Feed on
Posts
Comments

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Wesleyan’s Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship is pleased to announce the winners of the 2015 PCSE Seed Grant Challenge. These student-led social ventures will each receive $5,000 in unrestricted funds as well as training, advising, mentoring, incubator workspace, and other resources from the Patricelli Center.

Recipients were selected from a strong pool of finalists who submitted written business plans and pitched to a panel of expert judges comprised of alumni, students, faculty, and staff. Applicants were assessed on their project design, leadership qualities, and potential for social impact.

The 2015 Seed Grant recipients are:

assk logoAssk (Rachel Verner ’15)
Assk is a company that strives to normalize sexual consent through apparel and education, thereby preventing sexual violence. The apparel may serve as a broad reminder on a t-shirt, as a sign of solidarity for survivors, and as an immediate, intimate reminder in the bedroom. By educating people on how to speak up and prevent sexual violence, and by encouraging people to recognize sexual violence as their own issue, Assk will instil and increase social responsibility, and will breakdown stereotypes surrounding survivors of sexual violence.
View Assk’s pitch deck

potlux logoPotlux (Brent Packer ’15, Aaron Rosen ’15, Jared Geilich ’15, Gerard Liu ’15, Keren Reichler ’16, Cassia Patel ’16, Ellen Paik ’16, and Gabe Frankel ’15)
Potlux is on track to be the first online community where collegiate sustainability initiatives are effectively aggregated and shared. The potential for this platform is huge: facilitating best practice movements across the college network, inspiring new ideas, building intercollegiate collaboration, and catalyzing project funding.
View Potlux’s pitch deck

The Wesleyan Doula Project logoThe Wesleyan Doula Project (Alexandra Stovicek ’17, Hannah Sokoloff-Rubin ’16, and Julia Vermeulen ’15)
The Wesleyan Doula Project is the only university-based doula project in the country.  As doulas, we provide emotional, physical, and informational support to women choosing to terminate their pregnancies at Connecticut Planned Parenthood clinics.  A student-run, volunteer collective, we are part of a greater movement to address growing inequalities in reproductive health care by advocating for reproductive choice at Wesleyan and within the broader community.
View the Wesleyan Doula Project’s pitch deck

These winners exemplify the spirit of innovation and impact shared by so many members if the Wesleyan community. Assk, Potlux, and The Wesleyan Doula Project follow in a long line of successful Wesleyan-connected social ventures — from SHOFCO to RefugePoint, Sustainable South Bronx to Musician Corps, and so many more. They have well-designed business plans, address a clear need, and are led by star entrepreneurs.

Makaela Kingsley ’98, Director of the Patricelli Center, said “This was an especially tough year for selecting grantees. The culture of entrepreneurship at Wesleyan is exploding, and we have so many talented students who are passionate about tackling the world’s pressing problems. It is a privilege for me to support Assk, Potlux, The Wesleyan Doula Project, and all of the student entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs connected with the Patricelli Center.”

For more information about the PCSE Seed Grant Competition and other Patricelli Center programs, visit http://www.wesleyan.edu/patricelli.

All Aboard! The Romance of Trains is a Wesleyan Institute for Lifelong Learning full-day program taking place on Saturday, May 16, 2015 entirely at the facilities of the Valley Railroad Company in Essex, CT. The day will include classroom discussions, an examination of railroad artifacts found along the line, a tour of the Valley Railroad shops and equipment, and a demonstration of the techniques of steam locomotive operation. Participants will then take a narrated excursion on the Essex Steam Train and Riverboat in the afternoon. Box lunch included. The Institute was chartered by Wesleyan University in 2009 to provide educational opportunities to members of the community outside of formal degree-granting programs. For more information or to register, please visit www.wesleyan.edu/will or call (860) 685-2273. Registration must be received by Friday, May 8th.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

2014-01-26 15.40.55

Alexandra with her NEAT mentee

Service-Learning courses can involve a wide range of activities that extend well beyond traditional volunteer service. For The Health of Communities with Professor Peggy Carey Best, this means conducting research with real-world applications, right here in Middletown. In addition to reading and discussing literature on public health, medicine, and ethics, students serve as research assistants at the nearby Community Health Center, where they grapple with once-theoretical issues related to health inequity and community-based research.

