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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Evvie Allison ’11] Dancer and choreographer Evvie Allison ’11 has been awarded a Fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) in Choreography. The organization makes unrestricted cash grants of $7,000 to New York State artists working in 15 disciplines, awarding five per year on a triennial basis. Only 4% of applicants receive this award!

NYFA Executive Director Michael L. Royce spoke on the award recipients for 2016:

“This year’s Fellows range from 26 to 80 years in age, reflecting NYFA’s endeavor to support artists during all walks of life and encourage them in their creative careers to concentrate on what they do best: create art and inspire all of us in the process. We are grateful for the leadership support of the New York State Council on the Arts and our other funders, which enables us to continuously contribute to the thriving New York State arts scene by supporting its most essential member, the artist.”

Evvie Allison recently finished up a residency with Chez Bushwick. Her newest work includes a collaboration with the Arthur Moon Band as the choreographer for their music video, “Wind Up.” She also teamed up with dance artist Alice MacDonald earlier this summer to host Free Advice, a co-mentorship event that encourages transparency and sharing as ways to empower dance practitioners and makers.

Read more…

Image: By Alex Escalante

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20150729-evvie-allison

#THISISWHY

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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Evvie Allison ’11] Dancer and choreographer Evvie Allison ’11 has been awarded a Fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) in Choreography. The organization makes unrestricted cash grants of $7,000 to New York State artists working in 15 disciplines, awarding five per year on a triennial basis. Only 4% of applicants receive this award!

NYFA Executive Director Michael L. Royce spoke on the award recipients for 2016:

“This year’s Fellows range from 26 to 80 years in age, reflecting NYFA’s endeavor to support artists during all walks of life and encourage them in their creative careers to concentrate on what they do best: create art and inspire all of us in the process. We are grateful for the leadership support of the New York State Council on the Arts and our other funders, which enables us to continuously contribute to the thriving New York State arts scene by supporting its most essential member, the artist.”

Evvie Allison recently finished up a residency with Chez Bushwick. Her newest work includes a collaboration with the Arthur Moon Band as the choreographer for their music video, “Wind Up.” She also teamed up with dance artist Alice MacDonald earlier this summer to host Free Advice, a co-mentorship event that encourages transparency and sharing as ways to empower dance practitioners and makers.

Read more…

Image: By Alex Escalante

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20150729-evvie-allison

#THISISWHY

Related links

[Facebook]Add Evvie Allison on Facebook ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

Gerald Vizenor has been welcomed by Birchbark Books for a reading from his new book Treaty Shirts: October 2034—A Familiar Treatise on the White Earth Nation. The reading will be held at Bockley Gallery (near Birchbark Books in Minneapolis) on Tuesday, August 9th at 7pm.

Vizenor-Treaty-R-72-3Birchbark Books is owned and operated by New York Times bestselling and National Book Award winning author, Louise Erdrich (Ojibwe). As a store that prides itself in their belief in “the power of good writing, the beauty of handmade art, [and] the strength of Native culture,” they are the perfect partner to Vizenor’s Treaty Shirts. In this masterful, candid, surreal, and satirical allegory set in an imagined future, seven natives are exiled from federal sectors that have replaced the federal reservation system. Banished because of their dedication to a democratic ethos, they declare a new, egalitarian nation on an island in Lake of the Woods—a lake bordering Ontario and Minnesota.

Gerald Vizenor is a prolific novelist, poet, literary critic, and citizen of the White Earth Nation of the Anishinaabeg in Minnesota. One reader described Treaty Shirts as feeling “utterly like Ojibwe poetry [or dream song] in prose form.” Vizenor as long been known for his uncanny ability to transfer the power of traditional storytelling to the written word. He will be signing books following the reading.

Vizenor_Gerald 2015GERALD VIZENOR is a prolific novelist, poet, literary critic, and citizen of the White Earth Nation of the Anishinaabeg in Minnesota. He is Professor Emeritus of American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. His novels Shrouds of White Earth and Griever: An American Monkey King in China won the American Book Award; Griever also received the New York Fiction Collective Award. He is currently working on the sequel to Blue Ravens, an engrossing historical portrayal of Native American soldiers in World War I.

Vizenor’s novels Blue Ravens and Favor of Crows are availabe in paperback now!

Visit our Gerald Vizenor’s companion website.

Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

It is my sad task to inform you that Jelle Zeilinga de Boer, Wesleyan University Press author and Harold T. Stearns Professor of Earth Science, emeritus, passed away last Saturday, a month before his 82nd birthday.

Jelle Zeilinga de Boer, photo by Bill Burkhart.

Jelle Zeilinga de Boer, photo by Bill Burkhart.

