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Reblogged from: ENGAGE – Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Rob Rosenthal teaches a course called the Community Research Seminar, which incorporates theory and a large research project that supports a community initiative. Community partners, such as local nonprofits or agencies, submit proposals for research that would help them do their work more efficiently or effectively. This service-learning course is a unique opportunity to turn methods into practice for an immediate public benefit. 

Screen Shot 2016-05-26 at 2.17.01 PMA small group of students from the Community Research Seminar, Ryan Breen, Ellen Chang, Michelle Rosen, and Suet Ning Wong, presented their work to community partners, faculty, staff, and students with the help of TA Rebecca Jacobsen. Their presentation, titled “Exploring Factors for High School Success in Middletown,” was created in partnership with the Middlesex Coalition for Children. 

Their research sought to determine factors that influence student success in Middletown Public Schools, which includes eight elementary, two middle, and one high school. Using the indicators of GPA, high school graduation, and attendance, the students studied three cohorts of students from the graduating classes of 2012, 2013, and 2014. Their research strategy was to compare their fourth grade behavior with indicators of high school success in their senior year. 

Screen Shot 2016-05-26 at 2.17.24 PMThe team was specifically interested in finding correlations in low-income students and students of color. One factor they hoped to analyze was whether students had attended their neighborhood school or had been bused to a different school in compliance with the Connecticut Racial Imbalance Law. 

However, in compiling their data, the team found that many files were missing. Some students who had been in the Middletown district in both 4th and 12th grade had incomplete files or inconsistencies in their records. Other students had attended elementary school in Middletown and moved out of the district before high school and therefore couldn’t be tracked. By the time the team narrowed down their study to the students who they could access complete records for, their sample size was too small to find statistical significance. 

While they hoped to present data on how busing, race and ethnicity, family income, neighborhood opportunity level, and school opportunity level influenced student success, their research ended up pointing to a different problem. In order to accurately measure and judge educational interventions such as busing, school districts need better records of student data. 

Reblogged from: ENGAGE – Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Rob Rosenthal teaches a course called the Community Research Seminar, which incorporates theory and a large research project that supports a community initiative. Community partners, such as local nonprofits or agencies, submit proposals for research that would help them do their work more efficiently or effectively. This service-learning course is a unique opportunity to turn methods into practice for an immediate public benefit. 

Screen Shot 2016-05-11 at 3.15.30 PMOn Tuesday, a small group of students from the Community Research Seminar, Rilwan Babajide, Elly Blum, Hannah Maniates, and Madeline Scher, presented their work to community partners, faculty, staff, and students. Their presentation, titled “The Effects of Eviction on People in Middlesex County,” was based on qualitative data from semi-structured interviews with 28 Middlesex County residents who had experienced eviction. Their research was done in partnership with the Middlesex County Coalition on Housing and Homelessness, and supported by Program Coordinator Ann Faust. The research was intended to explore the effects of an eviction on all aspects of an individual’s life. In addition to Ann’s help, three community partners supported the students in finding evictees to interview; St. Vincent de Paul Soup Kitchen, Middlesex County Court, and the Amazing Grace Food Pantry. 

Screen Shot 2016-05-11 at 3.15.04 PMThe team presented 8 recurring themes that they found through their interviews. These were loss of agency, effects on future housing, material costs, employment, effects on families, mental health, physical health, and resilience. They found that many of these themes were intertwined. For example, a family that lost their home might have their children taken away and placed in temporary DCF custody, which greatly affected the parents’ mental health, and therefore their employment. This cascading effect was a common thread in many stories.

Screen Shot 2016-05-11 at 3.15.57 PMIn almost all cases, the effects of eviction were negative, but the team pulled out a few contradictory threads. For example, while discussing the “effects on future housing,” they explained that many evictees ended up homeless, but some were able to qualify for assistance programs and found higher quality housing than they had before. They ended the presentation on this hopeful note- the individuals who were lucky enough to access support services after being evicted were able to recover from the eviction. 

