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Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

When asked about his favorite poem, Michael Rothenburg replied with “Hymnus Ad Patrem Sinensis” by Philip Whalen from The Collected Poems of Philip Whalen.

Hymnus Ad Patrem Sinensis

I praise those ancient Chinamen
Who left me a few words,
Usually a pointless joke or a silly question
A line of poetry drunkenly scrawled on the margin of a quick
splashed picture—bug, leaf,
caricature of Teacher
on paper held together now by little more than ink
& their own strength brushed momentarily over it

Their world & several others since
Gone to hell in a handbasket, they knew it—
Cheered as it whizzed by—
& conked out among the busted spring rain cherryblossom winejars
Happy to have saved us all.

“Hymnus Ad Patrem Sinensis” is often cited as one of Whalen’s greatest poems. It is certainly the most anthologized. It reminds us of impermanence and lineage, the debt we owe to the poets who preceded us and inspired us with their work, poets who showed us generosity in their teachings. It also suggests that we should not take ourselves too seriously.

Michael Rothenberg


 

Whalen Cover

Philip Whalen (1923–2002) was an influential Beat poet and the author of dozens of books of novels and poetry, including On Bear’s Head, The Diamond Noodle, and Overtime. Michael Rothenberg is one of the literary executors of Whalen’s estate, and the editor of www.bigbridge.org. Also the editor of major volumes of selected poetry by Joanne Kyger, David Meltzer, and Edward Dorn, he lives north of San Francisco.

 

Be sure to check out our new poetry!

poetry

Common Sense (Ted Greenwald)

Age of Reasons: Uncollected Poems 1969–1982 (Ted Greenwald)

Azure: Poems and Selections from the “Livre” (Stéphane Mallarmé)

Fauxhawk (Ben Doller)

Scarecrow (Robert Fernandez)

The Book of Landings (Mark McMorris)

A Sulfur Anthology (edited by Clayton Eshleman)

Reblogged from: Class of 2016. (Go to the original post…)

The Cap and Gown Loaner Program is designed to assist students who are unable to purchase a cap and gown set for Commencement.  Priority is given to aid-eligible students. It should be noted that supplies are limited, and certain sizes may not be available.

Any student who did not pre-register for a cap and gown loaner program can stop by the Usdan Administration office beginning Tuesday, May 3, at 9am to find out if any caps and gowns are still available.

A $40 cash deposit is required and will be refunded immediately upon return of the cap and gown.

The program ends on Wednesday, May 4, at 3pm.

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

Dear Students

The New Student Orientation program is now seeking performers for In the Company of Others 2016. This important peer theater piece is a central aspect of the New Student Orientation. In the Company of Others is a time when sophomores, juniors and seniors are able to share their experiences with new students in the hopes of sparking conversation regarding what it means to live in a diverse community. This year, we are particularly looking for applicants who can share experiences around issues of identity. If you are interested in being a performer for this program, please complete the following interest form.

Please submit this application using this link no later than Wednesday, May 11th by 5:00pm. If you have any questions, please contact Elisa Cardona in the Office of New Student Orientation.

 

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)

Busy afternoon at Usdan University Center’s Huss Courtyard, April 28. #Wesleyan

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)

Forty-six thesis and research students presented 36 posters during the Psychology Research Poster Presentation April 28 in Beckham Hall. The 10th annual event allowed the students to share their research and ongoing studies with peers and faculty from the Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division.

Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

When asked about her favorite poem, Sarah Blake replied with “Etymology of an Untranslated Cervix” by Monica Ong from Silent Anatomies.

 

ETYMOLOGY of an UNTRANSLATED CERVIX

In Rufumbira, the local language here in Kisoro, there is no word for cervix,
and the word vagina is a shameful, dirt word, rarely uttered. -Erin Cox, MD

This space between two entries
I claim it.

When it (she) is blotted out with black marker
I say it, I name it.

But under these volcano peaks, I am locked out in English.

Cells rupture. Quietly.
A carcinoma colony creeping in her blank space. Spreads.

What if dysplasia simply meant
to displease?

The interpreter asks

Why do they want to go down there,
to that dirty, shameful place?

What is the point of wailing horns, of fighting
a fire with no address?

This dialect was not designed for her.

On the Western shore, I can spell it out, letter by letter
print a scan and map every tumor’s point of entry,

conduct daily surveillance on each tendril
until it is white with radioactive surge.

But what about her tongue?

Absent, unable to make real
her body, written in silence.

Danger: (   ) is waiting in red,
The monster’s shadow, taller and hungrier than the monster itself.

Ink spilled. Bleeding.

