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Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

We write to invite you to cast your vote for the best photos featured in our “Wes in the World” exhibit, currently on display in our Center for Global Studies (Fisk Hall).  This exhibit consists of photographs submitted by Wesleyan students who studied abroad this past year.

Prizes will be announced Jan 27, 4:30-6:00pm, at our awards ceremony.  By voting, you will secure for yourself a special invitation to the ceremony, and a chance to meet award-winning photographers!

We encourage you to visit the Center for Global Studies, in Fisk Hall, to see the photographs on display.  In any case, by clicking on the link below, you will be able to view digital versions of these works of student art and cast your ballot.

Don’t delay, vote today! We look forward to receiving your vote and to seeing you on January 27, if not before.

Sincerely, Antonio González, Director of Global Studies and Kia Lor, Assistant Director of Language and Intercultural Learning

PhotoContest2

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

New Teaching Evaluations Update

Wesleyan is implementing a new teaching evaluation form this fall.  The majority of classes will use the new teaching evaluation form, with new questions.  However, a small number of classes will continue to use the old form for a few more terms, so some students will complete a different form for certain classes.  There will be one landing page for all student course evaluations, with a link to the correct form for each course.

Sheryl Culotta, Associate Provost, Academic Affairs

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Rachel Verner ’15] Rachel Verner ’15 and Katy Thompson ’15 are working to normalize consent with their apparel and education start-up, Let’s Be Clear.

Wesconnect caught up with Rachel, the company’s founder, to promote its Kickstarter campaign and discuss the work their team is doing to change the culture of sexual violence, on campuses and off.

WESCONNECT: Let’s Be Clear has a mission to challenge sexual violence by reframing the conversation about consent. Why is it so important to focus less on negative, reactionary measures and more on normalizing positive consent in these discussions?

RACHEL VERNER: At Let’s Be Clear, we place such a strong focus on talking about and teaching consent in a positive way because of our grounding in social psychology. In order to create change, we believe that we need to construct conversations in such a way that everyone feels welcome. We need to have conversations that people are excited about participating in. We need to re-frame complex issues in a way that makes sense, regardless of how much knowledge you have. And we want to provide people with solutions that they can implement in their daily lives.

WC: How is Let’s Be Clear using apparel as a medium to propel this cultural shift and promote healthier sexual relationships? What kind of slogans do you incorporate?

RV: We’re using apparel to lower the barrier of entry into conversations about consent and sexual violence prevention. A lot of people aren’t comfortable talking about consent, so having something like a t-shirt that can help initiate dialogue can be really helpful. Plus, having messages about consent on a t-shirt helps increase others exposure to the idea that consent is important – and the more we’re exposed to any given message, the more likely we are to incorporate that message into our ideology.

We have 5 different shirt designs, each with a slightly different style and message. Some examples are “I’m the boss of these parts”, “Stand with Survivors” and “Coercion is not Consent”. Our goal was to create a collection that really celebrates the individuality of consent, and moving forward, we hope to continue to do that.

WC: What kind of educational workshops are you hoping to make available this year, and who do these programs target?

RV: We’re offering three different programs in the new year – “How to go on a better date”, “How to have better sex” and “How to mix” (which looks at hook-up culture, consent and alcohol consumption). The concepts for these workshops came from some of the most common themes around and questions about consent – What does consent look like outside the context of sex? How do I get consent while having sex without killing the mood? What about having sex when you’re drinking – can you ask for or give consent? Our goal was to frame the answers to these questions in a way that’s really relatable. We’re trying to build workshops that attract a wide audience. I’ve spoken with a lot of people who said they didn’t feel like they had a place in workshops about consent because they weren’t a survivor, or they didn’t want to make anyone uncomfortable, or they didn’t know enough about consent to contribute. Our hope is that, by teaching consent through a different lens, we’ll be able to break down all those barriers and get more people talking and learning. Who doesn’t want to go on a better date? Or have better sex?

We’ll be offering these workshops to various organizations – colleges, high schools, parent groups, local activist organizations, sports teams, and so on.

WC: In what ways do you see conscious apparel and sexual education efforts as working together to create a safer sexual culture? How did you decide to combine these approaches in your initiative?

RV: Education is necessary to build a solid foundation for any kind of social change. The tricky part, though, is that in addition to education, you really need to find a way to permeate the culture with new messaging. For us, clothing was the perfect way to do that. We know apparel can be used as a medium for change. Our clothing choices impact both what we think and what other people think about us. And by displaying messages about consent so publicly, we can shift the way that people think about sex and build a culture where consent is the norm.

