Feed on
Posts
Comments

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

Interested in the Psychology Major?

Learn more about the Cultural Immersion Experiences – Abroad and Domestic

Feb. 3rd (Tues.), 12:00 -1:00 pm, Judd 116

Prospective Majors bring your questions and concerns.   

Office of International Studies – Gail Winter, Assistant Director

Office of Community Partnerships – Catherine Lechowicz, Director

Psychology Department – Andrea Patalano, Chair

Pizza will be provided!

Helpful info on the major: http://www.wesleyan.edu/psyc/about/major_guides.html.

 

 

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

The Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship presents

FUNDRAISING BOOTCAMP: GRANTWRITING 101

A dinner, talk, and workshop with Sonya Behnke ’03,
Director of Corporate and Foundation Relations at Mass General Hospital,
(previously Manager of Institutional Giving for the Greater Boston Food Bank)

Tuesday, February 17
6-7:30 p.m.
Allbritton 311 

Dinner will be provided for those who register by February 13. 

Have you ever been part of an organization that needs funding? Do you think you’ll work for a non-profit or NGO at some point in your career? Identifying donors and foundations, building relationships with prospects, writing compelling grant applications, and demonstrating program outcomes are key skills for anyone working to have social impact. During this 2-hour bootcamp, participants will hear about careers in fundraising, learn some concrete tools for raising money, and get hands-on grantwriting practice.

 

Sonya BehnkeSonya Behnke ’03, Director of Corporate and Foundation Relations at Mass General Hospital
Sonya Behnke has nearly a decade of experience fundraising for diverse nonprofits. Through full-time positions and as a volunteer and consultant, Sonya has effectively built relationships with foundations and corporate partners of all sizes and scope, closing gifts ranging from small seed funding grants for nonprofit start-ups to transformative, multi-million grants to established institutions.

Sonya was first “hooked” on the power and promise of working in the nonprofit sector while completing her Master of Public Policy at Georgetown University.  Selected as the Waldemar A. Nielsen Philanthropy Fellow in her second year of study, Sonya worked as a grantwriting intern for the innovative nonprofit, DC Central Kitchen, and published work in The Chronicle of Philanthropy and Nonprofit Quarterly. Following graduation, Sonya became a grant writer for Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Washington, supporting the organization’s diverse social and health services for the immigrant and refugee populations of Washington, DC and surrounding counties. After relocating to Boston, Sonya was hired as the manager of institutional giving at The Greater Boston Food Bank. In just over two years, Sonya increased annual foundation revenue by over 70%, working in close concert with a portfolio of roughly 60 foundation and corporate partners. Today, Sonya serves as director of corporate and foundation relations for Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), raising over $8 million annually for the hospital’s Cancer Center as well as the Red Sox Foundation and MGH Home Base Program for veterans and military families.

Sonya graduated from Wesleyan University as an English and American Studies major and was a member of the Women’s Field Hockey and Lacrosse teams.

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

Dr. Martin Luther King Commemoration  —   “We shall overcome:  How far have we come?”

All members of the Wesleyan and greater Middletown community are invited to a panel presentation and discussion to explore various perspectives about the recent events in Ferguson, Missouri, and New York City to commemorate the life, civil rights and social justice legacy that Dr. King has left. The commemoration will be held in Wesleyan’s Memorial Chapel on Friday, January 30, at 3:15 pm. This is a ticketed, free event. Tickets to the event can be secured at the University Box Office.

The event will include music and an audio clip of Dr. King’s baccalaureate address to the Wesleyan community 51 years ago, followed by the panel presentation and discussion.

The panel discussion will be moderated by Antonio Farias, Vice President for Equity & Inclusion/Title IX Officer, and will include the following panelists:

Riché J. Daniel Barnes, Assistant Professor of Afro-American Studies, Smith College

Dreisen Heath ’15, African American Studies and FGSS major, Wesleyan University

Kiese Laymon, Associate Professor of English, Vassar College

Chief Joseph Dooley, President of the CT Police Chiefs Association

The program will be followed by a brief dessert reception. Later in the evening there will be a series of discussions to be held in various locations on campus and a student-coordinated open-mic at 8:00 pm in the West College Cafe.  Details will follow regarding the evening events.

