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Reblogged from: Wesleyan Storytelling Project. (Go to the original post…)

[Jaron Argiz ’01, Aaron Frank ’01 & Claire Frank ’01] A clip from our interview with Jaron Argiz ’01, Aaron Frank ’01 and Claire Frank ’01.

The Storytelling Project returns with Jaron Argiz ’01Aaron Frank ’01 and Claire Frank ’01 in conversation. They remember a song that has stayed with them through their years of friendship.

Jaron: “People got to know as the duo—the rhyming Jaron and Aaron.”
Aaron: “…it was a brand—Jaron and Aaron… mostly it was because people wanted to say it. Not that they were that excited to see us.”

As students, Jaron and Aaron were active members of the a capella group, the New Group. Jaron studied Government and Spanish, and is a partner at ADR Media Integrators. Aaron studied sociology, and is a mental health counselor at an alternative school. Claire, who studied psychology, is now the director of the Speech & Language department at Park Terrace Care Center in New York.

Listen to the clip

Listen on your tablet or mobile device

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Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/storytelling-jaron-aaron-claire-01

Music: “Sleep Inside” by The Last Minutes—Ryan Rodger ’11, Ben Block ’11, Katherine McDonald ’11 and Bella Loggins ’10, and “Your Song” by Bella Loggins

#THISISWHY

Record a comment

Like an episode or clip? Have an idea for a story? Record a comment by calling (860) 685-3100.*

You can also write to wesconnect@wesleyan.edu with comments and suggestions, or leave a comment below.

* By leaving a message you are granting Wesleyan permission to use your recording on Wesleyan.edu, SoundCloud.com and social media sites as part of our promotion of the podcast. We may add your recorded message to an upcoming episode or clip.

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Storytelling Project. (Go to the original post…)

[Jaron Argiz ’01, Aaron Frank ’01 & Claire Frank ’01] A clip from our interview with Jaron Argiz ’01, Aaron Frank ’01 and Claire Frank ’01.

The Storytelling Project returns with Jaron Argiz ’01Aaron Frank ’01 and Claire Frank ’01 in conversation. They remember a song that has stayed with them through their years of friendship.

Jaron: “People got to know as the duo—the rhyming Jaron and Aaron.”
Aaron: “…it was a brand—Jaron and Aaron… mostly it was because people wanted to say it. Not that they were that excited to see us.”

As students, Jaron and Aaron were active members of the a capella group, the New Group. Jaron studied Government and Spanish, and is a partner at ADR Media Integrators. Aaron studied sociology, and is a mental health counselor at an alternative school. Claire, who studied psychology, is now the director of the Speech & Language department at Park Terrace Care Center in New York.

Listen to the clip

Listen on your tablet or mobile device

More stories

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/storytelling-jaron-aaron-claire-01

Music: “Sleep Inside” by The Last Minutes—Ryan Rodger ’11, Ben Block ’11, Katherine McDonald ’11 and Bella Loggins ’10, and “Your Song” by Bella Loggins

#THISISWHY

Record a comment

Like an episode or clip? Have an idea for a story? Record a comment by calling (860) 685-3100.*

You can also write to wesconnect@wesleyan.edu with comments and suggestions, or leave a comment below.

* By leaving a message you are granting Wesleyan permission to use your recording on Wesleyan.edu, SoundCloud.com and social media sites as part of our promotion of the podcast. We may add your recorded message to an upcoming episode or clip.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Alex Kurtzman '95]
By Caroline MacNeille ’16

Zak Penn ’90 and Alex Kurtzman ’95 have both been tasked with turning beloved stories into cinema. Alex Kurtzman, a producer and writer, will partner with Chris Morgan to lead Universal Studios’ revival of classic monster films.

The studio is embarking on a project to reboot its library of classic monster movies, with writer-producers Alex Kurtzman (of the “Star Trek” and “Amazing Spider-Man” franchises) and Chris Morgan (of the “Fast and Furious” series) spearheading the effort.

The new franchise will aim to breathe new life into such iconic characters as Frankenstein’s monster, Dracula, the Wolf Man, the Creature From the Black Lagoon, the Invisible Man, the Bride of Frankenstein and the Mummy. It will unite them in a shared mythology, similar to what Marvel and Disney have done with the blockbuster Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Kurtzman and Morgan will first tackle a reboot of “The Mummy,” which is slated for release April 22, 2016.

