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Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

2017’ers–

1. New Course:

Check out this new course in the Dance Department–Performance Matters:  Creating Performance on Specific Topics—taught by Prof. Katya Kolcio in Spring 2015.

2. Civic Engagement Certificate Open House—12/2

Come to the CEC info session on Dec. 2, Noon-1 p.m. in Allbritton.  The CEC is open to students of all disciplines who are interested in questions of citizenship and democracy and who seek to enhance and reflect on their civic activities.  Check it out!

3. Internship/Job Strategies

This short list is excerpted from the Internship Workshop by Persephone Hall of the WCC:

  1. “What do I need and want to learn?  What do I have to offer?”  Identify a list of each for yourself and then talk with others to supplement.  Pursue opportunities in all areas of interest.
  2. Give yourself time.  Looking for an I/J is a job in itself.  What’s your plan?
  3. Use your resources:  LinkedIn, WesConnect, Indeed.com, Liberal Arts Career Network (LCAN—on WCC website), Career Drive (in your portfolio), faculty, personal acquaintances

See the Celebrating Students column for Fred Ayres ’17 and Lili Kadets ’17on their internship/work experiences.  Please share your own!!

Best, Dean Brown

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

On behalf of the Religion Department, I would like to invite you to a public lecture by Dr. Joshua Dubler ’97, Assistant Professor of Religion at the University of Rochester, this coming Monday, Nov. 24, at 4:15 pm, in 001 PAC.

The lecture is entitled: “Prisons, Religion, and the Cultural Logic of Mass Incarceration.”

Here is a brief description of the lecture: Drawing on his recent book, Down in the Chapel: Religious Life in an American Prison (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2013), Dubler explores the role played by religious ideas and practices in nurturing the American prison boom. Special attention will be given to prisoners’ religion–how it is practiced, how it is regulated, and how it is popularly imagined.

The lecture is being co-sponsored by the African American Studies Program, the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life, the American Studies Department, the Anthropology Department, the College of Letters, the Government Department, and the University Chaplains.

Ron Cameron, Professor of Religion

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

The Department of Dance is pleased to announce an exciting new course for the spring semester:

NEW COURSE: Performance Matters: Creating Performance on Specific Topics

DANC 240 Spring 2015

This course introduces dance as a method of inquiry based in the physical, creative body and performance. This special offering is specifically designed for students interested in applying dance and performance toward a particular theme, question, topic, or area of research. Students are expected to come with a specific area of interest in mind, and ready to ask “In what ways can dance and performance deepen my understanding of…”

https://iasext.wesleyan.edu/regprod/!wesmaps_page.html?crse=014227&term=1151

Flu Shots….

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

thumbnailCA1W2X0ZIf you missed the campus-wide flu clinic but would like a flu shot, please call the Health Center for an appointment at 860-685-2470.  The Health Center will offer them through the end of the semester while supplies last.

Resolution 2.36

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Student Assembly. (Go to the original post…)

On November 2nd of this year, a resolution was passed by the WSA in an attempt to promote transparency and communication at Wesleyan. This resolution was passed in order to strengthen the communication between the administration and students, and to elevate the feeling that students know who is running their school and making the decisions that most impact their lives. Too often issues may go unaddressed, and it is important for students to be able to hear all sides of the story, and for there to be accountability on the part of both the students and the administration. All these factors being true the resolution will hopefully also strengthen the sense of community in the goings on of the school. With that being said, the resolution calls for two things. Firstly, it calls for a quarterly report to be distributed from the Office of the President with editorials addressed to the population from the Vice President for Student Affairs and the Vice President for Academic Affairs on issues that are pertinent to the student body. It is in this way that the student body may be made more aware of the university’s desire to acknowledge and address the utmost concerns of their students. The second part of the resolution calls for an annual State of the Students address to be delivered to the students from the Office of the President at either the beginning or middle of the academic year. This will also increase transparency in the goings on of the school and allow students a greater sense of agency in their own institution.

See Resolution 2.36 at wsa.wesleyan.edu/about/documents.

The post Resolution 2.36 appeared first on Wesleyan Student Assembly.

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

Saturday, November 22   8 p.m.   Crowell Concert Hall

Wesleyan University Orchestra and Wesleyan Concert Choir present an evening of fun popular holiday classics!

Tchaikovsky, Four Dances from “The Nutcracker”
Leontovich, Carol of the Bells
Lopez, Orchestral Suite from “Frozen”
Anderson, The Christmas Festival

Includes announcement of the results of the audience vote on a large-scale composition for the May 2015 concert
AND
an audience sing-along!

Reblogged from: Creative Campus. (Go to the original post…)

Muslim Women’s Voices at Wesleyan Documentation Intern Brittany Benham reflects on her behind the scenes experience with Muslim Women’s Voices.

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It was 9am on a Saturday and instead of being curled up in bed, I was running through the Usdan University Center, spilling coffee, scarfing down a croissant, and waving to other tired souls also awake at this hour. In my haste, something yanked me back and I embarrassingly had to unlatch my sweater from the door hinge and hurriedly tumble out onto the steps leading to the CFA. That morning I was not playing the role of the average college student, but putting on my hat as the Documentation Intern for Muslim Women’s Voices at Wesleyan.

Muslim Women’s Voices at Wesleyan is a year-long program at the Center for that Arts that is designed to expand awareness, knowledge, and understanding of Muslim cultures through the lens of performance. As the student intern with Muslim Women’s Voices (MWV), my job is to oversee the documentation of the performances, lectures, and residencies of the artists who have been chosen to be a part of the program. In the effort to create a series of mini-documentaries for each individual performer and a larger film that features all of the events included in the program, interviews are a prime resource for personal background information and greater context. In this particular morning’s rush, I was heading over to Crowell Concert Hall where the women who would perform later that night in Beckham Hall as part of the Planet Hip Hop Festival Concert were waiting to be directed towards their one-on-ones with the MWV program manager and journalists from the Islamic Monthly magazine.

