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Reblogged from: Center for the Arts. (Go to the original post…)

John Spike '73

John Spike ’73

Favorite Course: Art History 101

Favorite Professors: Samuel Green & Heinrich Schwarz

Center for the Arts Story: Work began on the Center for the Arts while I was an undergrad. We never saw any part of it finished, but, in keeping with Wesleyan’s penchant for the exotic and barely practical, we felt proud that it was projected to have an entire building dedicated to just the gamelan orchestra. My professor and advisor in Art History was the beloved Sam Green, who painted in a traditional realism style but favored all things modern. Sam was instrumental in securing approval for Kevin Roche’s modernist-brutalist plan for the CFA. We all had some concern about what we had wrought as the massive monolithic temple blocks were lined up in the woods, and the joke on campus was, “It looks like something designed for the Mayans but rejected by them.”

Reblogged from: Special Collections & Archives at Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

 

women&wesleyan

If you were a female high school senior in 1969, you might have encountered this flyer. In 1970, Wesleyan once again admitted women as freshmen (Wesleyan was a coeducational institution from 1872 to 1912), and 2014 marks the 40th anniversary of their graduation. You can read much more about the return to coeducation in Suzy Taraba’s Historical Row column, “Women Return to Wes.”

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

 

Impact Network is a US-based non-profit organization that provides technology-based education solutions to children in rural Zambia. Impact Network is currently recruiting for the Impact Advocates program. This program provides students with the opportunity to gain hands-on experience running an advocacy campaign and developing and executing a fundraising project. The program is also a great way for college-level students to gain knowledge of the educational landscape in an international context.
IMPACT

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Grasso-Grant_r1In 2011, the Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame launched the Ella T. Grasso Leadership in Action Grant Program*, designed to honor the late Governor Ella Tambussi Grasso and her lifetime of public service and civic engagement. Believing that there is no better way to learn leadership skills than by developing and implementing a project plan and also that young people have the potential to find creative new ways to address community issues and problems, we strive to encourage and applaud their ingenuity. Our goal is to provide opportunities for college students to have real-world leadership-in-training experiences that foster real social change. Grant recipients will design and implement a community action project from start to finish. A faculty advisor/sponsor’s involvement is required, but it is the student who will develop the specifics of the project, outline goals and objectives for its outcomes, put together a plan for its implementation, create budgets and timelines, follow through with the project’s implementation, and report on successes, failures, and the true impact of the project on the community.

Grant Details

Grant(s) will be awarded each fall to young women enrolled at Connecticut colleges or universities to fund or partially fund community action or public service projects. The project must be completed within one year following the grant award. Deadline for submission of applications: July 15. Download Application Form (PDF)

Eligibility

Young women entering their junior or senior year at a Connecticut college or university are eligible to apply. Second-year students enrolled at two-year community colleges are also eligible. Students enrolled in a graduate program are also eligible to apply. Applicants intending to carry out a community action project in Connecticut during the grant period are eligible to apply for the grant. Applicants are eligible regardless of their primary area of study.

What kinds of projects are eligible?

Any community action, community service, or community outreach project is eligible for consideration.  Additionally, because of our 2014 theme, Shaping our World: Women in Design & Innovation, eligible projects can address a community problem or issue in an innovative way. Possible examples include educational programs; STEM-focused programs for girls; projects affiliated with a community service/non-profit organization; community service projects that help the homeless, the aging, women in crisis, or other underserved groups; and projects that help preserve the environment, advance technology or scientific study. Preference will be given to projects focusing on serving women or raising awareness of women’s issues and/or projects that pertain to this year’s STEM-related theme.

Interim and Follow-Up Reporting

Each grant recipient will be required to present her project and its final results to a special committee composed of CWHF staff, Board of Trustee members, and/or representatives from CWHF sponsoring organizations. In addition to final reporting, interim progress reports will be required with the schedule for these reports to be determined based on the timeline submitted for the project. Electronic versions of the project and results reports will be archived on the CWHF website to serve as a resource for future students and researchers. The project must be completed and its resultant reports submitted to CWHF no later than one year from the date of the grant award.

At the discretion of the CWHF, its Board, and sponsoring partners, applicants selected for final consideration may be asked for an in-person interview prior to grant awards. Awards will be presented at the CWHF’s Annual Induction Ceremony.  Attendance of grant recipients is expected at the event.