[Zak Penn '90]

Writer and director Zak Penn is working on a film adaptation of the bestselling sci-fi novel Ready Player One for Warner Bros.

Four years after winning a bidding war for Ernie Cline’s acclaimed sci-fi novel “Ready Player One,” Warner Bros. has hired comic book movie scribe Zak Penn to rewrite the script.

“Ready Player One” is a futuristic tale that follows teenager Wade Watts, who likes to escape the real world by logging into Oasis, a globally-networked virtual utopia where users lead idyllic alternate lives. When the game’s eccentric billionaire creator dies, he offers up his fortune as the prize in an elaborate treasure hunt. Wade is pitted against powerful corporate foes and ruthless competitors who’ll do anything, in the Oasis and the real world, to reach the treasure first and win control of the Oasis.

Penn, who has story credits on “The Avengers” and “X2,” previously wrote “The Incredible Hulk,” “X-Men: Last Stand” and “Elektra.” He also wrote, produced and directed the poker comedy “The Grand,” and most recently worked on the “Pacific Rim 2” script with Guillermo del Toro.

Read more about Alex Kurtzman ’95…

Read more about Zak Penn ’90…

Image 1: c/o Empire Online

Image 2: c/o Celebrity birthdays

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140728-penn-kurtzman

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[Twitter] follow @AlexKurtzman on Twitter ➞

Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

This week’s Throwback Thursday selection is “Prayer Rug,” from Agha Shalid Ali’s 1987 collection The Half-Inch Himalayas (also available in a special-edition minibook).

 

  ali blog

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Prayer Rug

Those intervals
between the day’s
five calls to prayer

the women of the house
pulling thick threads
through vegetables

rosaries of ginger
of rustling peppers
in autumn drying for winter

in those intervals this rug
part of Grandma’s dowry
folded

so the Devil’s shadow
would not desecrate
Mecca scarlet-woven

with minarets of gold
but then the sunset
call to prayer

the servants
their straw mats unrolled
praying or in the garden

in summer on grass
the children wanting
the prayers to end

the women’s foreheads
touching Abraham’s
silk stone of sacrifice

black stone descended
from Heaven
the pilgrims in white circling it

this year my grandmother
also a pilgrim
in Mecca she weeps

as the stone is unveiled
she weeps holding on
to the pillars

(for Begum Zafar Ali)

.

.
AGHA SHAHID ALI (1949-2001) was born in New Delhi. He earned a Ph. D. in English from Pennsylvania State University in 1984 and an M.F.A. from the University of Arizona in 1985. His other volumes of poetry include Rooms Are Never Finished (2001), The Country Without a Post Office (1997), The Beloved Witness: Selected Poems (1992), A Nostalgist’s Map of America (1991), A Walk Through the Yellow Pages (1987), In Memory of Begum Akhtar and Other Poems (1979), and Bone Sculpture (1972). He is also the author of T.S. Eliot as Editor (1986), translator of The Rebel’s Silhouette: Selected Poems by Faiz Ahmed Faiz (1992), and editor of Ravishing Disunities: Real Ghazals in English (Wesleyan, 2000). Ali Received fellowships from The Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, the Ingram-Merrill Foundation, the New York Foundation for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation and was awarded a Pushcart Prize. He held teaching positions at the University of Delhi, Penn State, SUNY Binghamton, Princeton University, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Hamilton College, Baruch College, University of Utah, and Warren Wilson College.

Reblogged from: ptully.blogs.wesleyan.edu. (Go to the original post…)

Welcome to Wesleyan University—or welcome back!  I’m Pat Tully, University Librarian.  Here is some basic information about library resources and services.  If you have other questions you’d like to see answered on this blog or answered privately, please email me at ptully@wesleyan.edu, or call me at 860-685-3887. 

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Q:  What libraries make up Wesleyan University Library?