To learn more about this experience, I spoke with Alexandra Irace ’15, who took The Health of Communities last semester and will be working on her CHC project through April. She is a double in Neuroscience & Behavior and Italian Studies, as well as a mentor for Wesleyan’s NEAT Mentoring Program, a steering committee member for Wesleyan Women in Science, a sister of Rho Epsilon Pi, and the co-creator and editor of Wesleyan’s food blog, WesStuffed.

Hi Alex! Can you tell me about your research at the CHC?
I am working with Anna Michalowski (a fellow senior) on a research project that aims to increase enrollment in trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) for the treatment of pediatric post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at the CHC. Given the statistics of children who have been exposed to potentially traumatic events, our team believes that there is significant under-enrollment in TF-CBT, which means that children who are experiencing or are in the process of developing PTSD are not being identified. To attempt to increase enrollment, we are hoping to implement a new pediatric trauma screen that will be used during children’s medical and behavioral health appointments at the CHC. Children who show signs of trauma exposure through this screen will be identified as candidates for TF-CBT.

Some things that Anna and I have been working on include editing the IRB proposal that needs to be reviewed in order to allow the pediatric trauma screen to be used during healthcare appointments, searching for literature with updated statistics and information about the use of TF-CBT in treating PTSD, and making an annotated bibliography to summarize our findings (which will be incorporated into the IRB proposal).

In the spring semester, we hope to have the IRB proposal passed so that we can begin collecting data on the effectiveness of the pediatric trauma screen.

Is there a practical application for your research? What will the CHC do with the findings of your project?
If successful, this pediatric trauma screen may serve as a long-term addition to medical and behavioral care appointments for children at the CHC.

Why did you sign up for this course?
I signed up for this course after talking with a student who had taken the course last year and absolutely loved it. She said that it really inspired her to get more involved in the field of public health and that working on her research project was a great practical application of the concepts she was learning in class. Having never taken a service-learning course at Wesleyan before, I wasn’t completely sure what the commitment would be outside of the classroom, but I knew that the course would allow me to engage in meaningful research in the Middletown community, which I was really excited about. I also knew that whatever project I was assigned to would fall right in line with my interests in the healthcare profession. 

How has the service-learning component enhanced your experience of the course and affected your understanding of the subject matter?
The service-learning component of the course allows the students to realize the importance of the topics and issues we discuss in class. Because Peggy conducts the class in a seminar fashion, the class revolves around students sharing their opinions and personal insights on the reading material. At the beginning of the semester, I was able to understand the topics we would discuss, but did not always have a realistic interpretation of their significance based on personal knowledge. However, by the end of the semester I felt like my particular research project at the CHC allowed me to really appreciate the importance of mental health, informed consent, and research protocols, for example, which were all things that we covered in our class discussions. I also have a whole new understanding of the barriers to access to healthcare for certain populations, and why this leads to health inequality along a social gradient. As someone who hopes to enter the medical profession, I feel like I am much more prepared to make a difference in this field after taking this course and beginning to work at the CHC.

What were the unexpected rewards and challenges of the course?
One challenge I faced was scheduling time to complete all the reading assignments that Peggy assigns. Because we discuss every article fairly in depth, you can’t get away with not doing all the reading. Student participation is a huge component of the course – it’s probably just as important as the writing assignments.

One thing that I am really happy about is that my research project carries over into the spring semester. At first, I remember feeling a little bit hesitant about committing myself to work at the CHC for a whole year, but you really can’t get a lot done on your project in just one semester. I’m really happy that we will be able to continue to make meaningful progress on our project.

