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Reblogged from: Class of 2016. (Go to the original post…)

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History Matters… Careers.  Glenn Lunden ’83, NYC Transit Authority

Unknown-1Glenn Lunden graduated from Wesleyan in 1983 with a B.A. in History, concentrating on American History.  A 1981 Truman Scholar, he went on to earn a Master’s degree in Public Affairs and Urban and Regional Planning at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. A railroad enthusiast since childhood, Glenn often focused on transportation issues in many of his history, and economics classes at Wesleyan. He held a series of internships in public transportation, including at the Middletown (Ct.) Transit District, and the London Underground. After a brief stint at New Jersey Transit, he went to work for New York City Transit in 1986 and has been there ever since. At NYCT, Glenn has served in an array of planning and policy positions for the subway system, including service planning, fare policy, business planning, infrastructure and fleet planning, and operations analysis. Since 2013, he has been the Senior Director of Subways Schedules, responsible for managing the staff, who prepare the train timetables and crew assignments needed for 8,091 train trips a day and who analyze rail operations to develop strategies for improvement. Glenn lives with his life partner, Frank Meola, in Brooklyn, NY, and commutes (of course) by subway.

November 4, 2014, 12-NOON, PAC
Lunch will be served

Reblogged from: Center for the Arts. (Go to the original post…)

Center for the Arts Director Pamela Tatge discusses the development of the work “SPILL” by Leigh Fondakowski. Ms. Fondakowski will give a free talk about the future of “SPILL” on Thursday, October 30, 2014 at 7pm in CFA Hall.

Leigh Fondakowski

Leigh Fondakowski

As the third Outside the Box Theater Series event of the year, playwright Leigh Fondakowski will give a talk on Thursday, October 30, 2014 at 7pm in CFA Hall.

In 2011, Leigh Fondakowski co-taught The Deepwater Horizon Tragedy: A Scientific and Artistic Inquiry with Barry Chernoff in the College of the Environment. The goal of the course was to teach students the science of the Gulf Coast region and the ecological impact of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, as well as artistic tools and methods that enabled them to understand the science at a deeper level.

As part of the course, Ms. Fondakowski and Mr. Chernoff accompanied the students on a ten-day trip to the Gulf Coast region visiting laboratories and research institutions, touring wetlands, and meeting the people who live in the affected communities. Upon their return, the students created performances that combined science and art to tell the story of the effects of the spill.

This course inspired Ms. Fondakowski to write a new theatrical piece, commissioned by the Center for the Arts and funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and Wesleyan’s Creative Campus Initiative, which she entitled SPILL.

Ms. Fondakowski went back to Louisiana and collected over 200 hours of stories in the following months from people who lived in the parishes hardest hit by the disaster. In collaboration with visual artist Reeva Wortel (American Portrait Project),  Ms. Fondakowski created SPILL, which had its first staged reading at Wesleyan in February 2012.

Ms. Fondakowski returned to Wesleyan in the spring of 2013 to teach playwriting in the Theater Department.

Since then, Ms. Fondakowski has continued to work on the piece, including a presentation at the Culture Project‘s Women Center Stage Festival in New York in July 2013, followed by the premiere in March 2014  at the Reilly Theatre at Louisiana State University, performed by Baton Rouge’s Swine Palace.

In her talk this Thursday, Ms. Fondakowski will share the journey that her play has taken since she first showed it at Wesleyan, and will discuss its path for the future.

We hope you can join us.

Talk by Leigh Fondakowski on her work SPILL
Thursday, October 30, 2014 at 7pm
CFA Hall
FREE!

An Outside the Box Theater Series event presented by the Theater Department and the Center for the Arts.

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Media Project. (Go to the original post…)

Ad Spending Tops $1 Billion, Yet Ad Volume is Down From the Last Midterm Election

Over 600,000 Ads Sponsored by Groups; Almost 40 Percent Dark Money

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(MIDDLETOWN, CT) October 29, 2014 – Spending on television ads in federal and gubernatorial races in the 2013-14 election cycle has now topped $1 billion, with an estimated $1.19 billion spent from January 1, 2013 to October 23, 2014 (Table 1). That spending paid for over 2.2 million ad airings.

