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Reblogged from: Center for the Arts. (Go to the original post…)

The Wesleyan Gamelan Ensemble, under the direction of University Professor of Music Sumarsam and Artist in Residence I.M. Harjito, presented classical music of Central Java on November 22, 2014, at World Music Hall. Images by Sandy Aldieri of Perceptions Photography. Click here to view the full album on flickr.

Gamelan: Classical Music of Central Java
Gamelan: Classical Music of Central Java
Gamelan: Classical Music of Central Java
Gamelan: Classical Music of Central Java
Gamelan: Classical Music of Central Java
Gamelan: Classical Music of Central Java

Reblogged from: Center for the Arts. (Go to the original post…)

Sam Friedman ’13 demonstrated some of the many ways that the harmonica has been utilized in the nearly 200 years since its invention, accompanied by piano, guitar, bass, and vocals on November 9, 2014, at The Russell House. Images by Sandy Aldieri of Perceptions Photography. Click here to view the full album on flickr.

Sam Friedman '13 - Just Breathe
Sam Friedman '13 - Just Breathe
Sam Friedman '13 - Just Breathe
Sam Friedman '13 - Just Breathe
Sam Friedman '13 - Just Breathe
Sam Friedman '13 - Just Breathe

Reblogged from: Center for the Arts. (Go to the original post…)

The New England debut of Riffat Sultana and Party took place on November 7, 2014, at Crowell Concert Hall. Images by Sandy Aldieri of Perceptions Photography. Click here to view the full album on flickr.

Riffat Sultana and Party
Riffat Sultana and Party
Riffat Sultana and Party
Riffat Sultana and Party
Riffat Sultana and Party
Riffat Sultana and Party

Reblogged from: Center for the Arts. (Go to the original post…)

Sufi singer Riffat Sultana talked about her experiences as a Muslim woman artist in both America and abroad in Pakistan and India during a conversation on November 6, 2014, at CFA Hall. Images by Sandy Aldieri of Perceptions Photography. Click here to view the full album on flickr.

Tell Your Story: A Conversation with Riffat Sultana and Party
Tell Your Story: A Conversation with Riffat Sultana and Party
Tell Your Story: A Conversation with Riffat Sultana and Party
Tell Your Story: A Conversation with Riffat Sultana and Party

Reblogged from: Class of 2016. (Go to the original post…)

As you are settling into break mode, the office of New Student Orientation would like for you to think, have you always wanted to make a difference in the Wesleyan Community? If you’re answer is yes then now is your chance we are looking for 4 eager and excited Orientation Summer Interns and 35 equally excited and vibrant fall Orientation Leaders.

If you have what it takes to welcome the class of 2019, transfer, visiting and exchange students please apply.

All the information you need including job descriptions & applications are available at http://www.wesleyan.edu/orientation/internapp.html.  Summer Intern Applications are due January 23, 2015 and Orientation Leader Applications are due January 31, 2015.

If you have any questions please feel free to e-mail orientation@wesleyan.edu.

Reblogged from: Green Street Blog. (Go to the original post…)

Hello Friends of Green Street,

Today I’m excited to announce that Green Street has become the Green Street Teaching and Learning Center–Green Street TLC. This structure better represents the work we do in Middletown and also allows us to grow our programs in the arts, math, and sciences for kids, teachers, and our broader community.

Screen Shot 2014-12-17 at 9.40.19 AM

The arts are still very much at the heart of what we do at Green Street. We want to make sure our friends understand that this name change does not change what we’re already doing, it simply better reflects our full scope of work and also opens up new ways for us to grow.

We will continue our Discovery AfterSchool Program, which serves 80 Middletown students in Grades 1-8 each year with diverse classes in the arts, sciences, and math; our Private Lessons Program, and our Green Street-to-Go Residency Program that brings teaching artists into community organizations to engage their clients and residents.

We will build on our programming with the Project to Increase Mastery of Mathematics and Science (PIMMS) who has lived at Green Street for two years now and the CT Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Schools who are approaching their fourth year with Green Street. Science safety workshops, which have served over 200 teachers since my arrival nearly two years ago, and the Intel Math Institute that prepares K-8 teachers for Common Core implementation will continue.

We have linked Wesleyan to the local community for ten years and look forward to an even more rewarding collaboration in the years to come. We want to make sure you know about all the opportunities awaiting you at the Teaching and Learning Center.

For more information on any of our programs, please explore our updated website at  www.wesleyan.edu/greenstreet or come visit us.

Thank you and we look forward to working more with you in the future.

Sara MacSorley
Director, Green Street Teaching and Learning Center

P.S. – It may take a little while to make sure our name is updated everywhere, please be patience as we make the switch and feel free to reach out to us with any questions you may have in the meantime.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Aditi Kini ’13

[Anya Fernald '98]Are you vegan for moral reasons? Do you feel guilty about giving up on vegetarianism? Do you only buy the “humane-raised” meat at the supermarket? Kambucha-drinking, jerky-making, fellow socio-environmentally conscious Wes alumna Anya Fernald ’98 wants to restore meat to its status as a luxury—”delectable, expensive, and rare.” Anya is the co-founder and CEO of Belcampo, an artisanal sustainable-meat company.