Screen Shot 2016-05-11 at 3.14.23 PMAt the end of the presentation, the students opened up the room for questions. One attendee asked, “What would you say to a landlord who hasn’t been receiving rent and decides to evict their tenants?” The students explained that only 1/4 of evictions happen formally through the courts. More than double that number happen informally. Some families described being kicked out, or locked out of their apartment because the landlord didn’t like their children. Others were evicted by the bank after their landlord’s building was foreclosed. 

Another attendee asked what the students found most surprising in their research. The presenters shared surprises, such as interviewing college graduates, which changed their perception of homelessness and eviction, or seeing how far-reaching the effects of eviction could be on someone’s familial relationships, employment, material possessions, financial stability, and health. 

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)

Wes Squirrel snack time near Fayerweather Hall on May 26. 

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)

Blooms and campus buildings, May 25 at Wesleyan University. 

Girls in Science Camp

Reblogged from: ENGAGE – Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

eve_camp_2015-0804122116Spend a week as a scientist! Perform experiments! Explore chemistry, electronics, and physics with Wesleyan professors this summer. Campers will meet college student mentors, learn about science careers, create scientific posters, and share what they learn with family and friends at a Science Showcase. 

This is a wonderful opportunity for girls entering grades 4, 5 and 6 to spend a week as a scientist this summer at the Green Street Teaching and Learning Center’s Girls in Science Camp from August 1-5, 2016.

Campers will explore biology, chemistry, physics, and more with Wesleyan Professors Erika Taylor, Ishita Mukerji, Michelle Personick, and Candice Etson. Campers will meet college student mentors, perform experiments, create scientific posters, learn about science careers, and share what they learn with family and friends at a Science Showcase on August 5. Inspired yet? You can read all about last year’s camp here

The camp is held daily from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., with breakfast and lunch included. The cost is $370 for the week. A limited number of full scholarships are available for free lunch students, partial scholarships may also be available. If you would like to request a scholarship, please write a letter to our director, Sara MacSorley, telling us how your daughter would benefit from this camp and why you currently need assistance along with documentation of your child’s free lunch status. The application deadline is June 30, 2016. Space is limited! 

For more information or to apply, visit Green Street’s website or call (860) 685-7871.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

This week’s story features Hope Ring ’89 as she looks back on the fall of her frosh year in 1985. She takes us through her experience of a category 2 hurricane with her friends in the Butts C corridor.

[Hope Ring ’89]

Dr. Hope Ring graduated from Wesleyan with a degree in English and went on to become a health professional. She is currently a practicing physician with Harrington Physician services in Massachusetts.

The Wesleyan Storytelling Project is an opportunity for alumni to share their memories of Wesleyan with each other and the wider community. It is produced by Mia Lobel ’97 and production intern Tess Altman ’17.

Listen to the clip on SoundCloud…

Images: c/o Hope Ring

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/storytelling-hope-ring-89

#THISISWHY

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Storytelling Project. (Go to the original post…)

This week’s story features Hope Ring ’89 as she looks back on the fall of her frosh year in 1985. She takes us through her experience of a category 2 hurricane with her friends in the Butts C corridor.

[Hope Ring ’89]

Dr. Hope Ring graduated from Wesleyan with a degree in English and went on to become a health professional. She is currently a practicing physician with Harrington Physician services in Massachusetts.

The Wesleyan Storytelling Project is an opportunity for alumni to share their memories of Wesleyan with each other and the wider community. It is produced by Mia Lobel ’97 and production intern Tess Altman ’17.

Listen to the clip on SoundCloud…

Images: c/o Hope Ring

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/storytelling-hope-ring-89

#THISISWHY

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)

The 184th Commencement Ceremony is underway! May 22. #wesleyan2016

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)

Members of the Class of 1981 and special guests joined together on May 21 to dedicate the West Wing of Usdan University Center in honor of Wesleyan University alumnus Bradley Whitford ’81.

Reblogged from: Wesleyan Photo. (Go to the original post…)

The annual All-College Sing was held outside North College on May 21. #wesleyan2016

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