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Reblogged from: ENGAGE – Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Ever seen a cool, interactive map that presents a lot of information really clearly, and wondered how someone created it? It was likely created using GIS, and students in Professor Kim Diver’s Introduction to GIS course (E&ES 324) learned how to create maps like those and much more during their course work this fall.

GIS stands for a geographic information system, and is simply a system that organizes, analyzes, and presents geographical or geospatial data. In Intro to GIS, students collaborate with a community partner to create a GIS and conduct data analysis and visualization related to the community partner’s objectives. The principle aim of the project is for students to gain applied GIS skills, while also working on a meaningful project for a local community partner.

Story map for the project on Long Lane Farm

Story map for the project on Long Lane Farm

All together, 17 undergraduate students worked on five different projects for community partners like the Middlesex Land Trust, the Moodus Reservoir Preservation Group, Long Lane Farm, and two separate projects with the City of Middletown. One master’s student also worked on a project related to her thesis concentration, without a community partnership, as part of the requirements for her master’s coursework in E&ES.

What kind of work were these students able to accomplish during one semester? For example, the group working with the Middlesex Land Trust was interested in analyzing the Sumner Brook Corridor, which runs through Middletown, Durham, and Haddam, and identifying properties that could be purchased and protected by the Land Trust. They used a weighted system of five different criteria to identify and map the most promising parcels of land for their community partner as sites to be preserved.

Throughout the presentations of the students’ final projects on Thursday, there was a strong vibe in the room that the students had fun. While their work may have been tedious or difficult at times, they enjoyed developing relationships and working with their community partners, learned a lot about GIS and its many applications, and truly liked the work they were doing. The community partners who attended the presentations also had grins from ear to ear while watching their students present — it was clear the work they put in was meaningful for the community partner, and that it was a mutually beneficial collaboration.

Louisa Winchell and Mat Shelley-Reade returning the box of 1922 aerial photographs used for their project to Roger Palmer (City of Middletown).

Louisa Winchell and Mat Shelley-Reade returning the box of 1922 aerial photographs used for their project to Roger Palmer (City of Middletown).

As an observer, I was impressed by the amount of skill these students had in GIS after one semester of introductory course work. Their presentations were clean, succinct and informative, and used some great tools to showcase their findings. For example, one group who worked on a project for the City of Middletown used a “spyglass” feature to overlay photos of 1920s Middletown over a map of Middletown today. As you scrolled across the map, you could see a snapshot of what Middletown looked like almost a century ago in contrast to its geographical features today.

Knowledge of the basics of GIS can be helpful on a variety of different projects across disciplines, and this course is a great way to learn those basics while also producing meaningful work for organizations in our community. Professor Diver is offering an Advanced GIS and Spatial Analyses course (E&ES334) this spring and plans to teach this introductory course again next fall. Congratulations to the students in the course on their wonderful final presentations!

*The Hartford Courant also wrote a story about the two City of Middletown projects.

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)

Public Safety Officer Simon Bostick raises the American flag at half staff Dec. 7 in Honor of National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day. On Dec. 7, 1941, more than 2,400 U.S. citizens were killed in the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. “A lot of innocent people lost their lives that day,” Bostick said. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)

Christina Othon, assistant professor of physics, assistant professor of integrative sciences at Wesleyan University met with students enrolled in the Green Street Teaching and Learning Center‘s Discovery AfterSchool Program on Dec. 1. Othon and Wesleyan students taught the AfterSchool attendees about physics through hands-on activities.

GSTLC s a community-based studio that develops, applies, and disseminates best practices in experiential teaching and learning which enhance Wesleyan and the greater community. The Discovery AfterSchool Programs offers a range of classes in the arts, sciences and math for children in Grades 1- 5.

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)

The Worlds of Dance Concert, held Dec. 4 at Crowell Concert Hall, featured the works of five different dance courses in their semester-end culminating performance. Beginning and intermediate dance students performed works in various styles including Bharata Natyam (South Indian classical dance). The classes were taught by Pedro Alejandro, associate professor of dance; Susan Lourie, adjunct professor of dance; Hari Krishnan, associate professor of dance; and Katja Kolcio, associate professor of dance.