Including other races into the totals—other statewide offices, state representatives, ballot measures and local offices—raises airings to 2.96 million at an estimated cost of $1.67 billion.

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The volume of advertising in House, Senate and gubernatorial races is down slightly from the previous midterm election cycle, when 2,433,017 ads aired (January 1, 2009 through Oct. 23, 2010) at a cost of $1.189 billion.

Table 2 breaks down airings by party since September 1. In both races for the House and Senate, Democrats aired more ads overall this cycle. The Democratic advantage in Senate races is about 30,000 ads, while it is almost 55,000 ads in House races. Republicans hold an advantage of almost 28,000 ads in races for governor.

Compared to the last midterm election in 2010, the volume of advertising is down about 12 percent overall for the comparable time period (September 1 to October 23). Advertising in House races is down most significantly, 27 percent for Democratic ads and 37 percent for Republican spots. “The decline in House ads is consistent with the scope of the battleground this cycle,” said Michael Franz, co-director of the Wesleyan Media Project. “No one expects control of the House to be much in doubt. The clear struggle for control is in Senate races.” In Senate races, pro-Democratic ads are up over 37 percent compared to 2010. Republican Senate ads are down just slightly, by 7 percent.

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North Carolina Senate Race Most Intense, Expensive

Table 3 shows the volume of advertising and estimated spending in the most competitive Senate races over the last two weeks. Topping the list is North Carolina, where television stations have aired over 20,000 ads during that time period. Ads supporting Democrat Kay Hagen outnumbered ads supporting Thom Tillis by about 4,000. Iowa had the second most intense Senate race in the past two weeks with over 17,000 ads aired. Ads favoring Republican Joni Ernst outnumbered ads favoring Democrat Bruce Braley by about 1,700.

Republicans continue to be helped by outside groups more than Democrats. In almost all races, a greater share of pro-Republican advertising than pro-Democratic advertising came from outside groups.

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The most expensive race so far in the 2013-14 election cycle was in North Carolina, where an estimated $62 million has been spent on advertising. This is followed by Georgia, Colorado, Kentucky and Michigan. Although the bulk of the spending is for general election races, some of the ad spending in each of these states was used for primary contests.

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Table 5 shows the most intense House races over the past two weeks. Georgia-12 tops the list, with the most ads aired, and is followed by Florida-02, Arizona-02, California-07 and WV-03.

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Table 6 reports the same information for gubernatorial races. There was a striking imbalance in the volume of Republican and Democratic advertising in a few states. Pro-Republican advertising was much more common in Florida and Texas than was pro-Democratic advertising, while in New York, pro-Democratic ads outnumbered pro-Republican ads by an 18 to 1 margin.

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Table 7 shows the most expensive gubernatorial races this cycle. Florida heads the list, with an estimated $77 million spent to air over 137,000 ads. Florida is followed by Illinois, Pennsylvania, Texas and Michigan.

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Denver, Little Rock Most Inundated by Ads

Table 8 reports the volume and estimated cost of advertising that has aired in the top media markets this election cycle (inclusive of all political ads). In Denver, over 78,000 ads have aired at an estimated cost of $77 million. Little Rock, Arkansas, has seen over 50,000 ads this cycle, as has Tampa, Florida.