 

*Amber Smith ’14 won the Ella Grasso Grant in 2013. Read more here.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Grasso-Grant_r1In 2011, the Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame launched the Ella T. Grasso Leadership in Action Grant Program*, designed to honor the late Governor Ella Tambussi Grasso and her lifetime of public service and civic engagement. Believing that there is no better way to learn leadership skills than by developing and implementing a project plan and also that young people have the potential to find creative new ways to address community issues and problems, we strive to encourage and applaud their ingenuity. Our goal is to provide opportunities for college students to have real-world leadership-in-training experiences that foster real social change. Grant recipients will design and implement a community action project from start to finish. A faculty advisor/sponsor’s involvement is required, but it is the student who will develop the specifics of the project, outline goals and objectives for its outcomes, put together a plan for its implementation, create budgets and timelines, follow through with the project’s implementation, and report on successes, failures, and the true impact of the project on the community.

Grant Details

Grant(s) will be awarded each fall to young women enrolled at Connecticut colleges or universities to fund or partially fund community action or public service projects. The project must be completed within one year following the grant award. Deadline for submission of applications: July 15. Download Application Form (PDF)

Eligibility

Young women entering their junior or senior year at a Connecticut college or university are eligible to apply. Second-year students enrolled at two-year community colleges are also eligible. Students enrolled in a graduate program are also eligible to apply. Applicants intending to carry out a community action project in Connecticut during the grant period are eligible to apply for the grant. Applicants are eligible regardless of their primary area of study.

What kinds of projects are eligible?

Any community action, community service, or community outreach project is eligible for consideration.  Additionally, because of our 2014 theme, Shaping our World: Women in Design & Innovation, eligible projects can address a community problem or issue in an innovative way. Possible examples include educational programs; STEM-focused programs for girls; projects affiliated with a community service/non-profit organization; community service projects that help the homeless, the aging, women in crisis, or other underserved groups; and projects that help preserve the environment, advance technology or scientific study. Preference will be given to projects focusing on serving women or raising awareness of women’s issues and/or projects that pertain to this year’s STEM-related theme.

Interim and Follow-Up Reporting

Each grant recipient will be required to present her project and its final results to a special committee composed of CWHF staff, Board of Trustee members, and/or representatives from CWHF sponsoring organizations. In addition to final reporting, interim progress reports will be required with the schedule for these reports to be determined based on the timeline submitted for the project. Electronic versions of the project and results reports will be archived on the CWHF website to serve as a resource for future students and researchers. The project must be completed and its resultant reports submitted to CWHF no later than one year from the date of the grant award.

At the discretion of the CWHF, its Board, and sponsoring partners, applicants selected for final consideration may be asked for an in-person interview prior to grant awards. Awards will be presented at the CWHF’s Annual Induction Ceremony.  Attendance of grant recipients is expected at the event.

 

*Amber Smith ’14 won the Ella Grasso Grant in 2013. Read more here.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

blueprintThe Blueprint Schools Network is seeking passionate, qualified individuals to apply for our Fellowship Program operating in Denver, St. Louis, and Boston for the 2014/2015 school year! As a Blueprint Fellow, you’ll be taking part in a national movement to promote educational equity and improve life outcomes for students. Our Fellows are the foundation for the high-dosage daily tutoring program implemented across our partner schools to bolster academic achievement. Fellows provide daily differentiated academic lessons to five or six groups of just two to four students each.To learn more and to apply, please visit our website.

Position Summary

Blueprint Fellows play an integral role in heightening student achievement in schools across the country. On a daily basis, Fellows build individualized lessons and plan activities that help to fill in academic gaps students may have to strengthen academic performance inside the classroom. During the course of the year, Fellows are building strong relationships that help to increase each student’s self-confidence in and commitment to his/her education, helping to foster a positive future for each student.

While teachers have classrooms of 25 or 30 students, Fellows manage no more than 4 students at a time. This allows for the individualization of remedial and supplemental instruction. Fellows are charged with focusing on the individual needs of their students, helping to bolster and accelerate student achievement while helping to close any skill gaps that may exist.

Expectations

Fellows have a variety of responsibilities that allow them to be an integral piece of their student’s educational experience. Fellow responsibilities typically fall into one of the following categories: Instruction, Planning, Communication & Feedback, and Compliance.

To Apply:

Interested candidates are encouraged to visit our website, to learn more about the program and access the application.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

blueprintThe Blueprint Schools Network is seeking passionate, qualified individuals to apply for our Fellowship Program operating in Denver, St. Louis, and Boston for the 2014/2015 school year! As a Blueprint Fellow, you’ll be taking part in a national movement to promote educational equity and improve life outcomes for students. Our Fellows are the foundation for the high-dosage daily tutoring program implemented across our partner schools to bolster academic achievement. Fellows provide daily differentiated academic lessons to five or six groups of just two to four students each.To learn more and to apply, please visit our website.