Reblogged from: ITS System Announcements. (Go to the original post…)

We learned that a configuration error resulted in faculty and staff who use Windows PC’s may have had their default printer set to a printer queue in the WSA office.  The configuration has been changed, however please check your printers before sending any print job and verify your default printer.  You can change the default printer back and the next time you restart the other printer will be gone. 

To completely remove that printer you have two choices:

1. restart your computer
2. If you do not want to restart, you may do the following:

Go to Start, Run
type in cmd
A black window will open with a command prompt that looks like this:  c:users(yourusername)>
type in that window gpupdate /force
Your computer will briefly say Updating policy….
Then it will say Computer Policy update has completed successfully.
User Policy update has completed successfully.  

Any jobs that were printed to that printer in error have been removed and placed into the shredding bin by an ITS staff person.

This is a configuration mistake with potentially serious consequences. We deeply apologize for the error and are taking steps to ensure such mistakes do not occur again.

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

Interested in becoming an RA for the 2015-16 academic year?    Applications are available now in your student portfolio under the Residential Life box.  Applications are due Friday, February 6, 2015 at 12 Noon, EST.

All applicants are required to attend one of the following information Sessions:

Thursday, January 29, 2015 Information session, 7:00-8:00 p.m., Clark Lounge
Monday, February 2, 2015 Information session, 12:00-1:00 p.m., Usdan 108
Wednesday, February 4, 2015 Information session, 7:00-8:00 p.m., Usdan 110

For more information, please visit www.wesleyan.edu/reslife

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Ismet Jooma ’14

[Rehan Mehta '14]Rehan Mehta ’14 cooks at the Momofuku Milk Bar in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. While he was known on campus as an active member of the MINDS foundation and Shakti, Wesleyan’s South Asian cultural association, his inner circles and cult following at Wes can attest to his expertise and not-so-secret passion for the culinary arts. Wesconnect interviewed Rehan about his first job out of college:

What is your role in the Momofuku group, and why did you choose to join them?

I currently work as a pastry cook in the dessert/bakery wing of the Momofuku restaurant group, known as Momofuku Milk Bar. Over the last seven months I have gone from making huge batches of cookie dough, to assembling beautiful layered cakes and pies, and I have most recently moved to the bread station where we make savory buns which are stuffed with things like egg and cheese, pastrami or roast pork.

Choosing Momofuku was an easy decision for me as I have been a huge fan of the Momofuku restaurants and their chef/owner David Chang for the last few years. What truly struck me on my first visit was the super casual atmosphere of the restaurant paired with highly technical almost fine-dining cuisine. It helped me realize that incredible, modern food didn’t have to be limited to fancy and expensive restaurants.

What was your academic focus at Wesleyan? How did a liberal arts education influence your decision to become a chef?

[Rehan Mehta '14]

I was a psychology major at Wesleyan. People often ask me how I went from studying psychology to becoming a cook, as if they have no connection. The cognitive techniques I was introduced to in my psychology courses are constantly helping me to overcome psychological barriers. The best example I can think of is ‘Positive Psychology’, a course I took in my final semester at Wesleyan. While I was in the course I remember not finding it very interesting, but now I often find myself reflecting on the topics we discussed, like optimism, signature strengths, and resilience, just to name a few.

More importantly, I have found that the content I studied in my courses at Wesleyan was secondary to the core skills I developed as a liberal arts student. For example, I never really enjoyed writing papers at Wesleyan, and initially my papers were horrific. After getting feedback from multiple professors and regularly visiting the writing mentors, I came up with a strategy that worked best for me. It might sound ridiculous, but soon after joining Momofuku I found myself utilizing the same strategy with my prep list (the list of things I am told to make at the beginning of every work day). I take a good amount of time every morning to make a list breaking down each item into its essential components and figuring out the best way to plan my day so that I can complete my prep list efficiently and on time.