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Just 26 Percent of Senate Ads Positive

Table 9 reports the percentage of ads classified as positive, negative and contrast (mentioning both a preferred candidate and an opponent) in the 2010, 2012 and 2014 election cycles for the September 1-October 23 period. Just 26 percent of ads aired since September 1 in Senate races were positive, with another 52 percent being purely negative. House and gubernatorial races were comparatively more positive during that same time period. Thirty-one percent of ads aired in House races were positive, and 35 percent of ads aired in gubernatorial races were positive.
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“Since 2000, the percentage of negativity has been rising in each election cycle, but it seems we may have finally reached a plateau,” said Erika Franklin Fowler, co-director of the Wesleyan Media Project. “Negativity this cycle has been comparable to past levels. Gubernatorial ads are more negative this year than they have been previously, but House ads are less negative. Senate ads are slightly more negative than 2010 but less negative than 2012. Any way you count them, however, attack ads continue to dominate the airwaves.”

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The Wesleyan Media Project is launching a new initiative and new web presence today – AttackAds.org – aimed at educating voters about attack ads and dark money thanks to funding from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. To read more about the launch, click here.

Table 10 breaks down ad tone in 2014 by party, race and sponsorship. Parties have been the most negative, followed by groups. Republican-leaning groups, although still engaging in considerable negativity, have been more positive than Democratic-leaning groups.

“Groups, especially groups that favor Republicans, are trying something new this year, which is actually running some positive ads,” said Travis Ridout, co-director of the Wesleyan Media Project. “In recent election cycles, group-sponsored advertising has been almost universally negative.”

Some party differences also emerge from Table 10. In Senate races, Democrats have aired a greater percentage of negative ads (57 to 47 percent), while Republicans have focused more on airing contrast ads (27 percent to Democrats’ 17 percent). In the House, however, pro-Democratic and pro-Republican advertising has been equally negative at around 46 percent.

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Table 11 ranks the Senate races by their share of pure positive ads since September 1, starting with the least positive race. Louisiana takes top honors, followed by North Carolina, Kansas, Georgia and Kentucky. But the Senate race with the greatest share of pure negative ads was North Carolina’s contest, followed by Arkansas and Michigan.

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Figure 1 graphically displays the proportion of negative and contrast ads in Senate races across the country as measured by the total number of airings in each race.

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Figure 1: Percent of Ads that are Negative or Contrast in U.S. Senate Races (9/1-10/23/14)
2014Release6_Figure1a
Numbers are based on ongoing Wesleyan Media Project coding of Kantar Media/CMAG video of ads in House and Senate races.
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Connecticut’s gubernatorial race takes the crown for least positive race for governor (Table 12). Just 15 percent of ads aired in that race since September 1 were positive. Second on the list is Illinois, followed by New Mexico, Florida and Pennsylvania. Connecticut’s race also has the greatest share of pure negative ads, at 69.6 percent.

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House Majority PAC Becomes Top Group Spender

House Majority PAC aired the most ads—and was also the biggest interest group spender—over the October 10-23 period, airing almost 7,000 ads at an estimated cost of $8.7 million (Table 13). The group was active in over 20 different House races. The Republican Governors Association aired 5,500 ads in races in 8 states, while Crossroads GPS and its cousin American Crossroads, each aired about 5,000 ads, mostly in Senate races.

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The biggest group spenders this election cycle are shown in Table 14. Since January 1, 2013, the Republican Governors Association has spent almost $23.3 million to air almost 45,000 ads. They are followed closely by Senate Majority PAC, Crossroads Grassroots Policy Strategies and Americans for Prosperity.

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38 Percent of Group-Sponsored Ads Paid for with Dark Money

A Wesleyan Media Project analysis, in partnership with the Center for Responsive Politics, shows that over 600,000 group-sponsored ads have aired in House, Senate and gubernatorial races since the beginning of the 2013-14 election cycle (Table 15). Thus, groups have sponsored 27.2 percent of ads aired this election cycle in federal and gubernatorial races.

Among those 600,000-plus ads, 37.8 percent were paid for with “dark money,” groups whose donors are not being disclosed. Another 3.6 percent of group-sponsored ad airings this cycle were sponsored by groups that only partially disclose their donors.
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“These opaque groups are spending more money than ever and making up a larger portion of election spending,” said Sheila Krumholz, executive director of the Center for Responsive Politics, a Wesleyan Media Project partner. “As a result, voters lack information they need to understand which individuals or organizations are trying to influence their vote.”