Position Summary

Blueprint Fellows play an integral role in heightening student achievement in schools across the country. On a daily basis, Fellows build individualized lessons and plan activities that help to fill in academic gaps students may have to strengthen academic performance inside the classroom. During the course of the year, Fellows are building strong relationships that help to increase each student’s self-confidence in and commitment to his/her education, helping to foster a positive future for each student.

While teachers have classrooms of 25 or 30 students, Fellows manage no more than 4 students at a time. This allows for the individualization of remedial and supplemental instruction. Fellows are charged with focusing on the individual needs of their students, helping to bolster and accelerate student achievement while helping to close any skill gaps that may exist.

Expectations

Fellows have a variety of responsibilities that allow them to be an integral piece of their student’s educational experience. Fellow responsibilities typically fall into one of the following categories: Instruction, Planning, Communication & Feedback, and Compliance.

To Apply:

Interested candidates are encouraged to visit our website, to learn more about the program and access the application.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

wheeli-logo

Wheeli Gaming Day
Friday, April 18
Usdan Multi-Purpose Room
2-5p

This just in from Jean-Pierre Adechi ’10 — founder of Wheeli (http://www.wheeli.us/), Touche de Finesse (tdfcatering.com), Authorized Dealer Films (adfnyc.com), and the Alphabet City Dolly Film Festival (abcdfilmfestival.com) — and his student team at Wesleyan:

Wheeli, the college carpooling app started by Wes alum Jean-Pierre Adéchi ’10, is coming to campus during WesFest! Drop by for free video games, music, and food, and find out more about this incredible app!

For more information about this event, visit the Facebook event here.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

SVDePaulConsider participating in the Foodshare Walk Against Hunger with other Wesleyan folks and Middletown residents. This walk will directly benefit St. Vincent De Paul’s soup kitchen and the Amazing Grace Food Pantry in Middletown as they’ll be able to keep 80% of the profits earned. You can join the already established Wesleyan group, donate to a team member and ask your friends to join or sponsor you. Sherri Condon is the team captain for Wesleyan walkers. If you’re interested in participating, please contact her at scondon@wesleyan.edu and she’ll help you get registered and order you a team t-shirt!

Info on the Foodshare walk (do not confuse with the CT Food Bank Walks happening the same day, also a great walk but this one directly benefits Middletown residents):

http://site.foodshare.org/site/TR/Walk/General?team_id=11350&pg=team&fr_id=1280

http://site.foodshare.org/site/DocServer/FS_2014_WalkBroch_print.pdf?docID=1481

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

charlestoncollege

Intern, Office of Sustainability at the College of Charleston: Created in the fall of 2011, the Office of Sustainability at the College of Charleston is comprised of undergraduate and graduate interns working under the direction of full time office staff. This position requires working with campus associates as well as other community members to further building and strengthening our relationship with the community of Charleston. (Deadline: Friday, April 18)

 

queenscountyParalegal and Cold Case Analyst, Queens County District Attorney’s Office: The Queens County District Attorney’s Office welcomes applications from recent college graduates. Candidates should have an interest in criminal justice and possess strong inter-personal, organizational, and writing skills. Candidates for the Cold Case Analyst position would benefit from an interest in and some familiarity with forensic DNA.

 

HatuaIntern, Hatua Likoni: Hatua Likoni is a community NGO working to promote education and employment among youth in Likoni, Kenya. Through scholarships, mentoring, and career guidance, Hatua helps top students gain the skills, credentials, and networks they need to contribute to and benefit from Kenya’s growing economy. Interns interested in providing mentoring and career guidance for youth, library services, teaching writing or computer skills, communications, M&E, or project management can volunteer directly with Hatua Likoni. Those interested in teaching primary school, assisting at an orphanage, doing public health outreach, or coaching football can work with one of a number of organizations doing good work on behalf of children and youth in Likoni.  More information (Deadline: Thursday, May 1)

 

BrighterDawnsFellow, Brighter DawnsBrighter Dawns is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization committed to resolving health issues in slum communities in South Asia. Our current goal is to improve health and quality of life for residents of Ward 12, an urban slum in Khalishpur, Bangladesh. Our current project addresses clean water access and lack of sanitation by repairing and maintaining tube wells and sanitary latrines, as well as holding health seminars to teach women and schoolchildren the importance of basic sanitary practices such as hand-washing. (Deadline: Tuesday, May 20)

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