Back this project on Kickstarter…

Image: c/o Let’s Be Clear

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20161202-rachel-verner

#THISISWHY

Related links

[Facebook]Like Let’s Be Clear on Facebook ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Rachel Verner on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Rachel Verner ’15] Rachel Verner ’15 and Katy Thompson ’15 are working to normalize consent with their apparel and education start-up, Let’s Be Clear.

Wesconnect caught up with Rachel, the company’s founder, to promote its Kickstarter campaign and discuss the work their team is doing to change the culture of sexual violence, on campuses and off.

WESCONNECT: Let’s Be Clear has a mission to challenge sexual violence by reframing the conversation about consent. Why is it so important to focus less on negative, reactionary measures and more on normalizing positive consent in these discussions?

RACHEL VERNER: At Let’s Be Clear, we place such a strong focus on talking about and teaching consent in a positive way because of our grounding in social psychology. In order to create change, we believe that we need to construct conversations in such a way that everyone feels welcome. We need to have conversations that people are excited about participating in. We need to re-frame complex issues in a way that makes sense, regardless of how much knowledge you have. And we want to provide people with solutions that they can implement in their daily lives.

WC: How is Let’s Be Clear using apparel as a medium to propel this cultural shift and promote healthier sexual relationships? What kind of slogans do you incorporate?

RV: We’re using apparel to lower the barrier of entry into conversations about consent and sexual violence prevention. A lot of people aren’t comfortable talking about consent, so having something like a t-shirt that can help initiate dialogue can be really helpful. Plus, having messages about consent on a t-shirt helps increase others exposure to the idea that consent is important – and the more we’re exposed to any given message, the more likely we are to incorporate that message into our ideology.

We have 5 different shirt designs, each with a slightly different style and message. Some examples are “I’m the boss of these parts”, “Stand with Survivors” and “Coercion is not Consent”. Our goal was to create a collection that really celebrates the individuality of consent, and moving forward, we hope to continue to do that.

WC: What kind of educational workshops are you hoping to make available this year, and who do these programs target?

RV: We’re offering three different programs in the new year – “How to go on a better date”, “How to have better sex” and “How to mix” (which looks at hook-up culture, consent and alcohol consumption). The concepts for these workshops came from some of the most common themes around and questions about consent – What does consent look like outside the context of sex? How do I get consent while having sex without killing the mood? What about having sex when you’re drinking – can you ask for or give consent? Our goal was to frame the answers to these questions in a way that’s really relatable. We’re trying to build workshops that attract a wide audience. I’ve spoken with a lot of people who said they didn’t feel like they had a place in workshops about consent because they weren’t a survivor, or they didn’t want to make anyone uncomfortable, or they didn’t know enough about consent to contribute. Our hope is that, by teaching consent through a different lens, we’ll be able to break down all those barriers and get more people talking and learning. Who doesn’t want to go on a better date? Or have better sex?

We’ll be offering these workshops to various organizations – colleges, high schools, parent groups, local activist organizations, sports teams, and so on.

WC: In what ways do you see conscious apparel and sexual education efforts as working together to create a safer sexual culture? How did you decide to combine these approaches in your initiative?

RV: Education is necessary to build a solid foundation for any kind of social change. The tricky part, though, is that in addition to education, you really need to find a way to permeate the culture with new messaging. For us, clothing was the perfect way to do that. We know apparel can be used as a medium for change. Our clothing choices impact both what we think and what other people think about us. And by displaying messages about consent so publicly, we can shift the way that people think about sex and build a culture where consent is the norm.

Back this project on Kickstarter…

Image: c/o Let’s Be Clear

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20161202-rachel-verner

#THISISWHY

Related links

[Facebook]Like Let’s Be Clear on Facebook ➞

[LinkedIn] connect with Rachel Verner on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Media Project. (Go to the original post…)

On December 4 & 5 the Wesleyan Media Project and Department of Government are co-hosting a 2016 post-election conference featuring more than 20 prominent political scientists, non-partisan experts and PBS NewsHour Correspondent John Yang ’80.

Details on the panels and topics are below. The conference is open to the public, but there will be limited seating, so please arrive a little early for any panel you wish to attend.

A panels are in Allbritton Hall, Rm 311

1

Sunday, December 4

8:00 PM – 9:30 PM
An Overview of the 2016 Election

The opening session will review what happened in voting/the polls, advertising/campaigning and what it was like to cover the campaign from a journalism perspective.

Brian Schaffner, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Sarah Bryner, Center for Responsive Politics
Michael Franz (WMP Co-Director), Bowdoin College
John Yang, PBS NewsHour

1

Monday, December 5

9:00 AM – 10:20 AM
Panel 1: Media, Voting & Public Opinion

Panelists will discuss how media coverage played a role in the Trump victory, how factual corrections work (or don’t) in the Trump era, how mobile is shifting news consumption, and how anti-immigrant rhetoric affects public support for voter ID policies.