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Much of the dark money advertising has appeared in congressional races. In the Senate, 48.6 percent of group airings were backed by dark money, and these groups additionally sponsored 43.8 percent of group airings in the House. In races for governor, however, only 16.3 percent of group-sponsored ads were backed by dark money.

There were also party differences in the use of dark money. Forty-eight percent of the airings from Republican-leaning groups were from groups that do not disclose their donors. Among, Democratic-leaning groups, 23 percent of ads were paid for with dark money.

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Figure 2 reveals the volume of advertising by sponsorship (candidate, party, fully-disclosing group, partially-disclosing group or non-disclosing group) and by party for five top Senate races. Bars above the line indicate Republican advertising, while bars below the line indicate Democratic advertising. The figure shows, first, how the volume of advertising has picked up heading toward Election Day. In addition, the figure shows considerably greater volumes of group advertising on the Republican side. Finally, the figure shows that a greater proportion of Republican group-sponsored advertising comes from non-disclosing and partially-disclosing groups compared to Democratic group-sponsored advertising. Figures showing the same data for Senate races in Arkansas, Colorado, Iowa and North Carolina are also available (PDF).

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Figure 2: Ad Buys in Top 5 Senate Races, By Disclosure and Type
2014Release6_Figure1
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Figure 3 shows how the extent of disclosure compares to 2012 in the 5 top Senate races in each year. Bars above the 0 point indicate the volume of advertising in 2014 by source (candidate, party, fully disclosing group, partially disclosing group or non-disclosing group). Bars below the 0 point indicate the same information for 2012. Not only has the overall volume of advertising in the top Senate races increased over 2012, but the volume of dark money has as well.

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Figure 3: Ad Buys Over Time in Top 5 Senate Races, 2012 and 2014, By Disclosure and Type
2014Release6_Figure2
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GOP House Candidates Talk Obamacare, Taxes, Jobs; Dems Talk Taxes, Social Welfare Issues

Table 16 shows the top issues mentioned in House advertising since September 1, broken down by party. The issue featured most often in ads favoring Democrats is taxation, a mention of which appears in 29 percent of ads. Taxation is followed by Medicare, Social Security and education as most-mentioned issues in pro-Democratic advertising. On the Republican side, Obamacare is the most frequently mentioned issue, appearing in 26 percent of ads. Discussion of taxation, jobs and budgets/deficits follow.

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Table 17 lists the top issue mentions in sixteen Senate races, by party. In only three states (Georgia, Kentucky, and Minnesota) are the top issue mentions the same in Democratic and Republican advertising. Obamacare is the top issues mentioned in ads favoring Republicans in five of the sixteen states, while budget and deficits get top billing in four states. Immigration features highly in pro-Republican advertising in Louisiana, appearing in almost two out of three ads. The top issue mentioned in pro-Democratic Senate advertising varies considerably across states. Women’s health, for instance, is mentioned in almost half of ads favoring the Democrat in Colorado.

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Negative Mentions of Affordable Care Act Continue to Rise

The number of ads mentioning the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) continues to rise as Election Day approaches (Figure 4). About 45,000 ads in the past two weeks mentioned the ACA, the vast majority of which (almost 40,000) mentioned the ACA in a negative fashion. The few ads that are not-anti ACA can at best be characterized as obliquely discussing the law using references to a candidate “standing up to insurance companies,” etc.

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“Campaign ads attacking the Affordable Care Act continue to rise in number as we head into the upcoming enrollment period,” said Erika Franklin Fowler, co-director of the Wesleyan Media Project. “How the negative political messaging interacts with insurance advertising may be important in understanding citizen attitudes, information and behavior.”

