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Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Kate Weiner ’15, coordinator of this semester’s Food Justice Workshop Series, invites you to a public lecture by Tracie McMillan, Wesleyan’s 2014 Koeppel Journalism Fellow. The talk – on Food as a Social Issue – will be Tuesday, April 22, at 7 p.m. in Downey 113.

Tracie McMillan Flyer

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

startingblocStartingBloc seeks the next generation of Social Innovators! For over eight years, StartingBloc has helped social innovators address the most pressing global challenges of our time by giving them the skills and the tools they need to maximize their impact. Our signature leadership development program, the StartingBloc Fellowship exposes young leaders to new models for achieving social impact. The Fellowship begins with a transformative five-day Institute for Social Innovation, which is the gateway to the Fellowship. The StartingBloc community currently consists of 1900 Fellows representing more than 221 colleges and over 55 countries. The application to the 2014 Boston StartingBloc Conference is now open. Learn more about the Fellowship, and apply online

StartingBloc will also be hosting a New York Conference in August, check the website often to take advantage of when the application goes live.

And check out this list of past StartingBloc Fellows who hailed from Wesleyan:

Raghu Appasani

Adam Poswolsky

Elizabeth Ghormley

Bonnie Oliva

Mira Wijayanti

Rhoda Tamakloe

Micaela Gutierrez

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Anne Field '77]When Anne Field ’77 interviewed Alok Appadurai ’00 about Fed By Threads, his social enterprise and all-American clothing line, she had no idea that he shared his alma mater with her.

It wasn’t until she read the Wesconnect article on Alok did she make the Wes connection. Read her article for her blog “Not Only For Profit” on Forbes, and continue to keep your eyes peeled for those many Wes connections. You never know where they may be lurking.

Like all startups, social enterprises pivot. But that can involve expanding their social mission, not just rejiggering their business model. And sometimes the results surprise even the founders.

A case in point is Fed By Threads. The Tucson-based social enterprise, founded about two years ago by Alok Appadurai and his partner Jade Beall, began as a way to help groups that feed hungry Americans. The idea: design and make clothing and, for every item sold, donate $1 to an organization to help cover the costs of providing emergency meals.

…Appadurai knows that he might have an easier time, marketing-wise, if he hadn’t expanded the mission. Still, as of now, according to Appadurai, the company has contributed to 125,484 meals, donating $1 per item sold to the Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona and to Feeding America , a national hunger relief organization. “We want to have a national and local impact,” he says.

Read more…

Image: c/o Anne Field

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140423-field-appadurai

Related links

[Twitter] follow @AlokAppadurai on Twitter ➞

[Twitter] follow @annearfannearf on Twitter ➞

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Anne Field '77]When Anne Field ’77 interviewed Alok Appadurai ’00 about Fed By Threads, his social enterprise and all-American clothing line, she had no idea that he shared his alma mater with her.

It wasn’t until she read the Wesconnect article on Alok did she make the Wes connection. Read her article for her blog “Not Only For Profit” on Forbes, and continue to keep your eyes peeled for those many Wes connections. You never know where they may be lurking.

Like all startups, social enterprises pivot. But that can involve expanding their social mission, not just rejiggering their business model. And sometimes the results surprise even the founders.

A case in point is Fed By Threads. The Tucson-based social enterprise, founded about two years ago by Alok Appadurai and his partner Jade Beall, began as a way to help groups that feed hungry Americans. The idea: design and make clothing and, for every item sold, donate $1 to an organization to help cover the costs of providing emergency meals.

…Appadurai knows that he might have an easier time, marketing-wise, if he hadn’t expanded the mission. Still, as of now, according to Appadurai, the company has contributed to 125,484 meals, donating $1 per item sold to the Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona and to Feeding America , a national hunger relief organization. “We want to have a national and local impact,” he says.

Read more…

Image: c/o Anne Field

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140423-field-appadurai

Related links

[Twitter] follow @AlokAppadurai on Twitter ➞

[Twitter] follow @annearfannearf on Twitter ➞

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[The Bradley, by Hyungsoo Kim '02]The BBC covered Hyungsoo Kim ’02 and the Bradley, a watch for the blind. Named after Lieutenant Bradley Snyder, a Paralympian gold medallist who lost his sight in Afghanistan, the Bradley is a favorite in London’s Design Museum’s Design of the Year contest, and surprisingly, is mostly being bought by sighted people.

The Bradley was created in collaboration with RISD designers Amanda Sim ’08, David Zacher and others. The original $40,000 ask on Kickstarter was met with incredible enthusiasm – amounting to over $594,000 in donations.

With the watch now named the Bradley, there was an appeal on Kickstarter, the crowdfunding website, in July last year – 3,681 people from 65 different countries backed the project, donating a total of $594,602 (£357,290). It will be available for sale from May in the US, with the UK and Europe likely to follow later.

