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Apps for Success

Reblogged from: peer advisor. (Go to the original post…)

We all know that iPhones are magical, wondrous devices useful for everything from snapchatting to getting the name of that song playing in Pi. Until this week though, I did not fully realize how much iPhones can help out with studying and time management. So, I come to this blog post to impart some wisdom about handy apps that can unlock the power of your iPhone…

1.    inClass

This free app allows you to organize your schedule, with both a semester and daily calendar. It also helps you organize your notes within your courses and your daily schedule, record audio while taking notes, and share notes with others.  So, your notes are organized for you within your courses and your daily schedule. This app is especially useful for students with learning disabilities.

 

Screen shot 2014-04-18 at 3.42.08 PM

 

 

2.    Noteability

This App, designed for an iPad and iPhone, isn’t free but it may just be worth the whopping $2.99. Noteability allows you to type notes directly into your phone and then replay your notes with audio recording that reads your notes back to you. You can also automatically backup all of your work to Dropbox, Google Drive, etc. Plus, it looks pretty awesome.

 

Screen shot 2014-04-18 at 5.21.50 PM

 

 

3.    myHomework

This free iPhone app is helpful in keeping track of all of your cousework, tests, and projects. It will notify you when an assignment coming up, and you can see all of your homework entries using the calendar view. It’s much harder to lose track of deadlines with this app at hand!

Screen shot 2014-04-18 at 5.26.10 PM

 

 

4.    My Minutes

Do you ever find yourself browsing Facebook or BuzzFeed for an inordinate amount of time? This $2.99 app is based on the power of goal setting and keeping track of that time. You can set this app to allow you to spend “at most” 15 minutes on, say, checking your email, and will then give you a nudge when you’re out of time. Conversely, you can see how much time it takes you to do your coursework for certain classes, which will help you to realistically manage your time and set goals in the future.

Screen shot 2014-04-18 at 5.32.49 PM

 

For a longer list of these apps, including ones specifically designed for college students with disabilities, see this fantastic page from the University of New Hampshire.

Reblogged from: classof2017. (Go to the original post…)

thumbnailDear students,

Elections for WSA President, WSA Vice President, and Senior Class Officers will close today, Friday, April 18, 2014 at 11:59:59PM.  Please vote immediately at wsa.wesleyan.edu/voting if you have not already done so.

The winners of these elections will claim to represent the interests of the Wesleyan student body or a significant segment of it, whether or not you vote.  Therefore, it is crucial that you vote so that your voice accounted for. Administrators, outsiders, and fellow students will take the words of these students to represent the views of the student body as a whole.  These representatives will have critical direct and indirect input on everything from the handling of the sexual assault issue to need-blind admissions to SBC allocations.  If you care about pretty much any student issue, you should vote.

Please note that you can vote in these elections even if you are studying abroad or a current senior (Class of 2014).

Have a wonderful weekend,
Elections Committee for Presidential and Senior Class Officer Elections

P.S.  Want to have direct input on these issues yourself? Join the WSA.  Petitions for the Spring At Large Election will go out on Monday. Look out for an email for more information!

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

From our busy friends at Unite for Sight:uniteforsight

On Thursday, April 24, 4-5pm Eastern Time, Unite For Sight’s Global Health University will host a “Tools for Responsible Engagement” webinar.  The webinar will include guidance and advice from five panelists, as well as ample opportunity to ask the speakers questions about responsible global engagement for students and professionals.  Learn about the complexities of international work, the critical aspects of cultural competency and respecting local communities and professionals, and ethical considerations of participating abroad.  This webinar is ideal for students and professionals interested in global health, as well as university advisors and faculty.

Registration: Attendance at the free webinar on April 24th requires advanced registration by April 22nd. Please RSVP athttp://slate.uniteforsight.org/register/globalengagement, and you will thereafter receive participation instructions by email, as well as an opportunity to submit your questions for the panelists.

The expert webinar panelists include:

  • Ned Breslin, CEO, Water For People
  • Michael Fairbanks, Fellow, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University
  • Tricia Morente, COO, Kangu
  • Natacha Poggio, Assistant Professor, Visual Communication Design, Hartford Art School, University of Hartford; Founder, Design Global Change
  • Aron Rose, Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Yale University School of Medicine; Associate Clinical Professor, Graduate Entry Prespecialty in Nursing, Yale University School of Nursing

Reblogged from: Class of 2016. (Go to the original post…)

Come see the amazing founder of the Wesleyan American Studies Department–Richard Slotkin–in action, THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 4:15, POWELL FAMILY CINEMA, fabulous Italian cookies to follow.  Professor Slotkin was a member of the English Department, began the American Studies Department (when he was in his mid-twenties), and helped establish the Film Department, and was one of Wesleyan’s most popular and beloved teachers (the first professor to win Wesleyan’s Binswanger Teaching Award twice).  He has not only written history, he has made it.  Since his early thirties he has been internationally acclaimed as one of the greatest American Studies scholars and he played a foundational role in developing the analysis of empire and race in the field of American Studies.  He taught hundreds of students each year in his movie courses on “Westerns” and also on war movies.  In December he was interviewed about gun control on Bill Moyers’ PBS show and before that has been interviewed by the major networks on gun culture and movies (for instance, re-reading the Star Wars films as extensions of the “frontier myth”).  He retired in 2008 and has not lectured at Wesleyan for undergraduates since then.  So this is a really special treat!

