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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Caroline MacNeille ’16

The Bad Kids, directed by Keith Fulton and Lou Pepe, and edited by Jacob Britta ’93, recently won the Documentary Special Jury Prize for Vérité Filmmaking at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival. The film focuses on the “bad kids” of Black Rock Continuation High School, an impoverished community in the Mojave Desert. The school is specifically for students at-risk of dropping out.

The film follows Black Rock’s principal, Vonda Viland as she coaches three at-risk students for one academic year. Her approach is unique, and there are only two rules: the curriculum moves at each student’s own pace and there is no detention. She shows her students compassion, acknowledging that their circumstances are often dire and make school work seem insignificant. 

Variety writes: “The Bad Kids details triumphs and failures with a clear, empathetic eye that’s attuned to the many forces working against these teens and the administrators tasked with helping them achieve their degrees… This Sundance-premiering documentary’s sobering portrait of adolescents on the edge of self-ruination, and of heroic adults doing their best to save them, should have considerable appeal to discerning theatrical and television outlets.”

The documentary tells its story largely through cinéma vérité, meaning cinematic truth. There are few interviews or voice overs, the filmmakers craft their story through the footage alone. Jacob Bricca ’93 served as the film’s editor, taking on the challenging task of crafting a narrative with no narration.

In 2014 Jacob released Tanaka, an autobiographical documentary about growing up with two activist parents. He has also taught in the College of Film and the Moving Image at Wesleyan. He currently lives and works in Tucson, Arizona. 

Read more…

Image: c/o Wesleyan University

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20160210-jacob-bricca

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[Twitter] follow @JacobBricca on Twitter ➞

[Twitter] follow @BadKidsMovie on Twitter ➞

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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Caroline MacNeille ’16

The Bad Kids, directed by Keith Fulton and Lou Pepe, and edited by Jacob Britta ’93, recently won the Documentary Special Jury Prize for Vérité Filmmaking at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival. The film focuses on the “bad kids” of Black Rock Continuation High School, an impoverished community in the Mojave Desert. The school is specifically for students at-risk of dropping out.

The film follows Black Rock’s principal, Vonda Viland as she coaches three at-risk students for one academic year. Her approach is unique, and there are only two rules: the curriculum moves at each student’s own pace and there is no detention. She shows her students compassion, acknowledging that their circumstances are often dire and make school work seem insignificant. 

Variety writes: “The Bad Kids details triumphs and failures with a clear, empathetic eye that’s attuned to the many forces working against these teens and the administrators tasked with helping them achieve their degrees… This Sundance-premiering documentary’s sobering portrait of adolescents on the edge of self-ruination, and of heroic adults doing their best to save them, should have considerable appeal to discerning theatrical and television outlets.”

The documentary tells its story largely through cinéma vérité, meaning cinematic truth. There are few interviews or voice overs, the filmmakers craft their story through the footage alone. Jacob Bricca ’93 served as the film’s editor, taking on the challenging task of crafting a narrative with no narration.

In 2014 Jacob released Tanaka, an autobiographical documentary about growing up with two activist parents. He has also taught in the College of Film and the Moving Image at Wesleyan. He currently lives and works in Tucson, Arizona. 

Read more…

Image: c/o Wesleyan University

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20160210-jacob-bricca

Related links

[Twitter] follow @JacobBricca on Twitter ➞

[Twitter] follow @BadKidsMovie on Twitter ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Class of 2016. (Go to the original post…)

The Career Center and Disability Resources are cosponsoring a workshop on Disability Disclosure in the Job Search Process this Friday, February 12th, at noon in 41 Wyllys, room 114. We will discuss the why, when, what and to whom to disclose your disability in your job search process and examine situations that current Wesleyan students and alum have shared with us. We look forward to a lively, interactive discussion!

Paulina Bren

Lecturer in the Multidisciplinary Programs at Vassar College

In 1955, an enormous statue of Stalin was unveiled in Prague; in 1956, following Khrushchev’s “secret speech,” Stalin went from hero to villain; in 1961, Prague’s Stalin was obliterated with 1600 pounds of explosives. Paulina Bren will discuss what came next: the story of the vast plinth that thereafter remained empty, and the uncharted territory of the 1970s and 1980s in the Eastern Bloc, a period of history known as late communism.

Bren is the author of the award-winning book, The Greengrocer and His TV: The Culture of Communism after the Prague Spring, and a Wesleyan and COL alumna.

Wednesday, February 24, 2016
PAC 001
4:15pm

Sponsored by the History Department

Event Contact: History Professor Victoria Smolkin-Rothrock at vsmolkin@wesleyan.edu.

