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Reblogged from: Center for the Arts. (Go to the original post…)

These photos are from Monday, January 9 of the Volkswagen Brasilia that is part of one of the works in the upcoming exhibition, Clarissa Tossin: Stereoscopic Vision, being brought into the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery. The opening reception will be held on Tuesday, January 31 at 4:30 p.m.

Photos by John Elmore. Click here to view the entire album on Flickr.

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Reblogged from: ENGAGE – Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Wesleyan students have responded to the results of the 2016 Presidential Election in a variety of ways, including marches, protests, conversations, and more. Two students, Jacob Karlin ’17 and Olivia Morris ’18, looking to take direct action, headed up the #CallToAction phone bank at Wes. The goal is to bring different issues to the attention of state representatives, which will in turn hopefully influence policies over the next four years. This type of grassroots work meshes well with the mission of the Allbritton Center, and we were eager to learn about the motivation behind and the success of the #CallToAction phone bank from Jacob and Olivia.

Read on to learn what exactly #CallToAction was up to last semester, as well as ways to get involved this coming semester.

What is the #CallToAction?

  • #CallToAction is a weekly phone bank aiming to mobilize people to start dialogue with state representatives. Each week’s phone bank covers a specific topic. We provide information sheets, scripts focusing on the chosen issue, and representative’s phone numbers in Usdan 108. Our goal is to influence policy at the state level. We believe we will have the most success there in protecting our civil liberties on issues such as climate change, Immigration reform, reproductive health, police brutality, gun control, voter rights, LGBTQ+ rights, Obamacare, Muslim registration, Flint, etc. By facilitating dialogue with our representatives, we hope that #CallToAction will demonstrate the power of voices to create change.

How did you get together/get organized to start the phone bank? How do you find representatives’ contact information?IMG_9490

  • Olivia Morris ‘18 and I began to organize in the days following the election. We held interest meetings and information sessions to gather more interested students into various task forces. We were able to locate the information online.

Have you had any really exciting moments/successes?

  • We are amazed by the amount of time and energy our coordinators and Wesleyan student body have given to this campaign. The phone banks from the fall semester were extremely successful. Each successive phone bank has garnered a bigger crowd. Now, we are working to get other schools involved in hosting their own #CallToAction phone banks.

What’s the hardest part about calling representatives?

  • It is surprisingly easy! The hardest part is getting started. You talk to staffers who work in the representative’s office when calling; they are usually willing to listen to your concerns and direct them to their representative.


Do you feel like you are making an impact?

  • We are engaging Wesleyan students in participatory democracy, which impacts both their understanding of themselves as constituents and the representatives who must listen to the concerns of their constituency. While this is critical, the coordinators have discussed new ways to make #CallToAction even more successful/impactful, such as working more directly with the Connecticut government.

Are there ways for interested students to get involved in the spring semester?

  • Keep coming to our phone banks! We will have them every week this spring semester in Usdan during lunch. Day of the week TBD.

  • If students want to take a more active role in #CallToAction, we always need people behind the scenes to make each phone bank possible (research, graphic design, communications). Email jkarlin@wesleyan.edu or omorris@wesleyan.edu to get more involved.

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To read more about #CalltoAction, check out this article by The Argus.

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)

More than 100 Wesleyan University students are completing a full-semester course in two weeks as part of Winter Session 2017. Now in it’s fourth year, this is the highest enrollment to date.

Winter Session is held Jan. 9-24 and classes typically meet for four hours a day for 10 days.

Courses this year include Introduction to Digital Arts, taught by Christopher Chenier; The Dark Side of the Universe, taught by Edward Moran; Homer and the Epic, taught by Andrew Szegedy-Maszak; Introduction to Programming, taught by James Lipton; U.S. Foreign Policy, taught by Douglas Foyle; Masculinity, taught by Jill Morawski; and Applied Data Analysis taught by Lisa Dierker. View more Winter Session photos here

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)

Moon over Middletown, Jan. 11, 2017 at #Wesleyan University. 

Reblogged from: ENGAGE – Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

From Nicole Stanton ’15 and Kate Weiner ’15 of Loam Magazine, on the uncertainty of the years ahead and what we can do to support one another and the planet.