Olin Liolinlibsmallbrary is the main campus library, located at 252 Church Street between Clark Hall and the Public Affairs Center (commonly known as the PAC).   It houses collections in the arts, humanities and social sciences, the Art Library, Scores & Recordings and the World Music Archives, and Special Collections & Archives.  The Reserve Desk/Office and Interlibrary Loan are also in Olin, as is the Office of the University Librarian.scili1st

The Science Library is in the Exley Science Center at 265 Church Street.  It houses collections in mathematics and the sciences, and materials on reserve for many science courses.  It also contains the DVD/video collections and compact storage on the ground floor with print science journals and older materials in all subject areas.   Melissa Behney is the Science Librarian.

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 Q:  How do I get to the library’s website?

Go to: http://wQR code for library catalogww.wesleyan.edu/library/.  The library’s website has links to information on our resources, services, facilities and systems. Library OneSearch allows you to do a single search to for links to information from most of the library’s catalogs and electronic resources.  Other questions? Go to the Library FAQ page.

To search the library catalog using your tablet or smartphone, use this QR code to access our mobile site.

 

Q:  How do I get material through interlibrary loan (ILL)?

To sign up for an ILL account, go to: https://wesleyan.hosts.atlas-sys.com/illiad/FirstTime.html  After filling out a brief form you will have an Illiad account and be able to submit online requests for material that is not locally accessible.

Q:  What is the CTW Consortium?CTWlogo

The CTW Consortium consists of Connecticut CollegeTrinity College, and Wesleyan University. The libraries share an online catalog and collaborate on a number of system and collection-related initiatives.  We also share our collections, and students and faculty can request materials from other libraries in the consortium, which are shipped in 1-2 business days.   To do a search in the CTW catalog, go to:  http://ctwsearch.wesleyan.edu/vufind/

If Connecticut or Trinity has an item and Wesleyan does not, you can request it by clicking on the Make a Request link in the catalog record for the item.

Q: How can I request that a book, journal or other resource be added to the library’s collection?

To request that the library acquire a book, journal subscription or other resource, contact the liaison for your department or program. You may also fill out the Request a Purchase form that is linked to the library web page.

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Q: What kinds of primary sources are available at Wesleyan?

class-visits-btnWesleyan’s Special Collections & Archives includes significant collections of rare books, manuscript collections, university archives, and local history materials. These collections are frequently used by faculty across the disciplines for academic research and as integral parts of their course curricula. SC&A’s website describes these holdings in more detail.  Director of Special Collections & Archives Suzy Taraba, University Archivist Leith Johnson, and the SC&A staff are happy to answer your questions and work with you and your students.  Contact them at sca@wesleyan.edu or call (860) 685-3864.

Q:  How do I put material on reserve for my class?

The library provides both print and electronic reserves.  For more information about how to put material on reserve for your class, go to the Academic Course Reserve page or contact EunJoo Lee, Head of Access Services (phone: 860-685-3454).

In the Science Library, you may put print materials on reserve for science and mathematics courses. For more information about putting print material on reserve in the Science Library, contact Mardi Hanson d’Alessandro (phone: 860-685-3328).

All electronic reserves, including those for mathematics and science courses, are processed by Olin Reserve—contact EunJoo Lee for more information.

Q:  How does the library teach students to find and use sources for papers and projects?

Students can sign up for a Personal Research Session (PRS for short) with a librarian, who will work with them to find appropriate resources for their assignment.  Online subject and research guides are also available with links to online resources specific to each discipline.   To arrange for a library instruction session for your class, or to explore creative ways to teach both course content and subject resources for research, contact the librarian liaison to your department or program.

Q: How do I get access to the library’s electronic resources from off-campus?

Current students, faculty and staff can get to most of the library’s electronic resources through the Wesleyan proxy server, by entering their Wesleyan email user name and password.

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Q: How can I add my publications to WesScholar?

scholarWesScholar is Wesleyan’s online archive of undergraduate honors theses, faculty publications, and other Wesleyan collections.  You may increase the visibility of your publications by adding them to WesScholar; for more information about doing so contact University Archivist Leith Johnson.

 

Q:  Where can I get a detailed list of library services and information for faculty?

You can go to the Wesleyan University Library Services for Faculty page, or contact the librarian liaison for your department.

Q: How can I keep up with library news—changes in hours, improved services, new resources, and library events and exhibits?cardinlib

WesLibNews is the library’s Twitter feed; we also have a Facebook page and a Library News blog.  Or you can contact us by calling 860-685-2660 or by sending an email: reference@wesleyan.edu.

