth, and this system is largely maintained through the dehumanizing and silencing of people who are incarcerated. In California, for example, reporters have been banned since 1996 from entering prisons without prison officials controlling their visit. Not until 2011, after the first hunger strike, were SHU prisoners even allowed to take a photo of themselves. Therefore, humanizing prisoners in the public sphere is the first step. We’ve seen the the documentary film The House I Live In change the game on the drug war. We’ve seen Solitary Nation from Frontline shine light on the horrors of solitary in Maine. And we’ve seen Orange is the New Black, while fiction, demonstrate to a mainstream audience that prisoners on the inside are just as complicated, flawed human beings as those of us on the outside. These examples show how media and film can shift culture about things we think are inevitable.

For us, we want to show that prisoners voices are at the center of a movement to decarcerate our society–that is, reduce the logic that has us putting more and more people in more and more repressive conditions of confinement. We want to highlight the experiential knowledge of those who’ve endured solitary confinement, and those who’ve endured having their family members locked in solitary confinement. By interweaving their stories with at the analyses of psychologists, historians, and others who’ve studied this system from a big picture perspective we hope to create a well-rounded film that will go to the heart of the question, “What if it was yourself or your family member that was locked in solitary?” and “How did we get to where we are today?”

There is a strong movement to end solitary, and we hope this film will contribute to ending long-term isolation. Furthermore, we see ourselves as part of a larger social movement advocating for a system based on public health, public education, and rehabilitation, not human warehousing. As a sister of someone in the SHU recently said, “You can’t teach someone to do good by torturing them.”

WC: Were there any classes or activities at Wes in particular that furthered your interest in prisoner rights, and human rights globally?

LUCAS: Wesleyan is where I became politicized and gained my tools to analyze and engage with the world. As an anthropology major, I learned to interweave structural analysis of our political and economic systems with engaging individual (including self-reflexive) narratives, and this has informed all of my documentary film work. Anu Sharma’s class “Anthropology and Political Economy” gave me the foundation for the neoliberal period, which undergirded the rise of mass incarceration in the U.S. Jonathan Cutler’s “Paternalism and Social Power” allowed me to think deeply about the role of privilege and power in social movements. And Demetrius Eudell’s strong emphasis on reimagining the human being in the context of neoliberal capitalism, chattel slavery, and the foundation of the the United States influences everything I do today. And those are just a few of my formative moments! I also wouldn’t want to forget the long history of anti-racism and anti-war activism at Wesleyan that is near and dear to my heart.

WC: Any memories of Wes that stand out?

LUCAS: Trying to get the Board of Trustees to divest from weapons companies profiting off of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. We didn’t win, but we raised awareness, got a socially responsible investment committee formed, and learned a lot about the nature of power and how to build effective social movements. That and all the beautiful, intelligent people I got to hang with everyday!

Support “Dying for Sunlight” on Indiegogo…

Image: c/o Lucas Guilkey

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140716-lucas-guilkey

Related links

[Facebook]Lucas Guilkey on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @4amnotes on Twitter ➞

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

Log in