I chose “Etymology of an Untranslated Cervix” because I love the intersection of the body and language, multiple languages, the failure of language. Recently I’ve been focused on threats that bodies face, sometimes women’s bodies especially, and this struck me as a strange threat–not causing harm and yet fundamentally an attack on women’s bodies, even if in avoidance, in denial. I’m usually thinking about the faulty space between signifier and signified, but here, a situation where there is actually no signifier. What becomes of the signified then? This a part of my body I am supposed to reach up and touch once a month to check that my IUD strings are in place. I feel a sudden emptiness there without language. I love this poem that reclaims it so forcefully and beautifully.
Sarah Blake

 

Silent Anatomies
96 pp. 7.5 x 10″
$19.95 paper
978-1-888553-69-7
Kore Press
February 2015


blake_mrwest

Sarah Blake is the founder of the online writing tool Submittrs, an editor at Saturnalia Books, and a recipient of an NEA Literature Fellowship. Her poetry has appeared in Boston Review, Drunken Boat, FIELD, and The Threepenny Review. She lives outside Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She is the author of Mr. West, published in 2015 by Wesleyan University Press. You can visit her website here.

Be sure to check out our new poetry!

poetry

Common Sense (Ted Greenwald)

Age of Reasons: Uncollected Poems 1969–1982 (Ted Greenwald)

Azure: Poems and Selections from the “Livre” (Stéphane Mallarmé)

Fauxhawk (Ben Doller)

Scarecrow (Robert Fernandez)

The Book of Landings (Mark McMorris)

A Sulfur Anthology (edited by Clayton Eshleman)

Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

Celebrating the legendary studio musicians of Jamaican popular music through personal photographs and interviews

While singers, producers, and studio owners have become international icons, but many of the musicians who were essential to shaping the sound of Jamaican music have remained anonymous. Words of Our Mouth: Pioneering Musicians of Ska, Rocksteady, Reggae, and Dancehall, complete with 98 color photographs, is the first book devoted to the studio musicians who were central to Jamaica’s popular music explosion. Bilby delves into the full spectrum of Jamaican music, from traditional and folk genres, such as Mento, Poco, and Buru, to the popular urban styles of ska, rocksteady, and reggae. Photographic portraits and interview excerpts (with such musical pioneers as Prince Buster, Robbie Shakespeare, Sly Dunbar, Lee “Scratch” Perry, and many of Bob Marley’s early musical collaborators) provide new insights into the birth of Jamaican popular music in the recording studios of Kingston, Jamaica in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. The book illustrates how players of “traditional” Jamaican music and lesser-known singers have made fundamental and wide-ranging contributions to the music. Appendices include a recommended listening list, a bibliography of interviews and field recordings, and a glossary of terms.

bilby wordsofourmouth

Kenneth Bilby is an ethnomusicologist, writer, and lifelong student of Jamaican music. He is the former director of research at the Center for Black Research at Columbia College Chicago and currently a research associate at the Smithsonian Institution. Author of True-Born Maroons and coauthor of Caribbean Currents: Caribbean Music from Rumba to Reggae, his collection of field recordings of Jamaican traditional music is one of the largest in the world.

“Bilby celebrates his roots in Jamaica in this magnificent book through beautiful photographs and interviews with musicians. Bilby unveils the backstory of Jamaican music, and his work will be cherished by all who love Jamaican music.”
—William Ferris, author of Give My Poor Heart Ease: Voices of the Mississippi Blues

“Bilby doesn’t just tell the story that’s never been told—delivering an homage to the heroes who helped shape Jamaican music—he lets these heroes tell the story in their own words, writing their own chapter in history.”
—Baz Dreisinger, producer and writer of Black & Blue: Legends of the Hip-Hop Cop and Rhyme & Punishment

“An essential work of Jamaican musical scholarship. The interviews are engrossing on multiple levels. Our understanding of the black musics of the New World would have fewer gaps in it if there were more of the kind of thorough oral history that Bilby does here. He proves himself to be not merely a good collector but a good listener.”
—John Jeremiah Sullivan, author of Pulphead

May

256 pp., 7 x 10”

Paper, $29.95 x

978-0-8195-7588-3

 

eBook, $23.99 Y

978-0-8195-7604-0

Reblogged from: Class of 2016. (Go to the original post…)

Passes are on sale now for $30 at the Usdan box office, open Tuesday – Saturday from 10am-4:30pm– you can also charge passes to your student account. Tickets will be sold until Friday May 5th, so be sure to get them soon! You must have a Class of 2016 WesID to purchase a ticket. If you have any questions or concerns, please stop by or email the SALD Office (located in Usdan), or email Ellen Paik at epaik@wesleyan.edu.