In “Elite Meat,” the New Yorker‘s Dana Goodyear profiles Anya’s entrepreneurial endeavor to offer a “delicious—but pricey—solution for guilty pleasures.” Anya thinks the appeal of expensive, sustainable meat will expand the market, not because she will find more rich people—but because “the rest of America is going to decide this is worth it.”

The shop—a butcher case and a counter with six seats—is in Grand Central Market, a covered food court opened in 1917 and filled with sellers of Mexican mole, neon signs for chop suey, and macadamia-nut lattes: the Harrods of Los Angeles. Fernald told me that the first time she saw the place she thought, “Boom, I want to do that. I want to be a brand from the nineteen-twenties, a late-agricultural or pre-industrial brand.” In 1920, she says, people ate four ounces of meat every three or four days; they all had a tub of lard in the cupboard; and their hips were wider than their waists. (Today, the average American male eats 6.9 ounces of meat a day, and women eat 4.4. Lard has all but disappeared, and so have waistlines.)

…to the concerned consumer, Fernald offers broad permission to indulge again. Her animals are raised in seemingly ideal conditions, and die about as calmly as food animals can. The ruminants eat only grass; the omnivores eat grain grown on the farm, supplemented with organic, G.M.O.-free feed that the farm buys. Her handlers practice low-stress stockmanship, gently coaxing the animals into trailers and corrals and into the twenty-thousand-square-foot slaughterhouse she designed in consultation with the animal-welfare expert Temple Grandin.

…“I live in a bubble and I’m trying to create a bubble,” Fernald told me. “I recognize that we’re creating a product that is financially non-viable for a lot of people. But I’m also prepared for when the health impact becomes undeniable and people decide to reprioritize their budgets. I think my bubble’s going to get bigger. Not because I’ll find more rich people—I think more of the rest of America is going to decide this is worth it.”

Read more…

Image: by Carolyn Drake/Panos

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20141217-anya-fernald

#THISISWHY

Related links

[Facebook]add Anya Fernald on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @anyafernald on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Anya Fernald on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Aditi Kini ’13

[Anya Fernald '98]Are you vegan for moral reasons? Do you feel guilty about giving up on vegetarianism? Do you only buy the “humane-raised” meat at the supermarket? Kambucha-drinking, jerky-making, fellow socio-environmentally conscious Wes alumna Anya Fernald ’98 wants to restore meat to its status as a luxury—”delectable, expensive, and rare.” Anya is the co-founder and CEO of Belcampo, an artisanal sustainable-meat company.

In “Elite Meat,” the New Yorker‘s Dana Goodyear profiles Anya’s entrepreneurial endeavor to offer a “delicious—but pricey—solution for guilty pleasures.” Anya thinks the appeal of expensive, sustainable meat will expand the market, not because she will find more rich people—but because “the rest of America is going to decide this is worth it.”

The shop—a butcher case and a counter with six seats—is in Grand Central Market, a covered food court opened in 1917 and filled with sellers of Mexican mole, neon signs for chop suey, and macadamia-nut lattes: the Harrods of Los Angeles. Fernald told me that the first time she saw the place she thought, “Boom, I want to do that. I want to be a brand from the nineteen-twenties, a late-agricultural or pre-industrial brand.” In 1920, she says, people ate four ounces of meat every three or four days; they all had a tub of lard in the cupboard; and their hips were wider than their waists. (Today, the average American male eats 6.9 ounces of meat a day, and women eat 4.4. Lard has all but disappeared, and so have waistlines.)

…to the concerned consumer, Fernald offers broad permission to indulge again. Her animals are raised in seemingly ideal conditions, and die about as calmly as food animals can. The ruminants eat only grass; the omnivores eat grain grown on the farm, supplemented with organic, G.M.O.-free feed that the farm buys. Her handlers practice low-stress stockmanship, gently coaxing the animals into trailers and corrals and into the twenty-thousand-square-foot slaughterhouse she designed in consultation with the animal-welfare expert Temple Grandin.

…“I live in a bubble and I’m trying to create a bubble,” Fernald told me. “I recognize that we’re creating a product that is financially non-viable for a lot of people. But I’m also prepared for when the health impact becomes undeniable and people decide to reprioritize their budgets. I think my bubble’s going to get bigger. Not because I’ll find more rich people—I think more of the rest of America is going to decide this is worth it.”

Read more…

Image: by Carolyn Drake/Panos

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20141217-anya-fernald

#THISISWHY

Related links

[Facebook]add Anya Fernald on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @anyafernald on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Anya Fernald on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

“Picasso and Math”
“Exploring the River”
“Beginning Breakdance”

I know what you might be thinking – Where are these classes in Wesmaps?! Wesleyan students may be disappointed to find that these are not in fact college courses, but rather classes at in the arts, math, and sciences  for children in Middletown at the Green Street Arts Center.