I also feel really lucky to be able to work with Dr. Tim Kearney and Kim Citron at the CHC, who are experienced professionals in the field of psychology and show an incredible amount of passion for the work that they are doing.

Has this course influenced your career interests?
I think that I would like to get more experience learning about the field of public health, perhaps by working for an organization like the Community HealthCorps before I enter medical school. The course has showed me how important it is to combat health disparities by serving underprivileged populations, and this is something that I hope to achieve as a physician.

What other activities or groups are you involved with at Wesleyan?
I’m a mentor for Wesleyan’s NEAT Mentoring Program, a steering committee member for Wesleyan Women in Science, a sister of Rho Epsilon Pi, and the co-creator and editor of Wesleyan’s food blog, WesStuffed.

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Storytelling Project. (Go to the original post…)

[Kate and Mike Gilles ’04] A clip from our interview with Kate Gilles ’04 and Matt Gilles ’04.

[Kate and Mike as undergraduates]“There’s this really good-looking guy talking very passionately and knowledgeably about something I care a whole lot about.”

Kate and Mike were married in 2008, and currently live in Washington, D.C., with their two-year-old son, Sebastian, and two dogs. Kate works as a Senior Policy Analyst for the Population Reference Bureau, where she focuses on youth, gender, and sexual and reproductive health policy issues. She is also a coordinator for the D.C. Doulas for Choice Collective. Mike works as an Attorney-Adviser for the U.S. Department of State, where he current serves in the office of economic and business affairs. He also teaches a course in International Business Transactions at American University’s Washington College of Law.

[A recent picture of the Gilles family]

Their story was featured as part of Wes-Side Story, a Wesleyan Valentine’s Day Special in 2015.

The Wesleyan Storytelling Project is produced by senior producer Mia Lobel ’97 and student producer Tess Altman ’17.

Listen to the clip

Listen on your tablet or mobile device

More stories

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/storytelling-kate-and-mike-gilles-04

Music: “Sleep Inside” by The Last Minutes—Ryan Rodger ’11, Ben Block ’11, Katherine McDonald ’11 and Bella Loggins ’10, and “Your Song” by Bella Loggins

#THISISWHY

Record a comment

Like an episode or clip? Have an idea for a story? Record a comment by calling (860) 685-3100.*

You can also write to wesconnect@wesleyan.edu with comments and suggestions, or leave a comment below.

* By leaving a message you are granting Wesleyan permission to use your recording on Wesleyan.edu, SoundCloud.com and social media sites as part of our promotion of the podcast. We may add your recorded message to an upcoming episode or clip.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Bryan Stascavage ’18

[Ron Young '65]Ron Young ’65 was preparing to write his senior thesis about the role of forgiveness in nonviolent protesting for his degree in College of Social Studies when “Bloody Sunday” occurred in Selma, Alabama on Mar. 7, 1965. “Bloody Sunday” was an attack by police on civil rights demonstrators who were advocating for Black American voter registration, which motivated Young and four other Wesleyan students to travel down to Selma and participate in the protests. Only stopping for food and gas, the group arrived in Selma the evening of Mar. 8 to participate in a march the next day that was organized by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Young recounts the experience on the Fellowship of Reconciliation blog. The organization is dedicated to resolving human conflict through peaceful means and is having a Selma Jubilee to commemorate the 50th anniversary of “The Bloody Sunday March” from Mar. 5 to Monday, Mar. 9. Ethan Vesely-Flad ’89 is the director of national organizing for the fellowship.

Young attended rallies at local churches – singing songs, learning about the issues, and discussing strategies that lead to the overall decision to commit to nonviolent protesting. Young spoke directly with Dr. King, who asked Young to accompany black staff to nearby towns that were also fighting for the right for Black Americans to vote. Young postulated that Dr. King was making sure that if Young and his staff were to be attacked by the police, the media would pay more attention since Young is white.