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Figure 4: Volume of Ads Referencing the Affordable Care Act (House/Senate Airings Only)
2014Release6_Figure3
Numbers are based on ongoing Wesleyan Media Project coding of Kantar Media/CMAG video of ads in House and Senate races.
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Anger Outpaces Fear and Enthusiasm in Senate Races

Figure 5 shows the percentage of ads over time in Senate races making appeals to anger, enthusiasm and fear. There was a small uptick in the use of fear appeals earlier this month, but anger remains the dominant emotional appeal in Senate advertising—and anger’s use has been growing since the end of September. On October 19, for instance, just under 75 percent of ads aired in Senate races made an appeal to anger.

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Figure 5: Appeals in U.S. Senate Races
2014Release6_Figure4
Figures are from September 1 to October 23, 2014 of and are based on ongoing Wesleyan Media Project coding of Kantar Media/CMAG video.

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Table A1: Volume and Estimated Cost of Advertising in US Senate Races by Sponsor

Table A2: Volume and Estimated Cost of Advertising in US Gubernatorial Races by Sponsor

About This Report

Data reported here do not cover local cable buys, only broadcast television and national cable buys. All cost estimates are precisely that: estimates. Content information is based on ongoing Wesleyan Media Project coding and analysis of Kantar Media/CMAG video, which is 95% complete for the time period discussed (99% complete for U.S. Senate races and 86% complete for U.S. House races). Intercoder reliability is high for measures of tone (94% agreement and a Kappa score of 0.91). Disclosure categorization information on interest groups comes from the Center for Responsive Politics.

The Wesleyan Media Project provides real-time tracking and analysis of all political television advertising in an effort to increase transparency in elections. Housed in Wesleyan’s Quantitative Analysis Center – part of the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life – the Wesleyan Media Project is the successor to the Wisconsin Advertising Project, which disbanded in 2009. It is directed by Erika Franklin Fowler, assistant professor of government at Wesleyan University, Michael M. Franz, associate professor of government at Bowdoin College and Travis N. Ridout, associate professor of political science at Washington State University. Laura Baum is the Project Manager.

The Wesleyan Media Project
is supported by grants from The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation and Wesleyan University. Data provided by Kantar Media/CMAG with analysis by the Wesleyan Media Project using Academiclip, a web-based coding tool. The Wesleyan Media Project is partnering in 2014 with both the Center for Responsive Politics, to provide added information on interest group disclosure, and Ace Metrix, to assess ad effectiveness.

The Center for Responsive Politics is the nation’s premier research group tracking money in U.S. politics and its effect on elections and public policy. Nonpartisan, independent and nonprofit, the organization aims to create a more educated voter, an involved citizenry and a more transparent and responsive government. CRP’s award-winning website, OpenSecrets.org, is the most comprehensive resource available anywhere for federal campaign contribution and lobbying data and analysis.

Periodic releases of data will be posted on the project’s website and dispersed via Twitter @wesmediaproject. To be added to our email update list, click here.
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For more information contact:
Lauren Rubenstein, lrubenstein@wesleyan.edu, (860) 685-3813

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About Wesleyan University
Wesleyan University, in Middletown, Conn., is known for the excellence of its academic and co-curricular programs. With more than 2,900 undergraduates and 200 graduate students, Wesleyan is dedicated to providing a liberal arts education characterized by boldness, rigor and practical idealism. For more, visit www.wesleyan.edu.

About the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation
Knight Foundation supports transformational ideas that promote quality journalism, advance media innovation, engage communities and foster the arts. We believe that democracy thrives when people and communities are informed and engaged. For more, visit www.knightfoundation.org.

About the MacArthur Foundation
The MacArthur Foundation supports creative people and effective institutions committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. In addition to selecting the MacArthur Fellows, the Foundation works to defend human rights, advance global conservation and security, make cities better places, and understand how technology is affecting children and society. More information is at www.macfound.org.