What are some common misconceptions, challenges, and rewarding experiences you have had in the culinary industry?

I think as a result of all the food television the culinary industry, and specifically becoming a chef, has kind of become a “cool” thing to do. However, after just seven months in a professional kitchen I can say that that is far from the truth. Being a cook is an extremely difficult job. Most people don’t realize how physically demanding it is. Not only do you spend 10+ hours a day on your feet, but there is also a lot of very heavy lifting and constant cleaning of the kitchen. My first few weeks in the Milk Bar kitchen I would come home from work and collapse into bed cause my entire body would be sore. Besides the physical demands, cooks work most weekends, which makes it difficult to have a normal social life. Most importantly, there is a lot of pressure to be extremely mindful while cooking since people are trusting you to produce a safe product that won’t make them sick or harm them in any way. Thus, just as you would cook for your family, safety and hygiene are most important.

Having said that, there is no greater feeling that completing a long prep list on time and without any mistakes. Food is my greatest passion and whether or not I am a cook for very long; I am sure I will always work in some area of the culinary industry.

Is there anything in particular which you would strongly urge your peers to take part in at Wesleyan?

The best advice I can give is to take a long nap every day. I’m talking like two or three hours after class, just like I did at Wesleyan, cause naps are awesome and it’s really hard to do that after graduating!

Images: c/o Rehan Mehta

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20150128-rehan-mehta

#THISISWHY

Related links

[LinkedIn] connect with Rehan Mehta on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Aditi Kini ’13

[John Wesley North '41]Fierce abolitionist, friend of Abraham Lincoln, and founder of two cities, John Wesley North, Class of 1841 was recently featured by the StarTribune, on the two hundredth anniversary of his birth. He not only founded the town of Northfield, Minnesota (and later, Riverside, California) but had “pivotal roles” in founding the University of Minnesota and the state’s Republican Party.

He was a delegate at the Chicago Republican Convention which nominated Abraham Lincoln for the presidency of the U.S., and was also part of the committee that notified Lincoln of his nomination. Years later, John Wesley North was appointed the official surveyor of the new Territory of Nevada by President Lincoln.

An exemplar of frontier humanism, North studied law at Wesleyan and moved West, several times, along the way founding cities, clashing with Mark Twain, and lending a hand in the abolition movement.

He befriended Abraham Lincoln after joining the 1860 delegation that traveled by train from Chicago to Springfield, Ill., to inform “the tall, grave, kindly man” that he’d been tapped as the Republicans’ presidential nominee.

But John Wesley North, born 200 years ago this Jan. 4, is best known for the town on the Cannon River named after him: Northfield. In a letter written on his 40th birthday in 1855 — to a father-in-law who constantly bailed him out of financial trouble — North wrote: “The whole valley of this river is beautiful and very fertile … The crabapple and wild plum grow there in great abundance, and furnish fruit to the settlers.”

Some historians say there is no direct proof that Northfield was named after John North — a guy who had no intentions of creating the town in the first place. In an 1880 letter, written when he was 65, North admitted: “I did not at first contemplate starting a town, much less a city: I only thought of a mill. There was no road running through the place.”

Read more…

Image: c/o Northfield Historical Society

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20150127-john-wesley-north

Related links

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Ismet Jooma ’14

[Rehan Mehta '14]Rehan Mehta ’14 cooks at the Momofuku Milk Bar in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. While he was known on campus as an active member of the MINDS foundation and Shakti, Wesleyan’s South Asian cultural association, his inner circles and cult following at Wes can attest to his expertise and not-so-secret passion for the culinary arts. Wesconnect interviewed Rehan about his first job out of college:

What is your role in the Momofuku group, and why did you choose to join them?

