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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Professor James Lipton]Every year at Commencement, Wesleyan recognizes outstanding teaching with three Binswanger Prizes for Excellence in Teaching. These prizes, made possible by gifts from the family of the late Frank G. Binswanger Sr. Hon. ’85, underscore Wesleyan’s commitment to its scholar-teachers, who are responsible for the university’s distinctive approach to liberal arts education.

Recommendations are solicited from alumni of the last 10 graduating classes, as well as current juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Recipients are chosen by a selection committee of faculty and members of the Alumni Association Executive Committee.

Wesconnect caught up with former Binswanger Prize recipients to discuss their teaching careers and what it means to be recognized for their work.

WESCONNECT: Which professors have had an impact on you? How did that influence your teaching?

JAMES LIPTON: My teaching, I believe, has been deeply influenced by the approach and style of my best teachers. I was especially impressed by the excitement and command of the material shown by my first astronomy and physics teachers in my freshman year in college, and later, in deeper ways, by teachers in analysis, abstract algebra and logic. It is hard to find a unifying characteristic in the diversity of their approaches to teaching other than a capacity to share a sense of wonder for a beautiful subject, and perhaps a constant emphasis on what is commonly called the big picture: how each detail related to the overarching themes of the course and the reasons for studying the material in the first place.

I might add that most of the teachers I have in mind––but not all––had a certain air for presentation, and for reformulating the deeper themes of their courses in ways that addressed the main intuitions involved. New material, however unexpected and innovative, has to be connected if not to what a student already knows, at least to their intuition about the main motives and themes of the subject under study, even if the point is to challenge and disturb that intuition.

One of the points of choosing an academic career is to make learning a permanent feature of one’s life and this has certainly occurred in stimulating ways in mine in seminars and courses taken after my studies were officially over. In particular I am thinking of a course in category theory (a hot topic in mathematics and computer science) taken when I was a postdoc, lectures in the same subject I attended at Wesleyan years later, and recently a drawing course also taken here. Which have been the pivotal points in your teaching career at Wesleyan? There have been a number of moments when I sensed a strong rapport with students in a certain course and a deep connection on their part with the material. Such moments are worth their weight in gold. To this I would add that collaborating with students on senior projects or tutorials has often brought me a special satisfaction and new ways of appreciating the material being studied.

WC: What have been the pivotal points in your teaching career at Wesleyan?

JL: There have been a number of moments when I sensed a strong rapport with students in a certain course and a deep connection on their part with the material. Such moments are worth their weight in gold. To this I would add that collaborating with students on senior projects or tutorials has often brought a special satisfaction and new ways of appreciating the material being studied.

WC: How has your research evolved over the years? What are you working on right now?

JL: I started my research working with a topic in mathematical logic called realizability invented by Stephen Kleene in the 1950’s. I continued studying related material from several standpoints for a number of years. Curiously I am returning to the subject many years later. After this phase in my research life I moved on to the analysis of programming languages based on computing with relations and connected with mathematical logic (so-called declarative programming languages).

WC: What has the Binswanger Prize meant to you?

JL: It means a great deal, a kind of affirmation after years of trying to make my teaching reach goals connected to the issues I just raised above. I want material to reach students and inform their intuitions on the subject of study in a deep way. I want the details to connect with those intuitions and to matter. Receiving the prize has made me think that in some way I have met those objectives. It has also encouraged me to strive further to meet these and other goals. It is an invitation to improve my teaching in as many ways as I can.

Read more…

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20170108-james-lipton

#THISISWHY

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Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)

While students are away on Winter Recess, Wesleyan University received a few inches of snow Jan. 6, 2017.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Majora Carter ’88] Entrepreneur and MacArthur Fellow Majora Carter ’88 is being honored at this year’s International Festival of Arts & Ideas. Carter is receiving the Festival’s Visionary Leadership Award, which is awarded to trailblazers who are impacting the world in significant ways.

The real estate developer, revitalization strategy consultant, and Peabody Award winning broadcaster is being recognized for her green-infrastructure projects in the South Bronx at the 7th annual Award luncheon on January 25th. The event takes place in New Haven and will draw philanthropy, community and civic leaders from across the northeast.

The Festival’s Director of Development Tom Griggs spoke on Carter’s accomplishments, celebrating her “creation and successful implementation of numerous green-infrastructure projects, policies, and inner-city job training and placement systems—including innovative ventures and insights into urban economic developments designed to help move Americans out of poverty.” He draws parallels between her successful revitalization work in the South Bronx and the modern transformations taking place across Connecticut’s biggest cities, showcasing how her business model can be beneficial and applicable to revitalization efforts in other communities. Regularly speaking about urban job opportunities, urban tax credits, entrepreneurial opportunities in the urban center and sustainability, Carter circulates pertinent information for doing business in today’s economic environment.

Watch Majora Carter discuss community transformation in an episode of Wesleyan Alumni Get the Toughest Assignments:

On Tuesday night January 24th, the Festival will be hosting a Community Conversation with Majora in association with ConnCAT and Erik Clemons. The Visionary Leadership Award Luncheon is the next day on January 25th at the Omni New Haven Hotel, followed by a conversation with Majora Carter hosted by the Dean of the Yale School of Architecture, Deborah Berke, at 4pm in the Yale School of Architecture Hastings Hall. This last event is free to the public.