• Moderator: Travis Ridout (WMP Co-Director), Washington State University
Danny Hayes, George Washington University
Johanna Dunaway, Texas A&M
Brendan Nyhan, Dartmouth College
Adriano Udani, University of Missouri-St. Louis

1

10:35 AM – 12:10 PM
Panel 2: Political Psychology – Gender, Racism & Emotions

Panelists will discuss the role of gender and feminism, how moral words shape emotional responses, explicit racism and efforts to combat it, how authoritarianism operates and how anger and anxiety shape intolerance in the 2016 election and beyond.

• Moderator: Yamil Velez, Wesleyan University
Keena Lipsitz, Queens College CUNY
Matthew MacWilliams, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Leonie Huddy, Stony Brook University
Antoine Banks, University of Maryland, College Park
Kathleen Searles, Louisiana State University

1

1:20 PM – 2:40 PM
Panel 3: Campaign Finance, Special Interests & Outside Influence

Panelists will discuss what we know about spending and dark money in federal races this election cycle, whether money mattered, and how voting patterns spill over into consumer decisions and corporate/brand loyalty.

• Moderator: Erika Franklin Fowler (WMP Co-Director), Wesleyan University
Robert Maguire, Center for Responsive Politics
Ciara Torres-Spelliscy, Stetson University
Douglas Spencer, University of Connecticut
Jennifer Nicoll Victor, George Mason University

1

2:50 PM – 4:10 PM
Panel 4: Governing After the Election

Panelists will discuss what impact the results of the 2016 election are likely to have on our institutions and governing.

• Moderator: Logan Dancey, Wesleyan University
Paul Collins, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Kathryn L. Pearson, University of Minnesota
Frances Lee, University of Maryland

 

Reblogged from: ENGAGE – Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Eunice Lee ’19 attended the 2016 Net Impact Conference this November in Philadelphia. The following is her recap of the weekend:

 

With the help from PCSE, I attended the Net Impact Conference 2016 in Philadelphia, PA from November 3 to November 5.

Picture1Net Impact is a non-profit organization that connects students and professionals who are interested in using business skills to make social changes. They provide their members with the skills and experiences necessary to make the greatest impact.

I participated in this conference as part of the Net Impact’s Healthy Food Fellowship Program, which supports undergraduate and graduate students in the U.S. to initiate campus projects that raise awareness on inequalities in access to healthy food.

Throughout the 3-day conference, I connected with various professionals, CEOs, graduate and undergraduate students.  Although I initially felt nervous to be surrounded by many professionals and MBA students, as the conference progressed, I felt more confident and comfortable in networking. In fact, since most of the participants were graduate students and professionals, I realized that this was a privilege to experience this great networking opportunity as a second-year undergraduate student.

Picture1On the first day of the conference, I participated in an off-site tour to the
Campbell’s Soup Head Quarter in Camden, NJ. We were given a tour of how their products are developed, from determining the current food trend to packaging the products. Our main purpose of this tour was to meet with the Soulfull Project team – a new public benefit company started by Campbell’s employees who had left their roles to create this company.

 

Picture2The Soulfull Project is grounded on a mission to equalize access to wholesome and nourishing food. For every serving of their breakfast cereal, the Soulfull donates a serving of the same cereal to local food banks. Hearing their philosophy made me appreciate that there are entrepreneurs who truly believe in equal access to nutritious food and are willing to put their own jobs at stake to put their belief into practices.

Each day of the conference began and ended with amazing keynote speakers – to name a few, the co-founder of Black Lives Matter Alicia Garza, CEO of Etsy Chad Dickerson, and the special assistant of the President for My Brother Keeper at the White House Michael Smith.

Of all the great keynote speakers, the one that particularly stood out to me was Meika Hollender. She is the co-founder of Sustain Natural company – a first brand of all natural female-focused sexual wellness product.

Meika Hollender, co-founder of Sustain Natural

Meika Hollender, co-founder of Sustain Natural

She said that before developing her company, she had learned two important facts from the condom market in the U.S. First, that women are the main purchasers of condoms. Second, that most condoms include an ingredient that becomes toxic when in contact with human’s skin. These two were the main reasons that motivated her to start Sustain Natural. I was very inspired by her approach to target women and her determination to launch this product as the means to empower women to take control of their sexual health, despite the shaming she had received from the public.

On the last day of the conference, the Healthy Food Fellow cohorts had our first gathering. I was able connect with other fellows who share the same passion in food justice and hear their campus project plans. I was also very fortunate to make a connection with our fellowship coordinator Rebecca Wolfe, who is also the senior director of Net Impact. Before her current position, she had various experiences in the arts and projects that fought poverty in underserved communities. Since arts and health inequality in underserved communities have always been my main interests, Rebecca was the perfect person to connect with. In fact, after the conference, I was able to have a phone call with Rebecca to hear about her career path and how her experience and passion in the arts have actually become the main vehicle to develop action projects to make social changes.