I currently work as a pastry cook in the dessert/bakery wing of the Momofuku restaurant group, known as Momofuku Milk Bar. Over the last seven months I have gone from making huge batches of cookie dough, to assembling beautiful layered cakes and pies, and I have most recently moved to the bread station where we make savory buns which are stuffed with things like egg and cheese, pastrami or roast pork.

Choosing Momofuku was an easy decision for me as I have been a huge fan of the Momofuku restaurants and their chef/owner David Chang for the last few years. What truly struck me on my first visit was the super casual atmosphere of the restaurant paired with highly technical almost fine-dining cuisine. It helped me realize that incredible, modern food didn’t have to be limited to fancy and expensive restaurants.

What was your academic focus at Wesleyan? How did a liberal arts education influence your decision to become a chef?

[Rehan Mehta '14]

I was a psychology major at Wesleyan. People often ask me how I went from studying psychology to becoming a cook, as if they have no connection. The cognitive techniques I was introduced to in my psychology courses are constantly helping me to overcome psychological barriers. The best example I can think of is ‘Positive Psychology’, a course I took in my final semester at Wesleyan. While I was in the course I remember not finding it very interesting, but now I often find myself reflecting on the topics we discussed, like optimism, signature strengths, and resilience, just to name a few.

More importantly, I have found that the content I studied in my courses at Wesleyan was secondary to the core skills I developed as a liberal arts student. For example, I never really enjoyed writing papers at Wesleyan, and initially my papers were horrific. After getting feedback from multiple professors and regularly visiting the writing mentors, I came up with a strategy that worked best for me. It might sound ridiculous, but soon after joining Momofuku I found myself utilizing the same strategy with my prep list (the list of things I am told to make at the beginning of every work day). I take a good amount of time every morning to make a list breaking down each item into its essential components and figuring out the best way to plan my day so that I can complete my prep list efficiently and on time.

What are some common misconceptions, challenges, and rewarding experiences you have had in the culinary industry?

I think as a result of all the food television the culinary industry, and specifically becoming a chef, has kind of become a “cool” thing to do. However, after just seven months in a professional kitchen I can say that that is far from the truth. Being a cook is an extremely difficult job. Most people don’t realize how physically demanding it is. Not only do you spend 10+ hours a day on your feet, but there is also a lot of very heavy lifting and constant cleaning of the kitchen. My first few weeks in the Milk Bar kitchen I would come home from work and collapse into bed cause my entire body would be sore. Besides the physical demands, cooks work most weekends, which makes it difficult to have a normal social life. Most importantly, there is a lot of pressure to be extremely mindful while cooking since people are trusting you to produce a safe product that won’t make them sick or harm them in any way. Thus, just as you would cook for your family, safety and hygiene are most important.

Having said that, there is no greater feeling that completing a long prep list on time and without any mistakes. Food is my greatest passion and whether or not I am a cook for very long; I am sure I will always work in some area of the culinary industry.

Is there anything in particular which you would strongly urge your peers to take part in at Wesleyan?

The best advice I can give is to take a long nap every day. I’m talking like two or three hours after class, just like I did at Wesleyan, cause naps are awesome and it’s really hard to do that after graduating!

Images: c/o Rehan Mehta

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20150128-rehan-mehta

#THISISWHY

Related links

[LinkedIn] connect with Rehan Mehta on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Aditi Kini ’13

[John Wesley North '41]Fierce abolitionist, friend of Abraham Lincoln, and founder of two cities, John Wesley North, Class of 1841 was recently featured by the StarTribune, on the two hundredth anniversary of his birth. He not only founded the town of Northfield, Minnesota (and later, Riverside, California) but had “pivotal roles” in founding the University of Minnesota and the state’s Republican Party.

He was a delegate at the Chicago Republican Convention which nominated Abraham Lincoln for the presidency of the U.S., and was also part of the committee that notified Lincoln of his nomination. Years later, John Wesley North was appointed the official surveyor of the new Territory of Nevada by President Lincoln.

An exemplar of frontier humanism, North studied law at Wesleyan and moved West, several times, along the way founding cities, clashing with Mark Twain, and lending a hand in the abolition movement.