Read more…

Image: c/o IYF

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20170106-majora-carter

#THISISWHY

Related links

[Facebook]Follow Majora Carter on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @majoracarter on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Majora Carter on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Majora Carter ’88] Entrepreneur and MacArthur Fellow Majora Carter ’88 is being honored at this year’s International Festival of Arts & Ideas. Carter is receiving the Festival’s Visionary Leadership Award, which is awarded to trailblazers who are impacting the world in significant ways.

The real estate developer, revitalization strategy consultant, and Peabody Award winning broadcaster is being recognized for her green-infrastructure projects in the South Bronx at the 7th annual Award luncheon on January 25th. The event takes place in New Haven and will draw philanthropy, community and civic leaders from across the northeast.

The Festival’s Director of Development Tom Griggs spoke on Carter’s accomplishments, celebrating her “creation and successful implementation of numerous green-infrastructure projects, policies, and inner-city job training and placement systems—including innovative ventures and insights into urban economic developments designed to help move Americans out of poverty.” He draws parallels between her successful revitalization work in the South Bronx and the modern transformations taking place across Connecticut’s biggest cities, showcasing how her business model can be beneficial and applicable to revitalization efforts in other communities. Regularly speaking about urban job opportunities, urban tax credits, entrepreneurial opportunities in the urban center and sustainability, Carter circulates pertinent information for doing business in today’s economic environment.

Watch Majora Carter discuss community transformation in an episode of Wesleyan Alumni Get the Toughest Assignments:

On Tuesday night January 24th, the Festival will be hosting a Community Conversation with Majora in association with ConnCAT and Erik Clemons. The Visionary Leadership Award Luncheon is the next day on January 25th at the Omni New Haven Hotel, followed by a conversation with Majora Carter hosted by the Dean of the Yale School of Architecture, Deborah Berke, at 4pm in the Yale School of Architecture Hastings Hall. This last event is free to the public.

Read more…

Image: c/o IYF

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20170106-majora-carter

#THISISWHY

Related links

[Facebook]Follow Majora Carter on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @majoracarter on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Majora Carter on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Derrick Holman ’16]Derrick Holman ’16 has been pursuing music full-time since graduating last May. A self-described “rap singer-songwriter from the Bronx” he creates music under the moniker Cornelius, a signature established and developed during his time at Wesleyan.

Most recently, he put out a three-song EP titled Bronx Zoo in preparation of the upcoming release of his first album. In his work Cornelius aims to hone a distinct style and ultimately to break into the mainstream music scene, following in the footsteps of prominent alumni like M.I.A. and MGMT.

Wesconnect caught up with Cornelius to talk about his latest work and future projects:

WESCONNECT: Talk a little about your EP. How did it come together?

DERRICK HOLMAN: The EP has been re-named Bronx Zoo and it came together in support of an album of the same name that I’m finishing up. Originally, the idea was to put out a loose pair of tracks that would lead to the album, hence its initial name “Dirty Vans” as an allusion to a ‘pair’ of things that can tell a story while simultaneously getting you where you’re going. I repackaged the EP because I wanted it to represent my story a bit better and get closer to the direction I really wanted to take with the project.

WC: What can we look forward to with the coming album?

DH: The album is an eclectic mix of personal, introspective tracks, sonically pleasing, fun tracks, and observational storytelling tracks. Together, these tell the story about my experience growing up in the Bronx and around New York City. I think it’s an album that is certainly relatable to anyone that’s kind of felt like an outcast or anyone that’s felt like they were living ‘behind a glass wall’ so to speak, which is where the name comes from. But I think it’ll also be meaningful for people who use music to cope, as inspiration, or because they simply love music as much as I do.

WC: How did social media help in funding this project?

DH: To be honest, the funding process for this was pretty random and chaotic. Elements of it were self-funded while other elements were realized through favors, but the most unexpected element was probably funding the recording process.

Basically, I wrote a Facebook post on my personal account and explained that I had an album’s worth of material that I didn’t know how I was gonna record. The next day, a friend who I hadn’t talked to in years reached out and offered to let me use his basement studio. I was anticipating a makeshift set-up that would just let me get the job done, but it turned out to be a professional studio that he’d built himself and we ended up recording the entire album, minus one track, in a single day. So many thanks go to Louis Sansano because he almost single-handedly made the album happen from that perspective.

WC: In what ways were you involved in music while at Wesleyan, and how do these experiences inform your current work?

DH: I think the most important experiences at Wes were working with friends and collaborators, orchestrating concerts and events like Spring Fling and the VIBES Festival, and performing at a number of shows. Working at Red Feather with people like David Stouck ’15, Ismael Coleman ’15, Oscar Parajon ’16, and Mikah Feldman-Stein ’16, among many many others, gave me a greater appreciation for the music-making process and reminds me how important it is to have a passionate team of people around you.