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)

The Center for the Arts hosted a West African Drumming and Dance Concert Dec. 2 at Crowell Concert Hall. The performance featured master drummer Emmanuel Attah Poku; choreographer and artist-in-residence Iddi Saaka; and more than 90 Wesleyan students. In addition, the Kiniwe African Dance Ensemble from Tufts University also performed at the concert. The event showcased the vibrancy of West African cultures through their music and dance forms. 

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

You are invited to a screening of an Oscar longlisted Ukrainian feature documentary ‘Ukrainian Sheriffs’. Film director Roman Bondarchuk and producer Darya Averchenko will present the film and will be available for Q&A after the screening.  It is a very special film that is currently getting the best reviews in top American film media.

Tuesday, December 6, 7:30pm       Powell Family Cinema

College of Film and the Moving Image

FREE

The screening is co-sponsored by College of Film and the Moving Image with, Office of the Dean of Arts and Humanities, Department of Russian and Eastern European Studies, The Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life, The Department of Government, and Wesleyan’s Center for the Arts.

“Ukrainian Sheriffs” got the Special Jury Prize in the main competition of IDFA – 2015 (A+). The International documentary film festival in Amsterdam well-known as central documentary world forum and called ‘documentary Cannes’.  The festival record of the movie is great: it was screened at more than 40 festivals from South Korea to Toronto and continues to travel worldwide. TV-premier was on ZDF/ARTE, on Saturday prime-time, in March 2016. ARTE has coverage of 120,000,000 viewers in total.

Ukrainian Sheriffs is a real life story about two local sheriffs and the villagers of a remote village near Crimea, Stara Zburievka. Following the sheriffs on their everyday duties, the story gives us a look beyond the war and the ongoing political events inside the everyday life of the villagers, foregrounding the tension between personal survival and political justice. What was meant to be a film about a few people from the Ukrainian countryside and their everyday struggles, portrays the faith of a whole nation during the turning period in its history.

Here you’ll find trailer of the movie

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u81rnJG6ym4

Following this links you’ll find news about the movie and interview with film-director Roman Bondarchuk:

http://www.screendaily.com/reviews/ukrainian-sheriffs-review/5097445.article?blocktitle=REVIEWS&contentID=40296

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/ukrainian-sheriffs-idfa-review-846198

http://www.filmkommentaren.dk/blog/blogpost/3406/

http://www.vimooz.com/2016/09/10/ukrainian-sheriffs-ukraine-2017-oscars/

 

Reblogged from: Green Street Blog. (Go to the original post…)

Jessica Torres is a Middlesex Community College student completing a Human Services internship here at Green Street this semester as a teaching assistant in our Discovery AfterSchool Program. She will be making several blog posts and reflections during her time here for an inside look at our AfterSchool classes.

Working with Ms. Renee

By: Jessica Torres

miss. renee class

Over my two months volunteering at Green Street, I really enjoy the Beads, Baubles, Boxes, and Beans class with Ms. Renee. The kids always have so much fun doing the projects she designs. We have decorated masks, jewelry boxes, pumpkins, bookmarks, and more.

Spending one day a week in this class, I have noticed Ms. Renee’s passion for and dedication to her instruction and most of all, to the students. She makes every class exciting for the students and knows just how to keep their attention. She knows how to bring the class from more rowdy state to a nice and calm level when needed.

One technique I have noticed that she uses to redirect a student when they are having a hard time is to nicely tell them it is time to be quiet and pay attention to the instructions. She says it in a funny high pitched voice though and that makes the students laugh yet lets them know that they need to listen at that moment. I admire this approach because it shows that you can use a positive, humorous approach to help students get focused or redirected.

I also admire how Ms. Renee is very open minded and always willing to listen when a student is very upset about how their project came out. The student will point out all the negative things they see with their finished product but Ms. Renee points out all the unique things she sees. This always seems to make the child feel a lot better and helps them to see the good in their situation. Art is unique and the students all get to show that in their own ways with Ms. Renee’s guided techniques and positive approach.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Mary Halvorson ‘02]Guitarist Mary Halvorson ‘02 was recently featured on NPR Music News, during a segment that discusses her unconventional and distinctive musical style. One of few young women to lead a jazz band, she is a celebrated and in-demand musician of improvised music.