 

To our beloved supporters:

2017 is going to ask a lot of us as stewards of the earth. With the Trump Administration just two weeks away from taking office, we’re faced with unprecedented threats to the health of our climate and our communities. It’s vital that now, more than ever, we act from hope and not fear (thanks Michelle Obama for that beautiful reminder!) And it’s vital as well that we work in tandem with multiple movements to build a better world. The last few months have shown us how much hate exists in our country but also how much radical, world-building love. At Loam, we believe we can channel that love into positive ecological change. 

With more than 22,000 readers, we are capable of doing a whole lotta good. So just how can we work together? Here’s our plan in the new year: Perma_Cover

  • CREATE. Our next carbon neutral print issue of Loam, Permaculture in Practice, is a toolkit for radical change in the guise of a work of art. From exclusive content from the folks at The Tiny Mess to an interview with local food advocate Cyrus Sutton to a vibrant photoessay on the People’s Kitchen Collective, this issue of Loam is particularly rich in recipes, stories of resilience, herbal how-tos, and strategies for sustainable living. And in anticipation of the Inauguration, when you pre-order a copy this week, we will donate 10% of sales to the NRDC, an incredible organization working to heal our environment. 
  • COLLABORATE. This year, we’re moving from magazine into movement. We’ll be partnering with non-profits like The Ecology Center, Be Zero, and Island Earth on diverse retreats, events, and workshops to provide folks with the tangible tools to live sustainably, lobby for environmental change on a local level, and more. 
  • CULTIVATE. Creativity is key to thriving even in the face of fear. We’re going to continue to multiply opportunities to garden, make, and co-create for our beloved readers (like you!) whose support perpetually nourishes us and world.

 

Let’s embody hope, fearlessly.

 

With all our loamy love,

 

Nicole & Kate

@loammagazine

connect@loammagazine.com

loammagazine.com 

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Professor Steve Angle]Every year at Commencement, Wesleyan recognizes outstanding teaching with three Binswanger Prizes for Excellence in Teaching. These prizes, made possible by gifts from the family of the late Frank G. Binswanger Sr. Hon. ’85, underscore Wesleyan’s commitment to its scholar-teachers, who are responsible for the university’s distinctive approach to liberal arts education.

Recommendations are solicited from alumni of the last 10 graduating classes, as well as current juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Recipients are chosen by a selection committee of faculty and members of the Alumni Association Executive Committee.

Wesconnect caught up with former Binswanger Prize recipients to discuss their teaching careers and what it means to be recognized for their work.

WESCONNECT: Which professors have had an impact on you? How did that influence your teaching?

STEVE ANGLE: Two teachers from my undergraduate years at Yale stand out for the way they shaped me as a teacher. The first was Jonathan Spence, whose massively popular “Introduction to Modern Chinese History” course sparked my interest in China. It was not that course, though, that influenced my teaching: Wesleyan does not have 400-student history lectures! Rather, what I remember most was a seminar I took with Professor Spence during my sophomore year. His combination of warmth and intellectual seriousness was inspiring. Gone was the distant, semi-mythic figure performing each lecture up on a stage; now I could see that he cared about each one of us, challenging us to grow as students and as people. Although it is only as a result of this interview that I have fully realized it, Professor Spence long ago modeled for me what a teacher should be.

The teacher who really made an impact one me, I now see, was Yu Ying-shih, also an eminent historian. It was Professor Yu who first taught me about the fascinating world of Confucian philosophy. What was most important to me about his teaching was not its content nor his personality, though: it was the way that China and Chinese were present in our classroom. His lecture notes were in Chinese, despite the fact that he lectured in fluent English. Even when his topic was ancient history, the contested relevance of that history to modern-day China and Taiwan lurked in the background, peaking out here and there. Perhaps that is part of the reason that I ended up studying philosophy in graduate school, rather than history. It is certainly related to my own effort to make connections for my students between the abstract ideas we study together, and contemporary realities like the revival of Confucianism in contemporary China.

WC: What have been the pivotal moments of your teaching career at Wesleyan?

SA: I can think of several key developments, but what they all have in common is a desire to experiment with pedagogy and some willingness to take risks. One of the highlights of my “Classical Chinese Philosophy” course is the debate we hold half-way through the semester, with students representing three different schools of thought. The first time I did this, it was a last-minute decision made while walking to class. How could I effectively review what we’d been doing in an en engaging way, making sure every student in the room took an active part? And so was born the debate. (It does work even better, admittedly, when students have had time to prepare.)