Guest Passes will start going on sale on Tuesday May 3rd and will also be sold until Friday May 5th. Guest Passes will be $30, and will grant guests access to the following events: the Kick-Off Carnival, Outing Day at Camp Wes, and Beach Day. Guest Passes must be purchased by a Senior Host, and cannot be transferred to other people. Senior Hosts will pick up Guess Pass wristbands on behalf of guests during wristband-pickup times (TBD). Guests must bring a current WesID or a valid state or federal ID (passport) with them to check into events, and must check in with their Senior Hosts. Guest Passes are limited and will be sold on a first-come, first-serve basis.

The weekend before Senior Week, you will exchange your ticket for a Senior Week wristband that you will wear for the full week. This wristband will be your entry to any and all Senior Week events (with the exception of first-come, first-serve events). Events include a Kick-Off Carnival, Outing Day at Camp Wes, a trip to SkyZone, Beach Day, and Spring Formal, with more events to be announced soon…

The Senior Class Officers have made every effort to make Senior Week as inclusive and affordable as possible. We are incredibly thrilled to soon announce our finalized schedule, and hope that you’re as excited as we are to celebrate our Wesleyan experience together!

All the best,
Senior Class Officers

Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

When asked about his favorite poem, Robert Fernandez replied with “I dwell in Possibility – (466)” by Emily Dickinson.

 

I dwell in Possibility – (466)

I dwell in Possibility –
A fairer House than Prose –
More numerous of Windows –
Superior – for Doors –

Of Chambers as the Cedars –
Impregnable of eye –
And for an everlasting Roof
The Gambrels of the Sky –

Of Visitors – the fairest –
For Occupation – This –
The spreading wide my narrow Hands
To gather Paradise –

This is one of my favorite poems. I think that Dickinson here is thinking about the question of being. It’s not just the poem that dwells in possibility, it’s the person. The person has the potential to dwell poetically. What would that mean? We’re still in a house, a structure—like the poem, a place of laws and limits, possibility partitioned off, diverted into channels—but above us recede the “Gambrels of the Sky,” a void that fills us with the sense that anything is possible. Kierkegaard, seizing on Christ’s assertion that “with God all things are possible,” noted that “God is that all things are possible, and that all things are possible is the existence of God.” The poet has to break with the reified, prosaic supports and repetitions of the world, which exist to make us feel safe and to keep things productive, into the exposure of this “fair” (meaning pleasing to the sight, beautiful,  bright, clear) place of poetry, a place made beautiful and bright because resonant with possibility, the divine. This is the human in its capacity to exist for and toward the unknown, new truth and new light. Dwelling poetically is dwelling in the dread and wonder of this exposed place and affirming it. Dickinson here speaks to poetry’s relationship to being, to what it means to be human (to see possibility and disclose the unknown), thus situating a radical thinking of being and the event, the seer’s work, at the center of American poetry.
Robert Fernandez


fernandez scarecrow

Robert Fernandez is the author of We Are Pharaoh and Pink Reef, the cotranslator of Azure: Poems Stéphane Mallarmé, and Scarecrow, published by the Wesleyan University Press in February 2016. He has won a Gertrude Stein Award for Innovative Poetry and a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. He lives in Lincoln, Nebraska.

 

Be sure to check out our new poetry!

poetry

Common Sense (Ted Greenwald)

Age of Reasons: Uncollected Poems 1969–1982 (Ted Greenwald)

Azure: Poems and Selections from the “Livre” (Stéphane Mallarmé)

Fauxhawk (Ben Doller)

Scarecrow (Robert Fernandez)

The Book of Landings (Mark McMorris)

A Sulfur Anthology (edited by Clayton Eshleman)

Reblogged from: Class of 2016. (Go to the original post…)

grading mode change formThe last day to withdraw from full-semester and second-quarter classes for the Spring 2016 semester is Wednesday, April 27.  Completed forms are due in the Registrar’s Office by 5:00 p.m. and must include the following signatures: instructor, faculty advisor, and class dean.

If you are thinking about withdrawing from a course:

  • Do use this time to talk to your professors, your advisors, and me about your concerns. If you can’t make my drop-ins, please email me at dphillips@wesleyan.edu or call me at x2757 to schedule an appointment.
  • Do make sure you are taking advantage of all the resources available to you.
  • Do get the signatures of your instructor and advisor on your drop/add form. I cannot sign for either without his or her permission, so please save yourself the trouble of waiting to see me during drop-ins just for me to tell you that.
  • Do not wait until Wednesday at 4:00 p.m. to see me or you may find yourself waiting in a very long line!

Drop-in Hours: M 2-3; Tu 3-4; W 5-7; Th 11-12; F 2-4

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