Reblogged from: classof2017. (Go to the original post…)

Come see the amazing founder of the Wesleyan American Studies Department–Richard Slotkin–in action, THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 4:15, POWELL FAMILY CINEMA, fabulous Italian cookies to follow (see the poster below).  Professor Slotkin was a member of the English Department, began the American Studies Department (when he was in his mid-twenties), and helped establish the Film Department, and was one of Wesleyan’s most popular and beloved teachers (the first professor to win Wesleyan’s Binswanger Teaching Award twice).  He has not only written history, he has made it.  Since his early thirties he has been internationally acclaimed as one of the greatest American Studies scholars and he played a foundational role in developing the analysis of empire and race in the field of American Studies.  He taught hundreds of students each year in his movie courses on “Westerns” and also on war movies.  In December he was interviewed about gun control on Bill Moyers’ PBS show and before that has been interviewed by the major networks on gun culture and movies (for instance, re-reading the Star Wars films as extensions of the “frontier myth”).  He retired in 2008 and has not lectured at Wesleyan for undergraduates since then.  So this is a really special treat! 

Best, Professor Pfister, Chair, American Studies Department

 

 

Reblogged from: The Wesleyan Writing Blog. (Go to the original post…)

When: Tuesday, April 22nd, 4:30 p.m.Where: PAC 001

Although the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars constitute two of the longest wars in American history, American literature from these wars is only now beginning to flourish. Novels such as Kevin Powers’ The Yellow Birds and Phil Klay’s Redeployment are slowly beginning to enter literary consciousness, but war literature from this dark period is still an underwritten and understudied genre. Next Tuesday, Wesleyan will host a panel which will hopefully mitigate that situation. Called “War Stories: Reading and Writing the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars,” the panel will feature three writers and commentators who have all written on some facet of the war experience. Lt. Col. Peter Molin is a professor of English at West Point who comments on the war experience on his blog, Acolytes of War. Joydeep Roy-Bhattacharya is a novelist whose latest book, The Watch, Publisher’s Weekly compared to the works of Joseph Heller and Tim O’Brien. Finally, Roy Scranton is co-editor of Fire and Forget: Short Stories from the Long War, which E.L. Doctorow praised as “searing stories from the war zones of Afghanistan, Iraq, and the USA by warrior writers. Fire and Forget is about not forgetting. It is a necessary collection, necessary to write, necessary to read.” Please join us on Tuesday for what should be a stimulating and informative discussion.

This event is sponsored by the History Department with the support of the Dean of Division II and the co-sponsorship of the Departments of English, Government, and American Studies, the College of Social Studies, and the Writing Programs.

Sammy Rosh has been a writing tutor for two semesters. He currently tutors in Olin on Sunday nights.

Reblogged from: Center for the Arts. (Go to the original post…)

CFA Arts Administration Intern Chloe Jones ’15 talks to Claire Marshall ’17, Trouve Ivo ’15, Alma Sanchez-Eppler ’14, and CFA Programming Intern Francesca Miller ’14 about the “Living in Song” residency workshops. Participants from the workshops will perform song, movement, and sign language in a free celebratory concert on Thursday, April 17, 2014 at 7pm in Crowell Concert Hall.  

Three members of the Grammy Award-winning African American female a cappella ensemble Sweet Honey in the Rock® [currently celebrating their 40th anniversary season] have been in residence at Wesleyan over the past month.  They’ve been teaching three different workshops for 65 Wesleyan students and Connecticut residents. The workshops have been held at the Cross Street A.M.E. Zion Church, the Green Street Arts Center, and in the Fayerweather Dance Studio on campus.

Dr. Shirley Mary Childress

Dr. Shirley Mary Childress

In “The Vocal Movement Experience” workshops, Dr. Nitanju Bolade Casel shows participants how movement and breath can serve as a catalyst for sound.  Dr. M. Louise Robinson leads “The Rhythm Ring,” workshops designed to spark musical conversation in the oral tradition of call and response.  Those in Dr. Shirley Mary Childress’ “Songs in the Way of Hand” workshops learn to understand and communicate songs visually using the vocabulary of American Sign Language.

Although each of the “Living in Song” workshops has a unique focus, they all center on ideas of community. Part of the mission of Sweet Honey in the Rock® is to engage with and empower its diverse audience. Dr. Casel, Dr. Robinson, and Dr. Childress have achieved just that with their “Living in Song” workshops.

“Looking around the room and recognizing our different backgrounds has been really empowering to me,” says Claire Marshall ’17.  “It’s been a chance to drop into a world where people don’t all come from the same place.”