A second innovation came as part of a First-Year Seminar, “Philosophy as a Way of Life.” All of the philosophers we read in that class clearly thought of their teachings as appropriately having effects on their readers, but how to honor that intention in a 21st-century classroom? The result was a final project in which each student chose one of our authors and endeavored to live his teachings for five days. The essays the students wrote we fascinating syntheses of personal and philosophical reflections, and in many cases, it seemed that the lessons learned went well beyond the class. I have since added similar exercises to several of my other classes.

Most recently, I have been able to make good on a long-standing desire and teach a class in Chinese, with Chinese readings and Chinese discussion, combining advanced learners and native speakers in the same classroom. This “Lab” class, loosely associated with my English-language “Classical Chinese Philosophy” class, has been a demanding but extremely rewarding experience. For many of the native speakers, it is an opportunity to express themselves with a depth and fluidity that is difficult in an English-language philosophy class; for the learners, it is a challenge like few others they have experienced—but also a terrific opportunity to learn philosophy and to stretch themselves as students of Chinese.

WC: How has your research evolved over the years? What are you working on right now?

SA: I am writing this from a high-speed train on my way back to Beijing, where I am spending a year’s sabbatical. Yesterday I had the remarkable experience of lecturing in Chinese, on the topic of “Confucian democracy,” at the ancient Songyang Academy, birthplace of Neo-Confucianism. A little less than 1000 years ago, great philosophers like Cheng Yi and Zhu Xi taught at this same academy, no doubt appreciating the shade of the same tree I sat beneath (I was told it is estimated to be 4500 years old!). I am excited about what I am learning from Chinese colleagues about the possibilities for Confucianism, and more broadly for Chinese culture, in the years ahead. I hope to continue to be able to break down boundaries between the U.S. and China and between Chinese-language philosophizing and English-language philosophizing. And I look forward to bringing this all back to Wesleyan starting in the fall of 2017.

Read more…

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20170110-steve-angle

#THISISWHY

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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Professor Steve Angle]Every year at Commencement, Wesleyan recognizes outstanding teaching with three Binswanger Prizes for Excellence in Teaching. These prizes, made possible by gifts from the family of the late Frank G. Binswanger Sr. Hon. ’85, underscore Wesleyan’s commitment to its scholar-teachers, who are responsible for the university’s distinctive approach to liberal arts education.

Recommendations are solicited from alumni of the last 10 graduating classes, as well as current juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Recipients are chosen by a selection committee of faculty and members of the Alumni Association Executive Committee.

Wesconnect caught up with former Binswanger Prize recipients to discuss their teaching careers and what it means to be recognized for their work.

WESCONNECT: Which professors have had an impact on you? How did that influence your teaching?

STEVE ANGLE: Two teachers from my undergraduate years at Yale stand out for the way they shaped me as a teacher. The first was Jonathan Spence, whose massively popular “Introduction to Modern Chinese History” course sparked my interest in China. It was not that course, though, that influenced my teaching: Wesleyan does not have 400-student history lectures! Rather, what I remember most was a seminar I took with Professor Spence during my sophomore year. His combination of warmth and intellectual seriousness was inspiring. Gone was the distant, semi-mythic figure performing each lecture up on a stage; now I could see that he cared about each one of us, challenging us to grow as students and as people. Although it is only as a result of this interview that I have fully realized it, Professor Spence long ago modeled for me what a teacher should be.

The teacher who really made an impact one me, I now see, was Yu Ying-shih, also an eminent historian. It was Professor Yu who first taught me about the fascinating world of Confucian philosophy. What was most important to me about his teaching was not its content nor his personality, though: it was the way that China and Chinese were present in our classroom. His lecture notes were in Chinese, despite the fact that he lectured in fluent English. Even when his topic was ancient history, the contested relevance of that history to modern-day China and Taiwan lurked in the background, peaking out here and there. Perhaps that is part of the reason that I ended up studying philosophy in graduate school, rather than history. It is certainly related to my own effort to make connections for my students between the abstract ideas we study together, and contemporary realities like the revival of Confucianism in contemporary China.

WC: What have been the pivotal moments of your teaching career at Wesleyan?

SA: I can think of several key developments, but what they all have in common is a desire to experiment with pedagogy and some willingness to take risks. One of the highlights of my “Classical Chinese Philosophy” course is the debate we hold half-way through the semester, with students representing three different schools of thought. The first time I did this, it was a last-minute decision made while walking to class. How could I effectively review what we’d been doing in an en engaging way, making sure every student in the room took an active part? And so was born the debate. (It does work even better, admittedly, when students have had time to prepare.)