Fortunately for many of the parents on campus, however, Wesleyan faculty and staff receive a discount on afterschool programs for their children at Green Street! Registration for Spring 2015 is now open, and parents can call the front desk  (860-685-7871) to sign up for anywhere between one and five classes a week. They can also sign up for Homework Time, where the kids get a start on their school assignments with help from college student tutors.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

When it comes to gifts, we are taught early on that it’s the thought that counts. We prioritize sentimental value over monetary value, but another factor to consider is a gift’s social value: What are the repercussions of your consumption in communities, economies, and environments around the world? The rise of social entrepreneurship has made it easier to not just be thoughtful in our gift-giving, but to also be impactful, and to purchase goods and services that do double duty as presents for loved ones and investments in social change.

This holiday season, if you’d like to give gifts that keep on giving, why not also support a Wesleyan alum in the process? Here are a few of the many organizations where alumni are helping to make a difference, and where you can find creative and socially-conscious presents:

STYLE

Fed by Threads (Co-Founder Alok Appadurai ’00): American-made clothing crafted from sustainable fabrics. Each item purchases 12 emergency meals for the Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona! Perfect for the humanitarian fashionista who also values job creation, sustainability, and animal rights.

Brooklyn Industries (Co-founder and CEO Lexy Funk ’91):  A cutting-edge retailer that began with messenger bags made from recycled billboards and developed into a visionary brand dedicated to environmental preservation and sustainable design.

Eone Timepieces (Founder & CEO Hyungsoo Kim ’03): beautiful and functional timepieces for the visually impaired, as well as sighted people who’d like to check the time more discretely.

Superego Clothiers (Co-Founders James He ’11 (a.k.a. Jimmi Hundreds) and Tommie Lark Jr. ’12): a streetwear company working with hemp, organic cotton, bamboo and eucalyptus.

Fabindia (Managing Director William Bissell ’88): affordable clothing and household products made from natural and organic materials with traditional techniques and hand-based processes. The company was founded in order to market – and thus preserve – India’s diverse craft traditions by blending indigenous methods with contemporary styles.

Eco-Africa Social Ventures (President and CEO Mufaro Dube ’08 and Development Coordinator Lauren Sonnabend ’08): Beautiful paper crafts made by artisan communities in Zimbabwe. The organization also provides job training, child care, and increased access to education and health services. Every item purchased helps an artisan to support her family.

FOOD

Belcampo Meat Company (CEO Anya Fernald ’98): a source of organic and humane meats with locations around California and an online store. Feed the environmentalist omnivores in your family.

Snowday by Drive Change (Founder Executive Director Jordyn Lexton ’08): a locally-sourced food truck that hires, teaches, and empowers formerly incarcerated youth in NYC. Get some maple grilled cheese with a side of social justice (and even more maple syrup on top).

Café UTEC (Executive Director Gregg Croteau ’93): a Workforce Development and Social Enterprise program at the United Teen Equality Center in Lowell, MA, where proven-risk teens learn to trade poverty and violence for peace and prosperity. Gregg has personally assured me that they’ve got the best roasted eggplant panini in the area.

LEARNING

Work on Purpose by Lara Galinsky ’96, Senior Vice President of Echoing Green: How do you build a career that’s personally satisfying and has a positive social impact? This book is full of resources and inspiration for recent grads or anyone contemplating a career change. Remember: Head + Heart = Hustle.

The Quarter-Life Breakthrough by Adam Smiley Poswolsky: an exhilarating manifesto for millennials seeking meaningful work. This is a great gift for aspiring changemakers who are ready to start taking risks, working hard, making a difference, and even enjoying themselves.

The Buddha Walks Into a Bar… (and later, Into the Office) by Lodro Rinzler ’05: turns lessons in Shambhala Buddhism into an accessible guide to approaching life with mindfulness and compassion.

Winning the Story Wars by Jonah Sachs ’97: a history and how-to of effective storytelling. Conceptualize your role in social media or the marketing industry as modern myth-making and value-shaping for our society — and don’t take that responsibility lightly.

VACATION

Elevate Destinations (Dominique Callimanopulous ’81): a sustainable and philanthropic travel company providing personalized, environmentally-friendly, and socially-conscious trips for individuals, groups, and non-profits. Encourage your favorite globetrotters to swap their next carbon-intensive journey for a trip that supports natural environments and local cultures.

Of course, there are less tangible gifts that support the good work Wes alumni are doing. Volunteer work and donations are the lifeblood of any nonprofit. Consider giving to organizations like SHOFCO, the Minds Foundation, Brighter Dawns, and Maji Safi Group that are making waves around the world, or connect with other Wes-affiliated groups through the WAPPS LinkedIn group.

What are we missing? Send additions to Rosy Capron ’14 or in the comment section below.

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