It was also important to me to stay connected with people like Rhys Langston ’16 and Kai Leshne ’16 because they were – and are – major supporters and inspirations. There’s a lot more people that could and should be named but hopefully this won’t be the last time I get to answer questions like these.

Listen to Bronx Zoo here…

Image: By Ani Acopian ’16

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20170102-derrick-holman

Related links

[Facebook]Like Cornelius Plus on Facebook ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Derrick Holman on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Derrick Holman ’16]Derrick Holman ’16 has been pursuing music full-time since graduating last May. A self-described “rap singer-songwriter from the Bronx” he creates music under the moniker Cornelius, a signature established and developed during his time at Wesleyan.

Most recently, he put out a three-song EP titled Bronx Zoo in preparation of the upcoming release of his first album. In his work Cornelius aims to hone a distinct style and ultimately to break into the mainstream music scene, following in the footsteps of prominent alumni like M.I.A. and MGMT.

Wesconnect caught up with Cornelius to talk about his latest work and future projects:

WESCONNECT: Talk a little about your EP. How did it come together?

DERRICK HOLMAN: The EP has been re-named Bronx Zoo and it came together in support of an album of the same name that I’m finishing up. Originally, the idea was to put out a loose pair of tracks that would lead to the album, hence its initial name “Dirty Vans” as an allusion to a ‘pair’ of things that can tell a story while simultaneously getting you where you’re going. I repackaged the EP because I wanted it to represent my story a bit better and get closer to the direction I really wanted to take with the project.

WC: What can we look forward to with the coming album?

DH: The album is an eclectic mix of personal, introspective tracks, sonically pleasing, fun tracks, and observational storytelling tracks. Together, these tell the story about my experience growing up in the Bronx and around New York City. I think it’s an album that is certainly relatable to anyone that’s kind of felt like an outcast or anyone that’s felt like they were living ‘behind a glass wall’ so to speak, which is where the name comes from. But I think it’ll also be meaningful for people who use music to cope, as inspiration, or because they simply love music as much as I do.

WC: How did social media help in funding this project?

DH: To be honest, the funding process for this was pretty random and chaotic. Elements of it were self-funded while other elements were realized through favors, but the most unexpected element was probably funding the recording process.

Basically, I wrote a Facebook post on my personal account and explained that I had an album’s worth of material that I didn’t know how I was gonna record. The next day, a friend who I hadn’t talked to in years reached out and offered to let me use his basement studio. I was anticipating a makeshift set-up that would just let me get the job done, but it turned out to be a professional studio that he’d built himself and we ended up recording the entire album, minus one track, in a single day. So many thanks go to Louis Sansano because he almost single-handedly made the album happen from that perspective.

WC: In what ways were you involved in music while at Wesleyan, and how do these experiences inform your current work?

DH: I think the most important experiences at Wes were working with friends and collaborators, orchestrating concerts and events like Spring Fling and the VIBES Festival, and performing at a number of shows. Working at Red Feather with people like David Stouck ’15, Ismael Coleman ’15, Oscar Parajon ’16, and Mikah Feldman-Stein ’16, among many many others, gave me a greater appreciation for the music-making process and reminds me how important it is to have a passionate team of people around you.

It was also important to me to stay connected with people like Rhys Langston ’16 and Kai Leshne ’16 because they were – and are – major supporters and inspirations. There’s a lot more people that could and should be named but hopefully this won’t be the last time I get to answer questions like these.

Listen to Bronx Zoo here…

Image: By Ani Acopian ’16

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20170102-derrick-holman

Related links

[Facebook]Like Cornelius Plus on Facebook ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Derrick Holman on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: ITS System Announcements. (Go to the original post…)

ITS is working on an issue which has disrupted many services including WFS.  Some are offline and others are very slow.  We are in the process of restoring them now while we continue to research the root cause.

Reblogged from: Special Collections & Archives at Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

arvf_19_016_001

Here is the Browning Society, 1873-1874. I do not know anything about this group other than that is what is written and typed on the back of the photograph. During the late 19th and into the 20th century, clubs and societies formed to study the work of Robert Browning. The Wesleyan Argus has several references to students reading Browning under the direction of Professor and University Librarian Caleb T. Winchester Class of 1869, but does not mention the Browning Society. As Browning wrote, quoting his wife Elizabeth Barrett Browning, “‘Poets pour us wine–. ‘” Cheers!

Reblogged from: Center for the Arts. (Go to the original post…)

The Wesleyan University Jazz Orchestra and Jazz Ensembles performed an end of the semester concert on Friday, December 9, 2016 in Crowell Concert Hall.

Photos by Sandy Aldieri of Perceptions Photography. Click here to view the entire album on Flickr.

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Reblogged from: Center for the Arts. (Go to the original post…)

Students of Adjunct Assistant Professors of Music B. Balasubrahmaniyan and David Nelson performed a recital of music from the Karnatak tradition of South India on Wednesday, December 7, 2016 in the World Music Hall.

Photos by Sandy Aldieri of Perceptions Photography. Click here to view the entire album on Flickr.

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