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We look forward to working with you.  Best wishes for the coming year!

 

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Majora Carter '88]
By Cynthia Rockwell

Majora Carter ’88, an urban revitalization strategy consultant, real estate developer and Peabody Award winning broadcaster, recently founded Home(town) Security Laboratories, a nonprofit corporation that seeks transform low-income communities through local economic opportunities.

Carter also announced the corporation’s first project, StartUp Box #SouthBronxs (sbsq.org). Through a relationship with Game Developers, a local video game business, StartUp Box has arranged to drive their quality assurance testing, operating from a newly renovated facility in the Hunts Point section of the Bronx. Carter plans to hire employees from this neighborhood, training them to test games across multiple platforms and return error reports using industry protocols.

Says Carter, StartUp Box CEO, “Placing people in jobs within software companies is not always viable, especially for people with barriers to employment. StartUp Box uses the B2B outsourcing model that industry is comfortable with, and puts that economic activity in communities where it’s needed most.”

To highlight these opportunities, StartUpBox is hosting a grand opening block party on August 2 at their headquarters on 866 Hunts Point Ave. The celebration features a salsa show, kids’ activities, information on educational opportunities, and a video game tournament that will also serve as employee recruitment for StartUp Box.

As well as producing entry-level jobs for people whom the tech economy might otherwise leave behind, Carter notes that StartUp Box will also offer educational opportunities and mentoring in the community.

Image: from Southern Connecticut State University

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140724-majora-carter

Related links

[Facebook] Like Majora Carter on Facebook →

[Twitter] follow @MajoraCarter on Twitter →

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Majora Carter '88]
By Cynthia Rockwell

Majora Carter ’88, an urban revitalization strategy consultant, real estate developer and Peabody Award winning broadcaster, recently founded Home(town) Security Laboratories, a nonprofit corporation that seeks transform low-income communities through local economic opportunities.

Carter also announced the corporation’s first project, StartUp Box #SouthBronxs (sbsq.org). Through a relationship with Game Developers, a local video game business, StartUp Box has arranged to drive their quality assurance testing, operating from a newly renovated facility in the Hunts Point section of the Bronx. Carter plans to hire employees from this neighborhood, training them to test games across multiple platforms and return error reports using industry protocols.

Says Carter, StartUp Box CEO, “Placing people in jobs within software companies is not always viable, especially for people with barriers to employment. StartUp Box uses the B2B outsourcing model that industry is comfortable with, and puts that economic activity in communities where it’s needed most.”

To highlight these opportunities, StartUpBox is hosting a grand opening block party on August 2 at their headquarters on 866 Hunts Point Ave. The celebration features a salsa show, kids’ activities, information on educational opportunities, and a video game tournament that will also serve as employee recruitment for StartUp Box.

As well as producing entry-level jobs for people whom the tech economy might otherwise leave behind, Carter notes that StartUp Box will also offer educational opportunities and mentoring in the community.

Image: from Southern Connecticut State University

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140724-majora-carter

Related links

[Facebook] Like Majora Carter on Facebook →

[Twitter] follow @MajoraCarter on Twitter →

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Majora Carter '88]
By Cynthia Rockwell

Majora Carter ’88, an urban revitalization strategy consultant, real estate developer and Peabody Award winning broadcaster, recently founded Home(town) Security Laboratories, a nonprofit corporation that seeks transform low-income communities through local economic opportunities.

Carter also announced the corporation’s first project, StartUp Box #SouthBronxs (sbsq.org). Through a relationship with Game Developers, a local video game business, StartUp Box has arranged to drive their quality assurance testing, operating from a newly renovated facility in the Hunts Point section of the Bronx. Carter plans to hire employees from this neighborhood, training them to test games across multiple platforms and return error reports using industry protocols.

Says Carter, StartUp Box CEO, “Placing people in jobs within software companies is not always viable, especially for people with barriers to employment. StartUp Box uses the B2B outsourcing model that industry is comfortable with, and puts that economic activity in communities where it’s needed most.”