A second innovation came as part of a First-Year Seminar, “Philosophy as a Way of Life.” All of the philosophers we read in that class clearly thought of their teachings as appropriately having effects on their readers, but how to honor that intention in a 21st-century classroom? The result was a final project in which each student chose one of our authors and endeavored to live his teachings for five days. The essays the students wrote we fascinating syntheses of personal and philosophical reflections, and in many cases, it seemed that the lessons learned went well beyond the class. I have since added similar exercises to several of my other classes.

Most recently, I have been able to make good on a long-standing desire and teach a class in Chinese, with Chinese readings and Chinese discussion, combining advanced learners and native speakers in the same classroom. This “Lab” class, loosely associated with my English-language “Classical Chinese Philosophy” class, has been a demanding but extremely rewarding experience. For many of the native speakers, it is an opportunity to express themselves with a depth and fluidity that is difficult in an English-language philosophy class; for the learners, it is a challenge like few others they have experienced—but also a terrific opportunity to learn philosophy and to stretch themselves as students of Chinese.

WC: How has your research evolved over the years? What are you working on right now?

SA: I am writing this from a high-speed train on my way back to Beijing, where I am spending a year’s sabbatical. Yesterday I had the remarkable experience of lecturing in Chinese, on the topic of “Confucian democracy,” at the ancient Songyang Academy, birthplace of Neo-Confucianism. A little less than 1000 years ago, great philosophers like Cheng Yi and Zhu Xi taught at this same academy, no doubt appreciating the shade of the same tree I sat beneath (I was told it is estimated to be 4500 years old!). I am excited about what I am learning from Chinese colleagues about the possibilities for Confucianism, and more broadly for Chinese culture, in the years ahead. I hope to continue to be able to break down boundaries between the U.S. and China and between Chinese-language philosophizing and English-language philosophizing. And I look forward to bringing this all back to Wesleyan starting in the fall of 2017.

Read more…

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20170110-steve-angle

#THISISWHY

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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Professor Stephanie Weiner]Every year at Commencement, Wesleyan recognizes outstanding teaching with three Binswanger Prizes for Excellence in Teaching. These prizes, made possible by gifts from the family of the late Frank G. Binswanger Sr. Hon. ’85, underscore Wesleyan’s commitment to its scholar-teachers, who are responsible for the university’s distinctive approach to liberal arts education.

Recommendations are solicited from alumni of the last 10 graduating classes, as well as current juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Recipients are chosen by a selection committee of faculty and members of the Alumni Association Executive Committee.

Wesconnect caught up with former Binswanger Prize recipients to discuss their teaching careers and what it means to be recognized for their work.

WESCONNECT: Which professors have had an impact on you? How did that influence your teaching?

STEPHANIE WEINER: I have been lucky to have had great teachers and professors from high school right on through college and graduate school. I now see that they were enormously dedicated to teaching and generous with their time and energy, but at the time I think I was mainly just inspired by their passion and by their ability to make me passionately interested in their fields. When I look back on the professors who influenced me most—Andrew Elfenbein at the University of Minnesota, my first teacher of nineteenth-century British literature, and Barbara Gelpi and Herbert Lindenberger at Stanford, my main advisors in graduate school and the professors who encouraged me to specialize in poetry––I can see how the questions I am still asking have their roots in courses I took all those years ago. On some basic level, those teachers taught me to ask an interesting question and then to read, research, and think with it in mind. And what they thought was interesting still seems interesting to me, too, twenty years later!

The professor who influenced my teaching most directly was Claude Reichard at Stanford, who taught the pedagogy seminar I took during my first year of teaching freshman composition. I still think about things Claude said over the course of that year, about syllabi and assignments, about useful and useless comments on student writing, about leading discussion in quiet classrooms and noisy ones, and about many other nuts-and-bolts and big philosophical issues in teaching. And it was from Claude that I learned the most important thing of all—how to think about pedagogy. He taught me how to reflect on what my goals are in a course or an assignment or a lesson plan, how to evaluate and keep working to shape what is happening in my classroom, and how to translate my aspirations for myself and my students into concrete actions.

WC: What have been the pivotal moments of your teaching career at Wesleyan?