Jelle received his BS and PhD from the University of Utrecht before coming to Wesleyan as a postdoctoral fellow in 1963. During his early years at Wesleyan he worked closely with Geology Professor Jim Balsley in the field of paleomagnetism. In 1977 Jelle was named the George I. Seney Professor of Geology and in 1984 he was named the Harold T. Stearns Professor of Earth Sciences.

In the 1970s Jelle worked as a joint professor at the University of Rhode Island at the Marine Sciences Institute where he was a PhD supervisor for Bob Ballard, who found the Titanic in 1985. Ballard later invited Jelle to go diving in the submersible Alvin to collect rocks in the Cayman Trough.

Jelle was the author of four books, Volcanoes in Human History (with D.T. Sanders), Earthquakes in Human History, Stories in Stone (2009), and New Haven’s Sentinels (2013)—the latter two published by Wesleyan University Press.

Originally interested in coming to the United States to study the Appalachian Mountains, Jelle’s research focused on the geotectonics of the Appalachians, Southeast Asia, and South and Central America.

In 2015 Jelle received the Joe Webb Peoples Award, presented annually by the Geological Society of Connecticut to someone who has contributed to the field of geology in Connecticut. Wesleyan’s current Harold T. Stearns Professor of Earth Science Joop Varekamp, Jelle’s friend and colleague, was quoted by The Wesleyan Argus at the time of this award: “[De Boer] was an outstanding teacher, who received the Binswanger prize for excellence in teaching roughly a decade ago. His classes were very well-liked by many, and he taught many intro science classes until the day that he retired. [His] great talents were in drawing in students to the field of E&ES, making people enthusiastic about Geology, and his field trips on the Geology of Connecticut aroused interest among students who never thought that they would be interested in science.”

Jelle is survived by his wife, Felicité, his son, Bjorn, daughters Byrthe and Babette, their spouses, and his four grandchildren, Cheyne, Indiana, Braedon and Marino.

The funeral services will be private. A memorial event will be planned for the fall.

Reblogged from: Green Street Blog. (Go to the original post…)

Chenoa “Dakota” Summer was a Middlesex Community College intern last semester and we asked her to share some of her experience with us. It has been wonderful watching her grow and learn more about working with kids in our Discovery AfterSchool Program. Here is her final guest blog.

If you’re interested in signing your child up for Discovery AfterSchool classes, our fall semester registration is open and we have many fun classes in art, math, and science. Classes start the week of September 12, 2016. Call us to set up an appointment or fill out the application materials online and send in to us.

Looking At Myself After Green Street

The first day I started at Green Street, I was out of my element. There was usual commotion that came from being the first day of the semester and also a half day schedule. However, I felt a bit terrified in this new environment and I went home that first day exhausted and overwhelmed. I remember thinking that this might not be the right kind of internship for me. I even went to my advisor to express my doubts. She told me to stick with it for a few weeks and to talk about how I was feeling with my supervisors and the staff. If it still was not the right fit, we would work something else out. Luckily, after that first day, and the first week, things improved and I took away three important lessons.

One, I quickly learned that I distanced myself from the kids because I didn’t know how to work with them. I would stand on the perimeter in class and think that the kids hated me because they didn’t want to listen to what I had to say. It wasn’t until later when I realized the reason that they didn’t take me seriously was because I wasn’t on their level physically and wasn’t participating with them. Once I starting participating with them in class they grew to see me as a friendly authority figure. To maintain that respect, I found that being consistent but also kind and good-humored was very important in working with children.

Two, I learned that I have a lot more endurance than I thought I did. At the end of the first week, I was completely exhausted. As the weeks progressed, I would still be tired by the end of the week but I would give all I had each day and it paid off. Despite juggling five classes and the internship, I was still taking initiative and would follow up with my supervisors if I had questions or concerns. In fact, I learned a lot about the kids from asking my supervisors how to address behavior and also how to reach them better.

And three, the last thing I learned was how quickly I could grow despite being at this internship for only a matter of weeks. This growth was more apparent to those around me then it was to myself until the end of the semester. This was evident when I was presented with the award of “Most Valuable Player of the Green Street AfterSchool Staff.” To my utter surprise, every single kid in the room clapped for me, even the ones who I thought didn’t like me much. And it wasn’t just any regular old clap; it was an extended round of applause! This specific moment, among others, at Green Street’s Discovery AfterSchool Program will always stick with me.

Reblogged from: Center for Jewish Studies Blog. (Go to the original post…)

Wesleyan University Israel and Jewish Studies grant recipient student, Joy Feinberg ’19, along with Jamie Marvin ’19 and Sarah McCully ’16  and  their professor Kate Birney, assistant professor of classical studies, archaeology and art history and CJST faculty member, contributed to  the groundbreaking discovery of the first Philistine cemetery during their excavation in Ashkelon in Israel. The Philistines are known as the archenemy of ancient Israel from the Hebrew Bible and the discovery of the first Philistine cemetery might support the claim that the Philistines were migrants who arrived to the shores of ancient Israel from to lands to the West around the 12th century BCE.