To highlight these opportunities, StartUpBox is hosting a grand opening block party on August 2 at their headquarters on 866 Hunts Point Ave. The celebration features a salsa show, kids’ activities, information on educational opportunities, and a video game tournament that will also serve as employee recruitment for StartUp Box.

As well as producing entry-level jobs for people whom the tech economy might otherwise leave behind, Carter notes that StartUp Box will also offer educational opportunities and mentoring in the community.

Image: from Southern Connecticut State University

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140724-majora-carter

Related links

[Facebook] Like Majora Carter on Facebook →

[Twitter] follow @MajoraCarter on Twitter →

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Jason Jacobs '98]
By Aditi Kini ’13

Runkeeper, launched in 2008, is one of the world’s most popular personal fitness apps. How did its cofounder and CEO Jason Jacobs ’98 manage to build it up? In an interview with the Boston Globe, Jason talks about some of the key moments in the ideation and development of the app – and why he’s not interested in anyone acquiring it.

1. Jacobs holds a liberal arts degree from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn., showing that you don’t have to be a techie to start a successful tech firm.

“I didn’t study a whole lot,” he said, “but when I did, American government was my major. I got out in the late ’90s, and I came to Boston and started working in small, high-growth technology. I’m not trained as an engineer. The plumbing of the Internet is very important but it’s not something that I could relate to a ton.”

2. Jacobs was a sales specialist, but he soon learned that in any tech company, it pays to speak geek.

“A big piece, honestly, is finding a great team that understands the things you don’t. So one of the first persons I started working with when I was getting going was someone who had been an engineer for his entire career. To this day, he’s our chief technology officer. We did the same thing in product, we did the same thing in user experience. Having a good core team of people who were the masters of their craft was an important success factor.”

Read more…

Image: c/o Jason Jacobs

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140723-jason-jacobs

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[Twitter] follow @jjacobs22 on Twitter ➞

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Aria Danaparamita '13]
By Aditi Kini ’13

In an interview with Wesconnect, Aria (Mita) Danaparamita ’13 talks about working on the documentary Dalip Singh Saund: His Life, His Legacy, studying postcolonial theory and the importance of immigrant history.

Dalip Singh Saund: His Life, His Legacy chronicles the life of the first Asian-American elected to U.S. Congress. The film has been screened at the Sikh Film Festival, Punjabi American Festival, MLK Jr. Memorial Library in DC, and, in a special screening for Members of Congress, at the Motion Picture Association of America, while the next step is to incorporate it into middle and high school curriculum in California. You can support the documentary here.

Aria, who was a Freeman Asian Scholar, majored in History and received University Honors, among other awards.

WESCONNECT: Could you tell us more about Dalip Singh Saund: His Life, His Legacy, your role in it, and its position in Asian-American dialogue?

ARIA DANAPARAMITA: Dalip Singh Saund: His Life, His Legacy is a short bio-documentary on the first Asian elected as a US Congressman. He came as a student from Punjab in 1920 and, despite social and institutionalized discrimination, represented California District 29. The film is part of a series, the Asian Pacific American Members of Congress History Project, which we produced in association with the US Capitol Historical Society and the Asian Pacific American Institute for Congressional Studies.

I was a senior researcher in the project, tasked with archival research. It’s embarrassingly nerdy that I got excited about this, but I spent most of my time at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC, scouring through Congressional Records, various legislations, while researching the broader historical contexts around immigration and civil rights in Saund’s era. We had a very small team so I also helped manage visual assets and edit the script.

[Dalip Singh Saund]

The documentary is the first to tell Saund’s story on screen. It seems obvious that he’s an important figure, being the first Asian American Congressman, yet so few people know his name. But his story is truly amazing. He came to study agriculture, graduated with a Mathematics PhD from UC Berkeley, but, unable to find a teaching job, relegated himself to farming. He then became a community leader and was among those who pushed for the Luce-Celler Act which was a groundbreaking legislation that first allowed Asians (Indians and Filipinos) to naturalize as US citizens. As a Congressman, he fought for water rights, public lands rights, gender equality, all the while never straying from his roots and his Sikh faith. The issues that Saund faced, the barriers that he overcame, these are issues that still resonate today. Anti-immigration sentiments, racial prejudice, and gender inequality are still prevalent. We hope the film serves as an educational tool and an inspiration that keeps Saund’s legacy alive.