SW: Every new course is a pivotal moment, and every new teaching format, so I remember vividly the first section of all the courses in my repertoire as well as my first large lecture course, my first super-intensive winter session class, my first Graduate Liberal Studies Program course, my first senior thesis advisee, and so on.

But more than pivotal moments, when I think about my teaching here I think about how consistently fulfilling it has always been. I was hooked on teaching at Wesleyan after my first week, and I’ve never stopped enjoying it. Wesleyan students, with their intelligence and creativity and earnest desire to learn, inspire me every day and make teaching incredibly fun.

WC: How has your research evolved over the years? What are you working on right now?

SW: My first book was about politics––I traced a tradition of nineteenth-century poets who were activists against the British monarch. My second book was about nature––I identified a set of techniques for accurately representing the natural world in poetic form and language. My current project is about language––I’m interested in “translations” from one version of English to another, usually movements from an earlier to a later “English” or from a regionally marked dialect to the metropolitan standard. In all these projects, I’ve been interested in how poets read one another and are shaped by their reading; in the special resources that poetic form offers writers; and in both the overlap and the divergence between everyday uses of language and the language of poetry.

WC: What has the Binswanger Prize meant to you?

SW: The Binswanger Prize is the most important and valuable professional honor I have ever received. The fact that the prize is awarded on the basis of nominations from students and alumni makes it incredibly meaningful. I am honored to think that students I taught years ago continue to value their learning in my courses.

Read more…

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20170109-stephanie-weiner

#THISISWHY

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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Professor Stephanie Weiner]Every year at Commencement, Wesleyan recognizes outstanding teaching with three Binswanger Prizes for Excellence in Teaching. These prizes, made possible by gifts from the family of the late Frank G. Binswanger Sr. Hon. ’85, underscore Wesleyan’s commitment to its scholar-teachers, who are responsible for the university’s distinctive approach to liberal arts education.

Recommendations are solicited from alumni of the last 10 graduating classes, as well as current juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Recipients are chosen by a selection committee of faculty and members of the Alumni Association Executive Committee.

Wesconnect caught up with former Binswanger Prize recipients to discuss their teaching careers and what it means to be recognized for their work.

WESCONNECT: Which professors have had an impact on you? How did that influence your teaching?

STEPHANIE WEINER: I have been lucky to have had great teachers and professors from high school right on through college and graduate school. I now see that they were enormously dedicated to teaching and generous with their time and energy, but at the time I think I was mainly just inspired by their passion and by their ability to make me passionately interested in their fields. When I look back on the professors who influenced me most—Andrew Elfenbein at the University of Minnesota, my first teacher of nineteenth-century British literature, and Barbara Gelpi and Herbert Lindenberger at Stanford, my main advisors in graduate school and the professors who encouraged me to specialize in poetry––I can see how the questions I am still asking have their roots in courses I took all those years ago. On some basic level, those teachers taught me to ask an interesting question and then to read, research, and think with it in mind. And what they thought was interesting still seems interesting to me, too, twenty years later!

The professor who influenced my teaching most directly was Claude Reichard at Stanford, who taught the pedagogy seminar I took during my first year of teaching freshman composition. I still think about things Claude said over the course of that year, about syllabi and assignments, about useful and useless comments on student writing, about leading discussion in quiet classrooms and noisy ones, and about many other nuts-and-bolts and big philosophical issues in teaching. And it was from Claude that I learned the most important thing of all—how to think about pedagogy. He taught me how to reflect on what my goals are in a course or an assignment or a lesson plan, how to evaluate and keep working to shape what is happening in my classroom, and how to translate my aspirations for myself and my students into concrete actions.

WC: What have been the pivotal moments of your teaching career at Wesleyan?

SW: Every new course is a pivotal moment, and every new teaching format, so I remember vividly the first section of all the courses in my repertoire as well as my first large lecture course, my first super-intensive winter session class, my first Graduate Liberal Studies Program course, my first senior thesis advisee, and so on.

But more than pivotal moments, when I think about my teaching here I think about how consistently fulfilling it has always been. I was hooked on teaching at Wesleyan after my first week, and I’ve never stopped enjoying it. Wesleyan students, with their intelligence and creativity and earnest desire to learn, inspire me every day and make teaching incredibly fun.

WC: How has your research evolved over the years? What are you working on right now?