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

The Peter Morgenstern-Clarren ’03 Social Justice Award was created in memory of Peter Morgenstern-Clarren who pursued social justice while a student at Wesleyan.  His activism included securing benefits for Wesleyan custodial staff, participating in the United Student and Labor Action Committee, and contributing his leadership to the campus chapter of Amnesty International.  We are grateful to Dr. Hadley Morgenstern-Clarren and The Honorable Pat Morgenstern-Clarren for their generosity in sponsoring this award that honors their son’s activism for the public good.  A committee will select the sophomore or junior who best embodies the pursuit of social justice.  The application process is described below. Any sophomore or junior in good standing may submit an essay that addresses the following:

Describe in detail the most influential social justice effort in which you played a leadership role that sought to make our local and global communities more equitable (The effort should have a direct affect on the Wesleyan campus and/or on external communities.);

  1. Explain your level of involvement in the work for example: your role in raising awareness about a particular issue on campus, coordinating events, implementing programming and campaigns in the pursuit of social justice;
  2. In addition to your essay, you must include a letter of support from a faculty or administrator involved in your effort and submit evidence of impact that the social justice effort had on making our society more just by contributing testimonies from individuals (excluding family and friends) directly involved, artifacts from your social justice effort (e.g., past printed programs, presentations, and articles), and/or your work from courses. You may include non-print items, such as DVDs.

You must include at least four copies of the non-print and printed items and drop them off to Antonio Farias, North College, 3rd floor, Room 317 by 5 p.m. on Tuesday, March 1, 2016.  All essays, letters of support and printed items must be in by the deadline.  By submitting your packet, you agree to allow the Office of Equity & Inclusion to use it (or excerpts from it) for assessment, archival, and promotion purposes. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact Antonio Farias x4771, afarias@wesleyan.edu

Previous recipients:

2015: Hannah Sokoloff-Rubin class of 2016 &       Work and Leadership in the Wesleyan Doula Project

Claire Wright, class of 2016                        Sexual Assault Prevention & Survivor Support

2014: Hailey Sowden, class of 2015                     Middletown Food Project/Long Lane Farm

2013: Joshua Krugman, class of 2014                  Long Lane Organic Farm

2012: Corey Guilmette, class of 2013                  Wesleyan Committee for Investor  Responsibility

2011: Ali Chaudry, class of 2012                         Pakistan Flood Relief Initiative

2010: Allegra Stout, class of 2012                        Disability Issues

2009: Lily Mandlin, class of 2010                        Facilitator, North End Action Team Teen Dreams Society

2008: Mu Abeledo, class of 2009                         Founder, Middletown Youth Radio Project (MYRP)

2007: Lashawn Springer, class of 2008                 Program Organizer, “Common Struggle for Freedom & Justice”

 

2016 Peter Morgenstern-Clarren ’03 EMPLOYEE RECOGNITION AWARD 

Nominations are now being accepted for the Peter Morgenstern-Clarren ’03 Employee Recognition Award. Eligible Wesleyan employees include custodians, dining staff, grounds crew, and building maintenance staff (i.e. electricians, plumbers). The award is to honor and thank the people whose every day work helps the students at Wesleyan. Nominators may only submit one person for consideration; you are welcome to nominate yourself. The winner will receive a cash award of $1,500.

The Peter Morgenstern-Clarren ’03 Employee Recognition Award was created in memory of Peter Morgenstern-Clarren, who pursued social justice as a student at Wesleyan.  His activism included securing benefits for Wesleyan custodial staff, participating in the United Student and Labor Action Coalition, and contributing his leadership to the campus chapter of Amnesty International.  We are grateful to Dr. Hadley Morgenstern-Clarren and The Honorable Pat Morgenstern-Clarren for their generosity in sponsoring this award that honors their son’s activism for the public good.

To apply, please respond to the following questions in no more than two pages:

1)     What is your (the employee’s) job at Wesleyan? In what ways do you (the employee) engage and interact with Wesleyan students on campus?

2)     In what ways have you (the employee) contributed to student life at Wesleyan? If possible, please give specific examples.

3)     What do you (the employee) find most rewarding about working on campus?

4)     Is there anything else that you would like to tell the committee about yourself (the employee)?

Submit nominations to Antonio Farias at North College, 3rd floor, room 317, call 860.685.4771 or email afarias@wesleyan.edu by 5pm, Tuesday, March 1, 2016.

Previous recipients

2015: David Csere       2014: Lucia Valenzuela      2013: David Wright      2012: Jose Rodriguez

2011: Gloria Tobon      2010: Mollie Lane      2009: Ron Bowman & Wendy Norton

Selection Committee for both awards:  Joseph Matthew Brown ’03; Richard Culliton; Assistant Vice President/Dean of Students; Antonio Farias, Chair & Vice President for Equity & Inclusion; Derek Vincent Garcia, ’04; Sara Morgenstern; Mogenstern-Clarren, Family Representative, Bulaong Ramiz; Assistant Director, Student Activities & Leadership Development, Ann Wightman, Professor of History and Latin American Studies.

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

The Career Center and Disability Resources are cosponsoring a workshop on Disability Disclosure in the Job Search Process this Friday, February 12th, at noon in 41 Wyllys, room 114. We will discuss the why, when, what and to whom to disclose your disability in your job search process and examine situations that current Wesleyan students and alum have shared with us. We look forward to a lively, interactive discussion!