The workshops provide a unique opportunity for Wesleyan students to learn alongside Middletown residents.  There are participants commuting from other parts of Connecticut as well, including a few women who sing in a choir in Hartford.

“It’s a lot more about the community than about us Wesleyan students,” says Trouve Ivo ’15.

“The group is incredibly diverse and it has been wonderful to play in this way,” comments Alma Sanchez-Eppler ’14.

A couple adults are participating alongside their home-schooled children, further broadening the age range of the workshops.  “The children are super enthusiastic,” says CFA Programming Intern Francesca Miller ’14.

Playful and enthusiastic seem to describe the general mood of the workshops.  “Everyone is always super excited to be there,” describes Mr. Ivo.

The energy cultivated in the workshops is radiant, and participants are bringing what they’ve learned into the community.  Two Wesleyan students are taking the “Songs in the Way of Hand” workshops as a way to become familiar with deaf culture in anticipation of living in Sign House next year.

The “Living in Song” workshops speak to the power of song to foster community, all the while honoring the voice of the individual.

“I’ve grown to be more comfortable with using my own voice and using song to bring a group together,” reflects Mr. Ivo.  “Vocal expression should be more present in creative communities because it’s a really incredible, uniting thing.”

Living in Song Showing
Thursday April 17, 2014 at 7pm
Crowell Concert Hall, 50 Wyllys Avenue, Middletown
FREE!

Made possible by Wesleyan’s Office of Equity and Inclusion.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Lloyd Buzzell '68]Shuffling into retirement? Read what Lloyd Buzzell ’68 has to say about his voyage into retirement. He notes: “I am no expert on the subject and have only limited experience, but I have some observations that I think are worth sharing.” As a former financial advisor, he is able to offer some practical and insightful advice.

Lloyd is currently a retired freelance writer. He has been a teacher and financial advisor during his career. He has spent time teaching at Mason Youth Institution in Cheshire, CT.

Every day, 10,000 baby boomers are retiring. A couple of months ago, I decided to join the parade at the age of 67. I am no expert on the subject and have only limited experience, but I have some observations that I think are worth sharing.

First, that life has very few certainties is something American workers of all ages have come to appreciate. I bounced through three careers — the middle one being an adviser to people in financial distress. In that role, I became convinced that the best way to long-term financial well-being is to live on less than you make and to avoid debt.

By 65 most of us have accomplished whatever it is we are going to do in the active, growing, generative phase of our lives. While Hillary Clinton may yet want to be president, from speaking informally to other baby boomers, I know that a number of us really don’t want to rise up to new challenges, new bosses and new technology at work. I know I did not.

Instead, it may be time to look beyond the professional realm and to engage in other types of involvements. Or maybe it is time to explore new types of leisure.

Read more…

Image: c/o New Haven Register/Lloyd Buzzell

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140416-lloyd-buzzell

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

[Lloyd Buzzell '68]Shuffling into retirement? Read what Lloyd Buzzell ’68 has to say about his voyage into retirement. He notes: “I am no expert on the subject and have only limited experience, but I have some observations that I think are worth sharing.” As a former financial advisor, he is able to offer some practical and insightful advice.

Lloyd is currently a retired freelance writer. He has been a teacher and financial advisor during his career. He has spent time teaching at Mason Youth Institution in Cheshire, CT.

Every day, 10,000 baby boomers are retiring. A couple of months ago, I decided to join the parade at the age of 67. I am no expert on the subject and have only limited experience, but I have some observations that I think are worth sharing.

First, that life has very few certainties is something American workers of all ages have come to appreciate. I bounced through three careers — the middle one being an adviser to people in financial distress. In that role, I became convinced that the best way to long-term financial well-being is to live on less than you make and to avoid debt.

By 65 most of us have accomplished whatever it is we are going to do in the active, growing, generative phase of our lives. While Hillary Clinton may yet want to be president, from speaking informally to other baby boomers, I know that a number of us really don’t want to rise up to new challenges, new bosses and new technology at work. I know I did not.

Instead, it may be time to look beyond the professional realm and to engage in other types of involvements. Or maybe it is time to explore new types of leisure.

Read more…

Image: c/o New Haven Register/Lloyd Buzzell

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20140416-lloyd-buzzell

Reblogged from: Center for the Arts. (Go to the original post…)

John Spike '73

John Spike ’73

Favorite Course: Art History 101

Favorite Professors: Samuel Green & Heinrich Schwarz

Center for the Arts Story: Work began on the Center for the Arts while I was an undergrad. We never saw any part of it finished, but, in keeping with Wesleyan’s penchant for the exotic and barely practical, we felt proud that it was projected to have an entire building dedicated to just the gamelan orchestra. My professor and advisor in Art History was the beloved Sam Green, who painted in a traditional realism style but favored all things modern. Sam was instrumental in securing approval for Kevin Roche’s modernist-brutalist plan for the CFA. We all had some concern about what we had wrought as the massive monolithic temple blocks were lined up in the woods, and the joke on campus was, “It looks like something designed for the Mayans but rejected by them.”

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