Young describes his tense encounter with a local police officer:

On another night in Selma, as on most nights, I walked alone from a mass meeting at Brown’s Chapel back to the house where I was staying with a black family. It was about nine o’clock and not having had dinner, I paused momentarily outside a café, near where a week earlier James Reeb, a Unitarian Minister, had been savagely beaten by a mob of angry whites. Reeb died two days later in a Birmingham hospital. Seeing the closed sign on the door, I turned to walk on. As I did, a black sedan pulled up next to me at the curb. The white driver leaned toward me, rolled the window down on the passenger side, and called out, “Hey boy, are you one of them civil rights workers?” I pretended not to hear him and walked on.

Pulling alongside me again, the man added, “I’m a policeman. I don’t want to hurt you. I just want to talk with you.” I walked on a bit faster, still trying to ignore him. He drove his car up onto the sidewalk ahead of me, reached over and opened the passenger side door of his car right in front of me. This time, in a more pleading voice, he said, “You don’t need to be afraid, really, I just want to talk.” I stood at the car door trembling and wanting to get away. But after he showed me his police badge, I was not sure what to do. “By the way,” he said, “my name is Charlie.”

Read more…

Image: c/o Ron Young

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20150303-ron-young

Related links

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Caroline MacNeille ’16

[Catie Lazarus '99]Writer, comedian and host of Employee of the Month Catie Lazarus ’99 recently sat down with Jon Stewart to discuss his departure from The Daily Show, his preferred successors and a potential future in blogging.

Catie earned her BA and MA in Psychology from Wesleyan. She began performing standup in New York and was quickly named ‘Best Comedy Writer’ by Emerging Comics of New York. Catie has also been named ‘Funniest Reporter’ by Laugh Factory and a ‘Top 100 New Yorker’ by The New York Resident. In addition to hosting and standup, Catie writes a weekly column for Out Magazine. She has written for Slate, The New York Times Magazine, The Daily Beast and Funny or Die. Catie is involved with The Moth and Upright Citizens Brigade Theater. The New Yorker covered the Employee of the Month live show with Jon Stewart:

For several years, the comedian Catie Lazarus has hosted a live talk show, “Employee of the Month,” with an accompanying weekly podcast, in which she interviews notable people—Jill Abramson, Rachel Maddow, Barney Frank, and Wallace Shawn among them—about their jobs. Her tone with guests is both playful and serious: Lazarus is a veteran of U.C.B., standup, and comedy writing, and she was once in a doctoral program in clinical psychology. “On my show, people say things that they don’t normally say,” she told me recently. Lewis Black teared up; the playwright Adam Rapp referred to the Times critic Charles Isherwood as an “asshole”; Gloria Steinem talked about the “f” word and did an elegant little dance.

On Thursday night, at Joe’s Pub, Lazarus interviewed Jon Stewart, a week after he announced that he was leaving “The Daily Show.”

Lazarus, who once played a woman in a mikvah in a “Daily Show” sketch about a prequel to “Hot Tub Time Machine,” took a broad approach to presenting Stewart’s career. “You may remember him from ‘Playing by Heart’ or ‘Death to Smoochy,’ ” she said. The band played “Born in the U.S.A.”—Stewart is from New Jersey—and he came onstage in a faded leather jacket and a gray hoodie the approximate color of his hair. He looked weathered but vital, up for a little after-work jam session. Joe’s Pub went wild with cheering.

Read more…

Here is Catie’s interview with Jon Stewart:

Image: c/o Employee of the Month

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20150303-catie-lazarus

Related links

[Twitter] follow @CatieLazarus on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Catie Lazarus on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Caroline MacNeille ’16

[Catie Lazarus '99]Writer, comedian and host of Employee of the Month Catie Lazarus ’99 recently sat down with Jon Stewart to discuss his departure from The Daily Show, his preferred successors and a potential future in blogging.