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Media Project. (Go to the original post…)

MIDDLETOWN, CONN. – (October 29, 2014) – Interest group advertising in U.S. Senate campaigns is at an all-time high, and advertising from dark money groups is breaking records.  America’s airwaves are filled with much more negativity than they were a decade ago.  AttackAds.org, a new initiative from the Wesleyan Media Project, launches today.  The initiative, made possible by funding from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, includes an educational website, a parody ad about negativity and unknown group sponsors, and a short documentary that defines attack advertising, highlights trends in its use and explains its link to dark money.  The website also contains graphics describing trends in the use of attack advertising and a quiz about attack advertising.

 

“Attack ads have attacked our airwaves in record numbers,” said Eric Newton, senior adviser to the president at the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, a supporter of the Wesleyan Media Project. “Politicians of all stripes are free to use them — but, thankfully, informed voters are free to ignore them. Wesleyan’s Media Project has become the best source of facts about the negativity invading political advertising.”

 

The Wesleyan Media Project was established in 2010 with support from Knight Foundation.  Its primary goals are to increase transparency in elections, educate voters and serve as a resource for journalists and policymakers.   Since its founding, the project has tracked and analyzed all broadcast advertisements aired on behalf of federal and statewide election candidates in all of the country’s media markets. So far this cycle, hundreds of news articles have cited the project’s data, frequently quoting analysis from the project’s co-directors.

 

The new initiative, AttackAds.org, is designed more explicitly for the public to help provide information on negativity, outside interest groups and campaign finance.

logoBlack.fw

 

About Wesleyan University

Wesleyan University, in Middletown, Conn., is known for the excellence of its academic and co-curricular programs. With more than 2,900 undergraduates and 200 graduate students, Wesleyan is dedicated to providing a liberal arts education characterized by boldness, rigor and practical idealism.

 

About the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation

Knight Foundation supports transformational ideas that promote quality journalism, advance media innovation, engage communities and foster the arts. We believe that democracy thrives when people and communities are informed and engaged. For more, visit www.knightfoundation.org.

 

 

CONTACTS:

Lauren Rubenstein, lrubenstein@wesleyan.edu, (860) 685-3813

Anusha Alikhan, Director of Communications, Knight Foundation, 305-908-2677, media@knightfoundation.org

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Aditi Kini ’13

[Ilya Marritz ’99]An icon of the sharing economy, Airbnb has run into legal woes in New York City, with Attorney General Eric Schneiderman documenting the extent of the illegal rentals. WYNC business reporter Ilya Marritz ’99 reports.

Airbnb has a problem. The website for short-term room rentals is growing quickly. But in many cities, these rentals are illegal. Now, New York’s attorney general has documented the extent of the illegal activity, by delving into the company’s business records.

Almost three-quarters of New York City bookings appear to break the law, he says.

[New York Attorney General Eric] Schneiderman estimates New York is owed $33 million in hotel taxes. Sure, Airbnb helps people like Irene make ends meet. But Schneiderman argues the market is actually dominated by a small number of people renting out a large number of beds. “The highest-earning operation had 272 apartments that they were renting out, and they booked more than 3,000 reservations and received $6.8 million,” Schneiderman said.

Read more…

Image: c/o Amy Pearl/WNYC

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20141029-ilya-marritz

Related links

[Twitter] follow @ilyamarritz on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Ilya Marritz on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Aditi Kini ’13

[Ilya Marritz ’99]An icon of the sharing economy, Airbnb has run into legal woes in New York City, with Attorney General Eric Schneiderman documenting the extent of the illegal rentals. WYNC business reporter Ilya Marritz ’99 reports.

Airbnb has a problem. The website for short-term room rentals is growing quickly. But in many cities, these rentals are illegal. Now, New York’s attorney general has documented the extent of the illegal activity, by delving into the company’s business records.

Almost three-quarters of New York City bookings appear to break the law, he says.