Reblogged from: Class of 2016. (Go to the original post…)

Healing Forward: Self-Care for Survivors of Sexual Violence

Screen Shot 2016-02-08 at 3.13.25 PM

This group addresses the unique ways that a traumatic experience can impact self-care. Topics include:

self-compassion, sleep hygiene, sex and sexuality, body image, creativity and play, mindfulness, and building healthy relationships

Sessions will include art, movement and other activities.

Email Alysha B. Warren, LPC, Therapist/Sexual Violence Resource Coordinator to sign up for the group.

The deadline to sign up is Thursday, 2.11 at 5pm.

Reference “Healing Forward” in the subject line of the email.

Reblogged from: Class of 2016. (Go to the original post…)

To:   Candidates for Bachelor of Arts Degree
From:  Rosie Villard, Administrative Assistant V

To ensure that your full legal name is spelled correctly on your diploma, we are asking you to confirm your diploma name.  Please confirm your name as soon as possible.

In your portfolio under Enrollment Status click on Diploma Names.  The name that we currently have on file will be displayed on this page.  If your name is correct, please click on Confirm/Update button at the bottom of the page.  If your name is not correct, please make any necessary corrections before selecting the Confirm/Update button.

Please note that you will only be able to update your name once per day – if you confirm your name in error, you will need to return to the page the following day to make any corrections.

If your name contains special characters or accents, please confirm the spelling of your name without the characters or accents.  In order to make sure that the special characters or accents appear correctly on your diploma, you will be asked to link to the Special Character Diploma Name Confirmation form and send it to the Registrar’s Office.

To make a correction to your legal name for all other university records, you will need to bring a form of legal identification (birth certificate, passport, driver’s license, or legal name change document if your name has been legally changed) to the Registrar’s Office.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

 

Register for the Global Health & Innovation Conference
by February 10 for a reduced registration rate.

The Global Health & Innovation Conference at Yale on April 16-17, 2016, is the world’s leading and largest global health conference as well as the largest social entrepreneurship conference, with 2,200 professionals and students from all 50 states and more than 55 countries. This must-attend, thought-leading conference convenes leaders, changemakers, professionals and students from all sectors of global health, international development, and social entrepreneurship.

   

Social Impact Pitch Abstracts For Oral Presentation: The Social Impact Lab is an opportunity to present an idea, program, or organization to the audience and to an expert panel for mentoring, guidance, and advice. Pitch abstracts are accepted for oral presentation, and February 11 is the final application deadline.

Unite For Sight is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit global health delivery organization that is free of commercial interests and committed to promoting high-quality care for all. The Global Health & Innovation Conference is presented annually by Unite For Sight.

 

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Learn from 250 speakers. Keynote addresses include Ned Breslin, Jeffrey Sachs, and Sonia Ehrlich Sachs. See the confirmed 2016 conference speakers.

Apply to present at the Global Health & Innovation Conference! January 20 is the next Social Impact Pitch and Innovation Prize application deadline. Read more about the presentation opportunities and the abstract submission process.

The GHIC Innovation Prize is a $10,000 and a $2,000 cash prize that is awarded to the two best social impact pitches that are presented at the 2016 Global Health & Innovation Conference.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

edmhannahportraitwrDear Wesleyan Community Friends,

In my new position as VP of Strategic Partnerships, The Breaking News Network and Producer / Director CLMT News Network, we are in beta stage of our 60 city social media / local news Climate Change News Network – I am looking for volunteers that love social media, are warm and sociable, and have an interest in massively amplifying news about climate change problems and solutions and meeting and mingling with key newsmakers, media, advocates, business people and others in this space (think renewables, sequestration, adaptation, climate justice, energy efficiency, climate policy, etc.). This is a virtual position so anyone responsible and focused can do this from anywhere (though we focus our efforts during U.S. waking hours). 

Desired commitment is at least 1 hour a day, preferably in 15 minute bursts plus approximately 5 hours a week in addition to that. I will personally mentor the volunteers with an eye to helping them develop their skills and future career prospects. I provide excellent recommendations for strong contributors and am proud to have helped many past volunteers get jobs, scholarships, and into the graduate programs of their choice. 

These are not required but extra credit for anyone with the following: an active Twitter account, who knows how to use Slack, with past work on online or offline campaigns, good diplomacy / communications skills, journalism / strong writing skills, any experience writing clever slogans or headlines, and those that think outside the box. Persons of all backgrounds and ages encouraged, if you feel any hesitation or concern that we might not be welcoming in relation to your background, race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, outrageous past or what have you, please forget about it and contact us anyway.  

To apply, please email Hannah@WordOutConsulting.com with a short paragraph about why you are interested, when you can start and names and phone numbers of two references (anyone, including friends who can attest that you are a responsible person who follows through with their commitments).  

Hannah Doress
VP of Strategic Partnerships, The Breaking News Network and Producer / Director CLMT News Network
Co-Director, Shore Up Marin: a coalition focused on sea level rise, flooding and emergency preparedness and social equity
Principal, Hannah Doress Events/Word Out Consulting

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