WC: In the course of your research for Dalip Singh Saund… did you come across any surprising information?

ARIA: A lot, actually. One: when Saund was running for office, they relied on billboards. On all of them, it said “D.S. Saund.” He was never Dalip Singh Saund. Throughout his life, stories of “passing” like this one were fascinating to me.

[Dalip Singh Saund]

Two: due to the Immigration Act of 1917, Saund and other Asians were ineligible to naturalize as US citizens or otherwise obtain immigration status, until the passing of the Luce-Celler Act. Interestingly, if an American woman wanted to marry such a person, she would have had to give up her US citizenship as well—this was the case with Saund’s wife.

Then there’s an interesting piece of Congressional history: Saund was a proponent of the Equal Rights Amendment. He was among the Members of Congress who introduced the ERA during his terms. The ERA has been introduced in every Congressional session since 1923 until it withered away in 1982.

WC: This was your first project after graduation – how did you get involved in this film? How do you see this fitting in the future narrative of your career?

ARIA: I was a History major at Wesleyan. I met the writer and director, E. Samantha Cheng, at a documentary festival in Washington, D.C. Film has always been an interest of mine: I worked at the Wesleyan Film Series all of my four years at Wesleyan. It was also a historical documentary. I came to love archival research while writing my thesis at Wesleyan and I was excited to get back to the archives. The subject matter is also very resonant to me: I, like Saund, was an international student facing my own H1B work visa issues. And, of course, immigration history and race politics were important subjects for me at Wesleyan. Since the film wrapped up, I’ve been working on another project that documents mixed-race experiences in Washington DC. And, when I return to Asia, I hope to continue working on documentary projects—be it film, photography, or writing—that explore issues of immigration, race, and identity.

WC: You recently wrote an Op-Ed in The Jakarta Globe on the psychology, politics and the very nomenclature of “postcolonialism” in Indonesia. Could you summarize your take on the present-day relics of colonialism for us? How did post- or neocolonialism affect your academic interests and your intellectual growth?

I first encountered postcolonialism in an FYI COL course with Professor Typhaine Leservot. I continued to read and grapple with it in other courses—history, literature, archaeology—and it figured heavily into my thesis. I have been thinking a lot about it again in the context of contemporary Indonesia and the recent presidential election. I would certainly argue that relics of colonialism remain: Indonesia’s agriculture, natural resource industries, and the systems that maintain them were established during the Dutch colonial era, now transposed onto the global, capitalist structure. The actors have changed: the exploiters are no longer European colonists; they’re native and foreign businessmen, investors, and policy makers. But this exploitative structure remains, causing many Indonesians to still live as though in fear of a colonizing specter, while accepting their place as the low-skill laborer, the producer of raw materials, the not-quite-oppressed but disempowered nonetheless.

In a way, studying postcolonial theory was my own way of dissecting my identity and history. This is also why I disagree with much of the postcolonial theory canon that portrays a binary, however fluid, of the oppressor and the silent oppressed. I’d like to think that tacit acceptance of one’s role in the (post)colonial scheme doesn’t mean one is silent or silenced, but its own mode of struggle to self-actualize. I’d like to further study postcolonial theory in graduate school and apply it to contemporary issues.

WC: Any memories of Wesleyan that stand out?

Many and, naturally, they’re contradictory. Only a year out, I still look at how amazing Wesleyan was for me: my friends, my professors, West African drumming courses, Joss Whedon’s ’87 commencement speech, getting Lemony Snicket’s (Daniel Handler ’92) autograph. But, as any member of the class of 2013 would probably attest, our later years were fraught with issues surrounding need blind admissions, the rights of our custodians, the racial problems that incited the diversity fora.

I’ve come to take Wesleyan as a place where criticism can flourish, even if such criticism went unaddressed by the administration. The task is how to keep that passion alive as we all carve our professional and academic paths onward.

Learn more…

Image (1): c/o Aria Danaparamita

Images (2, 3): c/o Eric Saund, via the South Asian American Digital Archive/SAADA

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140723-aria-danaparamita

#THISISWHY

Related links

[Facebook]Dalip Singh Saund: His Life, His Legacy on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @mitatweets on Twitter ➞

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