SW: My first book was about politics––I traced a tradition of nineteenth-century poets who were activists against the British monarch. My second book was about nature––I identified a set of techniques for accurately representing the natural world in poetic form and language. My current project is about language––I’m interested in “translations” from one version of English to another, usually movements from an earlier to a later “English” or from a regionally marked dialect to the metropolitan standard. In all these projects, I’ve been interested in how poets read one another and are shaped by their reading; in the special resources that poetic form offers writers; and in both the overlap and the divergence between everyday uses of language and the language of poetry.

WC: What has the Binswanger Prize meant to you?

SW: The Binswanger Prize is the most important and valuable professional honor I have ever received. The fact that the prize is awarded on the basis of nominations from students and alumni makes it incredibly meaningful. I am honored to think that students I taught years ago continue to value their learning in my courses.

Read more…

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20170109-stephanie-weiner

#THISISWHY

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Professor James Lipton]Every year at Commencement, Wesleyan recognizes outstanding teaching with three Binswanger Prizes for Excellence in Teaching. These prizes, made possible by gifts from the family of the late Frank G. Binswanger Sr. Hon. ’85, underscore Wesleyan’s commitment to its scholar-teachers, who are responsible for the university’s distinctive approach to liberal arts education.

Recommendations are solicited from alumni of the last 10 graduating classes, as well as current juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Recipients are chosen by a selection committee of faculty and members of the Alumni Association Executive Committee.

Wesconnect caught up with former Binswanger Prize recipients to discuss their teaching careers and what it means to be recognized for their work.

WESCONNECT: Which professors have had an impact on you? How did that influence your teaching?

JAMES LIPTON: My teaching, I believe, has been deeply influenced by the approach and style of my best teachers. I was especially impressed by the excitement and command of the material shown by my first astronomy and physics teachers in my freshman year in college, and later, in deeper ways, by teachers in analysis, abstract algebra and logic. It is hard to find a unifying characteristic in the diversity of their approaches to teaching other than a capacity to share a sense of wonder for a beautiful subject, and perhaps a constant emphasis on what is commonly called the big picture: how each detail related to the overarching themes of the course and the reasons for studying the material in the first place.

I might add that most of the teachers I have in mind––but not all––had a certain air for presentation, and for reformulating the deeper themes of their courses in ways that addressed the main intuitions involved. New material, however unexpected and innovative, has to be connected if not to what a student already knows, at least to their intuition about the main motives and themes of the subject under study, even if the point is to challenge and disturb that intuition.

One of the points of choosing an academic career is to make learning a permanent feature of one’s life and this has certainly occurred in stimulating ways in mine in seminars and courses taken after my studies were officially over. In particular I am thinking of a course in category theory (a hot topic in mathematics and computer science) taken when I was a postdoc, lectures in the same subject I attended at Wesleyan years later, and recently a drawing course also taken here. Which have been the pivotal points in your teaching career at Wesleyan? There have been a number of moments when I sensed a strong rapport with students in a certain course and a deep connection on their part with the material. Such moments are worth their weight in gold. To this I would add that collaborating with students on senior projects or tutorials has often brought me a special satisfaction and new ways of appreciating the material being studied.

WC: What have been the pivotal points in your teaching career at Wesleyan?

JL: There have been a number of moments when I sensed a strong rapport with students in a certain course and a deep connection on their part with the material. Such moments are worth their weight in gold. To this I would add that collaborating with students on senior projects or tutorials has often brought a special satisfaction and new ways of appreciating the material being studied.

WC: How has your research evolved over the years? What are you working on right now?

JL: I started my research working with a topic in mathematical logic called realizability invented by Stephen Kleene in the 1950’s. I continued studying related material from several standpoints for a number of years. Curiously I am returning to the subject many years later. After this phase in my research life I moved on to the analysis of programming languages based on computing with relations and connected with mathematical logic (so-called declarative programming languages).

WC: What has the Binswanger Prize meant to you?

JL: It means a great deal, a kind of affirmation after years of trying to make my teaching reach goals connected to the issues I just raised above. I want material to reach students and inform their intuitions on the subject of study in a deep way. I want the details to connect with those intuitions and to matter. Receiving the prize has made me think that in some way I have met those objectives. It has also encouraged me to strive further to meet these and other goals. It is an invitation to improve my teaching in as many ways as I can.

Read more…

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20170108-james-lipton

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