Catie earned her BA and MA in Psychology from Wesleyan. She began performing standup in New York and was quickly named ‘Best Comedy Writer’ by Emerging Comics of New York. Catie has also been named ‘Funniest Reporter’ by Laugh Factory and a ‘Top 100 New Yorker’ by The New York Resident. In addition to hosting and standup, Catie writes a weekly column for Out Magazine. She has written for Slate, The New York Times Magazine, The Daily Beast and Funny or Die. Catie is involved with The Moth and Upright Citizens Brigade Theater. The New Yorker covered the Employee of the Month live show with Jon Stewart:

For several years, the comedian Catie Lazarus has hosted a live talk show, “Employee of the Month,” with an accompanying weekly podcast, in which she interviews notable people—Jill Abramson, Rachel Maddow, Barney Frank, and Wallace Shawn among them—about their jobs. Her tone with guests is both playful and serious: Lazarus is a veteran of U.C.B., standup, and comedy writing, and she was once in a doctoral program in clinical psychology. “On my show, people say things that they don’t normally say,” she told me recently. Lewis Black teared up; the playwright Adam Rapp referred to the Times critic Charles Isherwood as an “asshole”; Gloria Steinem talked about the “f” word and did an elegant little dance.

On Thursday night, at Joe’s Pub, Lazarus interviewed Jon Stewart, a week after he announced that he was leaving “The Daily Show.”

Lazarus, who once played a woman in a mikvah in a “Daily Show” sketch about a prequel to “Hot Tub Time Machine,” took a broad approach to presenting Stewart’s career. “You may remember him from ‘Playing by Heart’ or ‘Death to Smoochy,’ ” she said. The band played “Born in the U.S.A.”—Stewart is from New Jersey—and he came onstage in a faded leather jacket and a gray hoodie the approximate color of his hair. He looked weathered but vital, up for a little after-work jam session. Joe’s Pub went wild with cheering.

Read more…

Here is Catie’s interview with Jon Stewart:

Image: c/o Employee of the Month

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20150303-catie-lazarus

Related links

[Twitter] follow @CatieLazarus on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Catie Lazarus on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

The second of four lectures in the Centralization and Decentralization series, hosted by the Allbritton Collaborative Course Cluster Initiative:

poster_cspl2

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

julia-s-star-resizedThe Julia‘s Star program brings Wesleyan students into contact with Middletown fifth graders, and through the interaction seeks to create a safe space for positive dialogue about identity, prejudice and stereotypes. Through the book Julia‘s Star and the discussion, we hope the students will understand the impact of stereotypes, both on a micro and a macro level. We hope they will learn how to share their identities and how to ask one another questions carefully and thoughtfully.

We are looking for student facilitators to join our program! The commitment is only for April and early May and includes a three hour training session, and then approximately 2-3 hours per week for the rest of the semester. The majority of that time will be spent facilitating classroom sessions. If you are interested in getting involved in this dialogue and/or want more information about the time commitment , please contact coordinator Sivan Battat sbattat@wesleyan.edu as soon as possible.

Reblogged from: Class of 2016. (Go to the original post…)

Alex Fireman was on study abroad in Ecuador last semester and shares these photos.

Antisana Ecological Reserve

Antisana Ecological Reserve–Antisana Volcano, the 4th highest volcano in Ecuador

Santa Lucia Cloud Forest Reserve

Santa Lucia Cloud Forest Reserve (NW of Quito)–Trail through the Cloud Forest

Tiputini Biological Station

Tiputini Biological Station (in Yasuní)–clouds rolling in over the Amazon at sunrise

Rio Zuñag Reserve

Rio Zuñag Reserve–Pristimantis galdi identified for my Independent Study Project

Isla Isabela, Las Galapagos

Isla Isabela, Las Galapagos–a massive lava flow on the island Isabela

DCIM100GOPRO

Galapagos–a sea lion seen while snorkeling

Older Posts »

Log in