[New York Attorney General Eric] Schneiderman estimates New York is owed $33 million in hotel taxes. Sure, Airbnb helps people like Irene make ends meet. But Schneiderman argues the market is actually dominated by a small number of people renting out a large number of beds. “The highest-earning operation had 272 apartments that they were renting out, and they booked more than 3,000 reservations and received $6.8 million,” Schneiderman said.

Read more…

Image: c/o Amy Pearl/WNYC

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20141029-ilya-marritz

Related links

[Twitter] follow @ilyamarritz on Twitter ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Ilya Marritz on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

We are pleased to announce that Ann Cooper Albright’s book Engaging Bodies: The Politics and Poetics of Corporeality, has been selected as the winner of the Selma Jeanne Cohen Prize in Dance Aesthetics.

albright blog

The prize honors Selma Jeanne Cohen‘s work in dance theory, dance history, and dance aesthetics, and is funded by a bequest from her estate. The winner will be publicly announced during the national meeting of the ASA on October 29 to November 1, 2014 in San Antonio, Texas.

The American Society for Aesthetics was founded in 1942 to promote study, research, discussion, and publication in aesthetics. “Aesthetics,” in this connection, is understood to include all studies of the arts and related types of experience from a philosophic, scientific, or other theoretical standpoint, including those of psychology, sociology, anthropology, cultural history, art criticism, and education. “The arts” include the visual arts, literature, music, and theater arts.

The ASA publishes the Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism and The ASA Newsletter.

Careers in History Event

Reblogged from: class of 2015. (Go to the original post…)

Careers in History Event

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This lunch talk by our alumn, Glenn Lunden ’83, who is now a Senior Director of Subway Schedules, will inaugurate conversations we plan to have about the variety of careers History majors have. Next semester we will have several events, including with some alumni from the last decade with different career paths.

I hope you will come next week to meet Glenn Lunden, and other students and faculty.

History Matters… Careers Lunch talk sponsored by the History Department

Glenn Lunden ’83, NYC Transit Authority
“History Track / Career Track / Railroad Track.”

Glenn Lunden graduated from Wesleyan in 1983 with a B.A. in History, concentrating on American History. A 1981 Truman Scholar, he went on to earn a Master’s degree in Public Affairs and Urban and Regional Planning at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

A railroad enthusiast since childhood, Glenn often focused on transportation issues in many of his history, and economics classes at Wesleyan. He held a series of internships in public transportation, including at the Middletown (Ct.) Transit District, and the London Underground. After a brief stint at New Jersey Transit, he went to work for New York City Transit in 1986 and has been there ever since. At NYCT, Glenn has served in an array of planning and policy positions for the subway system, including service planning, fare policy, business planning, infrastructure and fleet planning, and operations analysis.

Since 2013, he has been the Senior Director of Subways Schedules, responsible for managing the staff, who prepare the train timetables and crew assignments needed for 8,091 train trips a day and who analyze rail operations to develop strategies for improvement. Glenn lives with his life partner, Frank Meola, in Brooklyn, NY, and commutes (of course) by subway.

November 4, 2014, 12-NOON, PAC
Lunch will be served

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)



Sunset on College Row near Zelnick Pavilion, Oct. 27. 

Reblogged from: Alumni Helpdesk - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

[alert]Our users might have heard about the “POODLE” security bug that was recently discovered in the technology that helps to secure web pages (specifically in SSL 3.0, which provides the s in https:// on older web browsers).

To protect users’ personal data and transaction details University Relations’ vendors are disabling support for older browsers that use the affected technology. This includes IE6 (Microsoft Internet Explorer 6), IE7 (Microsoft Internet Explorer 7), and Windows XP.

Most users won’t notice a change, but anyone using the affected technologies will be unable to access Wesleyan’s secure pages for actions such as logging in to Wesconnect, registering for events, making donations, etc.

As an added precaution, we suggest that all members of the extended Wesleyan community (alumni, parents, and friends) test their web browsers and take the recommended steps to disable SSL 3.0.

If you have any questions or concerns please let us know and we will get right back to you.

Further information

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