She studied jazz studies in her time at Wesleyan, an experience that was crucial to her journey as a practicing musician:

Halvorson discovered the electric guitar when she was 11, growing up in Brookline, Massachusetts. But she went to college at Wesleyan University in Connecticut planning to be a biologist. Then she walked into a music class taught by Anthony Braxton, the MacArthur “genius” grant-winning composer and saxophonist.

“And I was just so bowled over by him and his music that I ended up dropping all the science classes within the first semester,” she says. “Within my first year, I thought, ‘I can’t not do this.'”

Halvorson released her latest album, a collection of octets titled Away With You, in late October of this year. Looking ahead, she expresses excitement about the steady growth of women in jazz and the new voices popping up in what is typically heralded as a masculine genre. She aims to encourage these voices:

Halvorson says her philosophy as a leader is to give musicians the freedom to make their own choice, in much the same way that she found her own voice on the guitar.

“For me it’s more a matter of just trusting my instincts, even if you have a really simple idea — just, ‘OK, I like this, I’m gonna play’ — and not worrying too much about what it is, what it sounds like, or doesn’t sound like,” she says. So I try as much as I can to play what I like, and trust what I like.”

Read more…

Image: By Peter Gannushkin

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20161203-mary-halvorson

Related links

[Facebook]Like Mary Halvorson on Facebook ➞

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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Mary Halvorson ‘02]Guitarist Mary Halvorson ‘02 was recently featured on NPR Music News, during a segment that discusses her unconventional and distinctive musical style. One of few young women to lead a jazz band, she is a celebrated and in-demand musician of improvised music.

She studied jazz studies in her time at Wesleyan, an experience that was crucial to her journey as a practicing musician:

Halvorson discovered the electric guitar when she was 11, growing up in Brookline, Massachusetts. But she went to college at Wesleyan University in Connecticut planning to be a biologist. Then she walked into a music class taught by Anthony Braxton, the MacArthur “genius” grant-winning composer and saxophonist.

“And I was just so bowled over by him and his music that I ended up dropping all the science classes within the first semester,” she says. “Within my first year, I thought, ‘I can’t not do this.'”

Halvorson released her latest album, a collection of octets titled Away With You, in late October of this year. Looking ahead, she expresses excitement about the steady growth of women in jazz and the new voices popping up in what is typically heralded as a masculine genre. She aims to encourage these voices:

Halvorson says her philosophy as a leader is to give musicians the freedom to make their own choice, in much the same way that she found her own voice on the guitar.

“For me it’s more a matter of just trusting my instincts, even if you have a really simple idea — just, ‘OK, I like this, I’m gonna play’ — and not worrying too much about what it is, what it sounds like, or doesn’t sound like,” she says. So I try as much as I can to play what I like, and trust what I like.”

Read more…

Image: By Peter Gannushkin

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20161203-mary-halvorson

Related links

[Facebook]Like Mary Halvorson on Facebook ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

We write to invite you to cast your vote for the best photos featured in our “Wes in the World” exhibit, currently on display in our Center for Global Studies (Fisk Hall).  This exhibit consists of photographs submitted by Wesleyan students who studied abroad this past year.

Prizes will be announced Jan 27, 4:30-6:00pm, at our awards ceremony.  By voting, you will secure for yourself a special invitation to the ceremony, and a chance to meet award-winning photographers!

We encourage you to visit the Center for Global Studies, in Fisk Hall, to see the photographs on display.  In any case, by clicking on the link below, you will be able to view digital versions of these works of student art and cast your ballot.

Don’t delay, vote today! We look forward to receiving your vote and to seeing you on January 27, if not before.

Sincerely, Antonio González, Director of Global Studies and Kia Lor, Assistant Director of Language and Intercultural Learning

PhotoContest2

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