A further 1,000 people have since pre-ordered the watch online but only a tiny fraction of those – Kim estimates between 1-2% – are visually impaired.

The watch is now among the favourites in the 76 nominations for the Designs of the Year contest at London’s Design Museum. The nomination has already led to interest from European retailers. There’s an obvious gimmick for selling to sighted people – you can check the time in a social or work setting without appearing rude.

“It bridges the gap between the disabled and the non-disabled,” says [Lieutenant Bradley] Snyder.

Read more…

Image: from article

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140422-hyungsoo-kim

#THISISWHY

Related links

[Twitter] follow @eonetimepieces on Twitter➞

[Facebook] Like Eone Timepieces on Facebook ➞

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[The Bradley, by Hyungsoo Kim '02]The BBC covered Hyungsoo Kim ’02 and the Bradley, a watch for the blind. Named after Lieutenant Bradley Snyder, a Paralympian gold medallist who lost his sight in Afghanistan, the Bradley is a favorite in London’s Design Museum’s Design of the Year contest, and surprisingly, is mostly being bought by sighted people.

The Bradley was created in collaboration with RISD designers Amanda Sim ’08, David Zacher and others. The original $40,000 ask on Kickstarter was met with incredible enthusiasm – amounting to over $594,000 in donations.

With the watch now named the Bradley, there was an appeal on Kickstarter, the crowdfunding website, in July last year – 3,681 people from 65 different countries backed the project, donating a total of $594,602 (£357,290). It will be available for sale from May in the US, with the UK and Europe likely to follow later.

A further 1,000 people have since pre-ordered the watch online but only a tiny fraction of those – Kim estimates between 1-2% – are visually impaired.

The watch is now among the favourites in the 76 nominations for the Designs of the Year contest at London’s Design Museum. The nomination has already led to interest from European retailers. There’s an obvious gimmick for selling to sighted people – you can check the time in a social or work setting without appearing rude.

“It bridges the gap between the disabled and the non-disabled,” says [Lieutenant Bradley] Snyder.

Read more…

Image: from article

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140422-hyungsoo-kim

#THISISWHY

Related links

[Twitter] follow @eonetimepieces on Twitter➞

[Facebook] Like Eone Timepieces on Facebook ➞

Reblogged from: Jewish and Israel Studies Blog. (Go to the original post…)

Samuel Kassow, the Charles H. Northam Professor of History at Trinity College, will deliver this year’s Samuel and Dorothy Frankel Memorial Lecture.  Professor Kassow will speak on “Time Capsules in the Rubble: The Secret Archive of the Warsaw Ghetto.”

April 28, 8PM RUSSELL HOUSERingelblum archive

Within months of the start of World War II, the historian Emmanuel Ringelblum established a secret archive called Oneg Shabbat, “the Sabbath pleasure.” Over the years, Ringelblum and his associates would document the life and death in the Warsaw ghetto. It was, as Professor Samuel Kassow argues, “the biggest example of cultural resistance during WWII.” Between 1940 and 1943, members of Oneg Shabbat group buried thousands of documents in milk cans and tin boxes. Only some were recovered.

Professor Kassow is the author of many books including, most recently, Who will Write our History: Emanuel Ringelblum and the Oyneg Shabes Archive.  In 2010, he was elected a member of the American Academy of Jewish Research.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

brighter dawns 2014Tasmiha Khan ’12 is founder of Brighter Dawns, a charitable organization that provides preventative care and health education to lessen health disparities in impoverished communities of Bangladesh. In the 2013 Brighter Dawns annual report, Tasmiha writes:

Thank you for supporting Brighter Dawns! Over this last year, you’ve helped us make a difference in the lives of people in Khalishpur, Bangladesh – we would like to take this moment to remind you that you’re changing lives for the better, and we want to let you know just how much that means.

In 2013, we launched Project RENEW, an initiative using a maintenance-oriented approach to addressing water and sanitation issues. We also saw our biggest year yet in contributions through donations, which will help us further expand and improve upon our projects in Bangladesh.

Read more about Brighter Dawns and Tasmiha’s work, including ways that you can get involved as a volunteer, in the latest newsletter.

 

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

SOCAP OPENThe annual Social Capital Markets (SOCAP) Conference connects leading global innovators – investors, foundations, institutions and social entrepreneurs – to build the market at the intersection of money and meaning. This is the premier event for social entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs looking to build the new economy and use money as an engine of social change.

In 2013, SOCAP founder Tim Freundlich ’90 donated two tickets which were awarded to Wesleyan alumni Raghu Appasani ’12 and Rachel Lindsay ’04. Stay tuned for an announcement about SOCAP14 tickets for GOLD alumni (graduates of the last decade) this coming summer. The conference will take place September 2-5 in Fort Mason San Francisco.