To learn more about this discovery, please check the following link:

newsletter.blogs.wesleyan.edu/tag/kate-birney/

 

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Marshall Brozost ‘89] Real estate lawyer Marshall Brozost ‘89 has joined Orrick as a partner and will serve as head of the firm’s New York Real Estate Practice Group. A press release from the company notes his demonstrated exceptionality in the field.

Michael McAndrews, head of Orrick’s Global Real Estate Practice Group, spoke highly of Brozost joining the team:

“We are delighted Marshall is joining us. He is recognized as a leading practitioner in New York representing the precise types of real estate private equity and other clients we represent across the firm’s other offices. Marshall’s practice and skills align perfectly with our strategy, and he adds substantial depth to our team.”

Marshall was previously a partner at Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP. He currently serves on the Board of Directors of business development companies PennantPark Investment Corporation and PennantPark Floating Rate Capital Ltd. (NASDAQ). He earned a BA from Wesleyan University and a JD from New York University School of Law.

Read more…

Image: c/o Legal 500

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20150722-marshall-brozost

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Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Keren Alshanetsky ’17

[Marshall Brozost ‘89] Real estate lawyer Marshall Brozost ‘89 has joined Orrick as a partner and will serve as head of the firm’s New York Real Estate Practice Group. A press release from the company notes his demonstrated exceptionality in the field.

Michael McAndrews, head of Orrick’s Global Real Estate Practice Group, spoke highly of Brozost joining the team:

“We are delighted Marshall is joining us. He is recognized as a leading practitioner in New York representing the precise types of real estate private equity and other clients we represent across the firm’s other offices. Marshall’s practice and skills align perfectly with our strategy, and he adds substantial depth to our team.”

Marshall was previously a partner at Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP. He currently serves on the Board of Directors of business development companies PennantPark Investment Corporation and PennantPark Floating Rate Capital Ltd. (NASDAQ). He earned a BA from Wesleyan University and a JD from New York University School of Law.

Read more…

Image: c/o Legal 500

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20150722-marshall-brozost

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[LinkedIn] connect with Marshall Brozost on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

The ENGAGE blog (engage.wesleyan.edu) is the home of civic engagement activity at Wesleyan University. On the blog, you can subscribe to the weekly ENGAGE newsletter, which contains information about upcoming events, funding, internships and volunteer opportunities, and other content related to civic engagement and social entrepreneurship. You can also follow Engage on Facebook (Engage at the Allbritton Center) and on Twitter (@Wes_engage).

 

Reblogged from: The WesPress Blog. (Go to the original post…)

The Listening Habits of U.S. Troops in Iraq and Afghanistan

A study of music in the everyday lives of U.S. troops and combat veterans.

“A gifted interviewer, Lisa Gilman goes beyond stereotypes of the wounded American soldier by painting a complex and nuanced emotional portrait of contemporary soldiers’ lives, ones which the media rarely allow us to see and hear.”
—Jonathan Ritter, coeditor of Music in the Post-9/11 World

A study of music in the everyday lives of U.S. troops and combat veterans.

During the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, technological developments in music listening enabled troops to carry vast amounts of music with them, and allowed them to easily acquire new music. Digital music files allow for easy sharing, with fellow troops as well as with friends and loved ones far away. This ethnographic study examines U.S. troops’ musical-listening habits during and after war, and the accompanying fear, domination, violence, isolation, pain, and loss that troops experienced. My Music, My War is a moving ethnographic account of what war was like for those most intimately involved. It shows how individuals survive in the messy webs of conflicting thoughts and emotions that are intricately part of the moment-to-moment and day-to-day phenomenon of war, and the pervasive memories in its aftermath. It gives fresh insight into musical listening as it relates to social dynamics, gender, community formation, memory, trauma, and politics.

Visit our Spotify page for a related playlist: play.spotify.com/user/wesleyanup

gilman mymusicmywar

Lisa Gilman is an associate professor in the Department of English and Folklore Program at the University of Oregon. She is the author of The Dance of Politics: Performance, Gender, and Democratization in Malawi and director of the film Grounds for Resistance: Stories of War, Sacrifice, and Good Coffee. Her articles have appeared in Folklore, Popular Music, and Journal of American Folklore.

 

My Music, My War makes an original contribution to current studies on music and war, with its nuanced discussion of how music listening is used to define, and at times resist, gendered norms and rhetorics of hyper-masculinity, as well as the complex roles that music plays in veterans’ reintegration into civilian life.”  —Kip Pegley, coeditor of Music, Politics, and Violence

 

Music Culture Series

April

240 pp., 6 x 9”

Unjacketed Cloth, $80.00 x

978-0-8195-7599-9

 

Paper, $26.95

978-0-8195-7600-2

 

eBook, $21.99 Y

978-0-8195-7601-9

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