Interviews can be awkward – do I look at the camera or at the interviewer? Is there something in my teeth? What happens if I can’t think of anything to say? These are the kinds of uncertainties that we as program leaders have to address to make sure our interviewees are comfortable and can focus on the questions that we ask. Usually, that means starting with easily answerable questions which can guide the interviewees to harder or more personal questions as the interview progresses.

Before we could begin, the camera needed to be set up in a favorable position and adjusted for changes in light and sound levels. Our videographer kindly asked me to sit in the interviewee chair so he could make the necessary arrangements and although I knew the camera was not rolling and questions about my childhood and my faith were not being aimed in my direction, I still felt a bit of unease. I was happy to hand the seat over to each performer when the time came and marveled at the confidence with which they carried themselves, something I had internally lacked while I was being put on the spot.

While the interviews were taking place, I was quietly seated off to the side listening to what each performer had to say – heard their stories, their triumphs and their failures, their histories – and I was inspired by their words. The ease with which these women were able to convey some of their most innate beliefs and intimate personal memories allowed me too see past their performance persona and into their lives. And although I knew that they were being taped for documentary purposes and I was specifically seeking out sound bytes that would be appropriate for our videos, I was also able to listen to the back-and-forth conversation between my program manager and the performer as if it were just that, a conversation.

I considered this idea – that how one presents oneself in a conversation could be drastically different from how one presents oneself knowing that whatever is said will be recorded – and realized that this must be how these women feel when they are performing. One woman was wearing neon trainers to her interview that morning then came out on stage later in the night in the most amazing zebra-print platform heels I have ever seen. Maybe we all do this, dichotomize our life in the form of multiple identities – our life in our trainers and our life in our stilettos.

Once the interviews were finished, the videographer prompted each performer to convey a series of emotions towards or away from the camera. “It feels really awkward but it comes out really beautiful” we all promised. And it did – in the final video, the emotion and sass and personality of these women seemed so effortlessly captured. Perhaps with a camera staring them in the face, the only thing that they could do was stare back, and in an infinite moment, something real was captured. It seemed amazing how an interaction with the vast darkness of a lens felt more invasive and scrutinizing than the gaze of hundreds of students at the final concert.

Our videographer calls these shots “moving portraits” and I would like to think that it is not the slow panning of the camera that he is referring to, but the reaction from an audience that views such an intimate and personal image. Somehow, the seconds of awkwardness and insecurity that inevitably arise as a consequence of this type of videography creates something only reserved for the world of fine art, a portrait.

As I considered the emotional intensity of the interviews and the off-camera personalities of these women I wondered, is identity a performance or a conversation? Maybe the performers, lecturers, and participants of Muslim Women’s Voices at Wesleyan can help us figure that out.

Reblogged from: Class of 2016. (Go to the original post…)

grading mode change formThe last day to withdraw from full-semester and second-quarter classes for the Fall 2014 semester is Tuesday, November 25. Completed forms are due in the Registrar’s Office by 5:00 p.m. and must include the following signatures: instructor, faculty advisor, and class dean.

If you are thinking about withdrawing from a course:

  • Do use this time to talk to your professors, your advisors, and me about your concerns. If you can’t make my drop-ins, please email me at dphillips@wesleyan.edu or call me at x2757 to schedule an appointment.
  • Do make sure you are taking advantage of all the resources available to you.
  • Do get the signatures of your instructor and advisor on your drop/add form. I cannot sign for either without his or her permission, so please save yourself the trouble of waiting to see me during drop-ins just for me to tell you that.
  • Do not wait until Tuesday at 4:00 p.m. to see me or you may find yourself waiting in a very long line!!!

Drop-in Hours: M 2-3; Tu 3-4; W 5-7; Th 11-12; F 2-4

Reblogged from: Center for Jewish Studies Blog. (Go to the original post…)

Magda Teter’s  book, Sinners on Trial: Jews and Sacrilege after the Reformation (Harvard University Press) has received an Honorable Mention in the Medieval and Early Modern Jewish History category of the 2014 Jordan Schnitzer Book Awards.  The Schnitzer Book Award was established in 2007 to recognize and promote outstanding scholarship in the field of Jewish Studies and to honor scholars whose work embodies the best in the field: innovative research, excellent writing, and sophisticated methodology.  In recognizing Teter’s book Sinners on Trial: Jews and Sacrilege after the Reformation (Harvard University Press), the Prize Committee wrote: In this beautifully written and richly documented work, Magda Teter traces and convincingly demonstrates the interdependence of economic, religious and political motives that animated Polish anti-Semitism in the early modern period.  This book also identifies and elucidates significant factors in the history of their formations in East Central Europe, and in the history of the host-desecration charge in early modern Europe. Magda Teter is Professor of History, and the Jeremy Zwelling Professor of Jewish Studies. She currently serves as the Chair of the History Department.

Frozen

Wesleyan University Orchestra and Wesleyan Concert Choir present an evening of fun popular holiday classics!

Tchaikovsky, Four Dances from “The Nutcracker”
Leontovich, Carol of the Bells
Lopez, Orchestral Suite from “Frozen”
Anderson, The Christmas Festival

Includes announcement of the results of the audience vote on a large-scale composition for the May 2015 concert
AND
an audience sing-along!

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