He befriended Abraham Lincoln after joining the 1860 delegation that traveled by train from Chicago to Springfield, Ill., to inform “the tall, grave, kindly man” that he’d been tapped as the Republicans’ presidential nominee.

But John Wesley North, born 200 years ago this Jan. 4, is best known for the town on the Cannon River named after him: Northfield. In a letter written on his 40th birthday in 1855 — to a father-in-law who constantly bailed him out of financial trouble — North wrote: “The whole valley of this river is beautiful and very fertile … The crabapple and wild plum grow there in great abundance, and furnish fruit to the settlers.”

Some historians say there is no direct proof that Northfield was named after John North — a guy who had no intentions of creating the town in the first place. In an 1880 letter, written when he was 65, North admitted: “I did not at first contemplate starting a town, much less a city: I only thought of a mill. There was no road running through the place.”

Read more…

Image: c/o Northfield Historical Society

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20150127-john-wesley-north

Related links

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Center for the Arts. (Go to the original post…)

CFA Arts Administration Intern Chloe Jones ’15 talks with Assistant Professor of Art Sasha Rudensky about the “Picture/Thing” exhibition, which opens in the Main Gallery of Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery on Thursday, January 29, 2015. Admission to the gallery is free.

Assistant Professor of Art Sasha Rudensky and Professor of Art Jeffrey Schiff have teamed up to bring us Picture/Thing, an exhibition in the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery that explores the relationship between photography and sculpture through the work of ten groundbreaking artists: Kendall Baker, Isidro Blasco, Rachel Harrison ’89, Leslie Hewitt, Jon Kessler, Anouk Kruithof, Marlo Pascual, Mariah Robertson, Erin Shirreff, and Letha Wilson.

These ten artists create hybrid objects that challenge and expand traditional definitions of photography and sculpture. The objects in the exhibition take myriad forms, as each artist has a unique approach to material, technology, and presentation.

Upon entering the gallery, one is greeted by the work of Erin Shirreff. “Hers are digital prints that have been placed in somewhat traditional frames,” says co-curator Ms. Rudensky. “But when you look closer you discover this whole other reality. For one thing the paper is not flat. It’s three dimensional, and what she’s capturing are sculptures, or forms that are very reminiscent of mid-century sculpture, so she’s playing with this lateral movement back and forth between photography and sculpture.”

facade_blog

Anouk Kruithof, “Façade,” 2014, inkjet prints, plexiglass, polystyrene, cellophane foil, bricks, 55.5 x 43.3 x 39.4 inches, courtesy of the artist and Boetzelaer | Nispen.

Turning around one sees a free-standing “picture/thing” by Anouk Kruithof. Its styrofoam blocks and iridescent glass glisten. “It’s a very mysterious piece,” says Ms. Rudensky. “In part because as you walk around it, the view and the content change dramatically. Because of the play of light that happens with the reflectedness of the materials she’s using, there’s this revelatory experience that continues as you circumnavigate the piece.”

Venturing further into the gallery, one encounters the work of Mariah Robertson. “She’s someone who works with traditional photographic processes,” says Ms. Rudensky. “She makes darkroom prints in a time when very few people are making darkroom prints, but then does these wild things with them by making 164 foot photographs that are suspended in space.”

Picture/Thing transforms the gallery into a world of rare objects. Each artist’s work is stunningly different from the next.

While most of the artists hail from Brooklyn and Harlem, their work speaks to a far-reaching trend in contemporary art.

“The idea for the exhibition came together rather quickly, in part because the phenomenon is very much there and present,” says Ms. Rudensky. “Artists are looking for new ways of dealing with traditional media.”

Picture/Thing will be on display in the Main Gallery of the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery through Sunday, March 1, 2015.

Interested to hear Ms. Rudensky speak in more detail about the exhibition? She and co-curator Jeffrey Schiff will give a talk at 5:30pm this Thursday, January 29 as part of the exhibition’s opening reception.

Older Posts »

Log in