The Healthy Food Fellow cohort

The Healthy Food Fellow cohort

Overall, the Net Impact Conference was truly an inspiring experience that shifted my view of the forms of social changes and an empowering opportunity to realize the power we all possess to spark movements. I’m very excited to apply the skills and ideas that I gained at this conference for my Healthy Food Fellowship project in spring semester. 

I would like to give a special thank you to the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship (PCSE) for providing the financial assistance and for supporting my Healthy Food project. 

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Genevieve Angelson ’08]Actress Genevieve Angelson ’08 is currently starring in her first leading television role on Amazon’s Good Girls Revolt.

The new television series is set in 1969 New York and follows a group of women working at a magazine as they challenge sexism in the newsroom. The story is adapted from a book of the same name, written by Lynn Povich, and is based on real-life events. Angelson plays Patti Robinson, a young and vibrant researcher at News of the Week magazine.

After performing on Broadway and starring in Showtime’s House of Lies, Angelson began to train for this career-changing, leading part:

To prepare for the role, the film studies major rewatched Love Story and other ’70s movies. “It was all about looking for how I might have lived in my body in that era,” she says, adding that she could rely on the expertise of former journalists on set for the newsroom aspect.

The show was released on October 28, 2016 on Amazon Video. Watch the trailer below:

Read more…

Image: c/o Elle

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20161128-genevieve-angelson

Related links

[Facebook]Like Genevieve Angelson on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @GenevieveAngel on Twitter ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Genevieve Angelson ’08]Actress Genevieve Angelson ’08 is currently starring in her first leading television role on Amazon’s Good Girls Revolt.

The new television series is set in 1969 New York and follows a group of women working at a magazine as they challenge sexism in the newsroom. The story is adapted from a book of the same name, written by Lynn Povich, and is based on real-life events. Angelson plays Patti Robinson, a young and vibrant researcher at News of the Week magazine.

After performing on Broadway and starring in Showtime’s House of Lies, Angelson began to train for this career-changing, leading part:

To prepare for the role, the film studies major rewatched Love Story and other ’70s movies. “It was all about looking for how I might have lived in my body in that era,” she says, adding that she could rely on the expertise of former journalists on set for the newsroom aspect.

The show was released on October 28, 2016 on Amazon Video. Watch the trailer below:

Read more…

Image: c/o Elle

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20161128-genevieve-angelson

Related links

[Facebook]Like Genevieve Angelson on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @GenevieveAngel on Twitter ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: African Studies News @ Wesleyan. (Go to the original post…)

Lunch Talk: The Jewish Community of Madagascar

By Elysha Netsarh

Tuesday, November 29, 12 Noon, @ USDAN 108

Lunch is provided.

Elysha Netsarh Flyer

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Anna Roberts-Gevalt ’06] Anna Roberts-Gevalt ’06 is part of the folk duo Anna & Elizabeth with her collaborator, ballad singer Elizabeth Laprelle. The two consider themselves historians and storytellers as well as musicians, and they aim to illustrate the stories that accompany their songs.

Singing and playing traditional music that has either been passed down to them by elders or gathered from archives, ethnography plays hugely into their art. Their performances have thus relied on telling stories with the visual aid of a scrolling picture show, moving panorama, or what is commonly known in this context as a “crankie.”

This tool helps to illustrate the old songs they sing. Roberts-Gevalt recounts first being introduced to a crankie while she was a student at Wesleyan University:

“It was so amazing. And then when I was finishing up at Wesleyan I got the costume designer lady to let me do an independent study for a credit called, like, ‘Visual Interpretations of Ballads,’ ” Roberts-Gevalt told me recently. “And then it just kind of sat in my closet for a couple years, before I met Elizabeth.”

In her conception, this apparatus helps to express what is lost when folk music is taken out of its traditional setting and put onstage:

“We’re basically taking this music out of context and presenting it. I think that’s totally OK to do. You can put it in a new context and that can be really exciting. But part of what I think the players are drawn to is the context. Part of what I loved about folk music at the beginning was, ‘Wow, here’s the type of music that people play for fun, with their friends, with their parents and grandparents.’ It’s a way of being, a social thing.”

Anna & Elizabeth are currently on tour in the United States, Canada and the UK through May 2017. Check out their tour stops here.

Read more…

Image: c/o Cowan Creek Mountain Music School

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20161125-anna-gevalt-roberts

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[Facebook]Like Anna & Elizabeth on Facebook ➞

[Twitter] follow @aecrankies on Twitter ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

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