In the meantime, the Patricelli Center is pleased to announce that The Gratitude Network is offering 150 outstanding entrepreneurs a scholarship to attend SOCAP14, along with other perks and prizes. Awards will be in the categories of education, global health, and community development and will include funding, ongoing mentorship, and publicity. Applications are due June 15 at http://bit.ly/1noXQo5.

Finally, SOCAP is seeking your ideas for 2014 conference topics. Submit your thoughts on SOCAP OPEN by May 25. If your topic is selected and you are invited to lead your session, you will be offered a free conference ticket.

If you’ve never practiced Bikram or hot yoga you might think that it’s either absurd or impossible to take a 90-minute yoga class in 100 degree heat. Surprisingly, it’s neither. Bikram yoga is a 26-posture beginner sequence selected from Hatha Yoga by Bikram Choudhury. Classes are 90 minutes long and take place in a room set to 105 degrees Fahrenheit and 40% humidity. The heat, in addition to mimicking the weather in much of India where yoga originated; is also the temperature at which soft tissue deforms, which enhances your body’s capacity for strength and flexibility. A consistent Bikram yoga practice has been associated with numerous benefits including: improved flexibility, strength and posture for the body as well as greater mental focus and clarity.

Since opening in 2012, Bikram Yoga Middletown has been the yoga destination for many in the Wesleyan community.  Faculty, staff, alumni and students have all been flocking to the local studio. As an alumna and former Wesleyan staff member, my Wes pride is such that I want to be where other Wesleyan folk are!  I’ve been practicing Bikram for a little over a year. I started last January with the 30-day special and thought I’d practice for a few months as a respite from my usual workout regime of running, aerobic classes and weightlifting. With each class my desire to get back in the hot room grew, until I was fully entrenched in a regular practice of five to six days per week.  After a while, despite feeling as though I needed to supplement my yoga practice with other workouts, I no longer enjoyed other exercise. Each time I went for a run, or to an aerobics class I felt unsatisfied. Not only did those activities no longer challenge my body, but they also failed to calm my mind in the way that yoga did. I have come to accept that Bikram is enough for me. I feel a sense of physical and mental stability that I have never felt with other exercise.  And though it may seem far-reaching to say so, I feel that my Bikram practice has given me confidence in my ability to endure, to endure difficult spaces and challenging postures, to face my fears and confront my insecurities. I feel grateful to have found an activity that I can do well into my old age and if I get sick or injured.

The most recent crew to jump on the Bikram bandwagon is the Wesleyan Baseball Team. On the encouragement of teammate Matthew Sorkin ’15, several members signed up for the studio’s introductory offer of 30 days for $30.  Matthew’s mom is a longtime Bikram practitioner and one day he decided to join her in class. “I immediately could feel the health benefits after going to several classes and I got addicted. Then, I started doing Bikram with my friends from home as a fun way to work out together.”

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I’ve taken several classes with some of the members the Wesleyan Baseball team and each time they filled the classes with their team discipline, infectious energy and sweaty bodies. I was curious about how they liked the practice and what effect they thought it would have on their season. Wesleyan juniors, Matthew Sorkin, Sam Goodwin-Boyd and Nicholas Cooney all agreed to answer questions for this post.  All three said they prefer wearing as little as possible in the hot room, either compression or spandex shorts and advise wearing a headband or having something to help with sweat in the eyes. Matt sold the idea to the team as a new workout they could do together. Though he didn’t expect to come back for a second class because, he thought he, “was going to puke afterwards,” Sam’s favorite part about the practice is that his body always feels much better after each class. He says, “…as it gets easier, it gets much more enjoyable, and I think your body starts to get more out of it as you get better at the poses.”

When asked whether Bikram might have an effect on his baseball season, Nick said, “I definitely believe that Bikram yoga will have a positive effect on my game this year, and I am really looking forward to incorporating some of the breathing exercises and stretches into my pregame warm-up.” “…Bikram has helped with my mentality and spirituality, which I will be able to bring onto the playing field to help me slow the game down and relax on the mound, even in stressful situations.”

As I read through their answers, it was interesting to note that despite the fact that we’re currently in pretty different places in life, these athletes were deriving very similar benefits from their practice. I too have noticed that I’m less easily perturbed, my flexibility has reached an adulthood high and perhaps most surprisingly, I feel stronger – able to endure more activity with less fatigue or injury. Other benefits for me have included improvements in my breathing, digestion, and sleep.  My practice has become such an important part of my life that I’ve encouraged all my friends and family to try it. And now I’m encouraging you!

Matthew’s advice for anyone interested in trying Bikram:  “Take your time, do your best and breathe!”

For more information, visit www.bikramyogamiddletown.com. If you’d like to try a class, there will be free 8am and 4pm classes on Saturday, April 26.

 

 

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