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Reblogged from: Wesleyan Student Assembly. (Go to the original post…)

WSA President Election

Kate Cullen: 589
Madison Moore: 188

WSA Vice-President Election

Aidan Martinez: 572
Victoria Hammitt: 207

Senior Class Officer Election

President

Ellen Paik: 103
Julio Angel: 84
Michelle Lee: 66

Vice-President

Martin Malabanan: 264

Treasurer

Derrick Holman: 214

The post WSA Election Results appeared first on Wesleyan Student Assembly.

Reblogged from: Class of 2016. (Go to the original post…)

Are you thinking about your future career or considering going to grad/med/law school? Do you have a lot of questions about life post-Wes? Do you enjoy FREE MONDO PIZZA?

Join the woodframe & Fauver CAs at the Alumni Career Panel where you can ask Wesleyan alumni all of your questions!

Thursday, APRIL 23rd, 6pm – 7:30pm
41 Wyllys, room 115

Our awesome panelists have already made the transition from Wesleyan into the real world, so they will be able to provide some guidance for us students. Plus, most of them are interested in hiring Wes students after graduation! Come to learn, ask questions, and network with the following alums:

  • Melissa McCaw ’01, Budget Director at the University of Hartford
  • Brian O’Donnell ’79, Attorney at Reid and Riege
  • Kevin Egolf ’05, Managing Director of Business Operations at Iroquois Valley Farms
  • Michael Andolina ’05, MBA Candidate at the Yale School of Management
  • Win Whitcomb ’84, Chief Medical Officer at Remedy Partners

Reblogged from: ITS System Announcements. (Go to the original post…)

The Portfolio will be down for 10 minutes at 10 PM on Friday, April 17th for maintenance.  We apologize for any inconvenience.

Reblogged from: Creative Campus. (Go to the original post…)

Campus and Community Engagement Intern Michele Ko ’16 talks to Leila Buck ’99, Israa Saber ’17 and Casey Smith ’17 about “In/Between: Pieces in Progress.”

How do we balance the many roles we play, owning our identities and wanting to belong? How do we know what we think we know, see what we don’t, view ourselves and each other and engage in the spaces between? This Friday, April 17 and Saturday, April 18 at 8 pm in World Music Hall, Lebanese American writer, performer and teaching artist Leila Buck ’99 will explore these questions in “In/Between: Pieces in Progress,” a work-in-progress sharing of a collaborative theatrical work.

As part of Muslim Women’s Voices at Wesleyan, the piece reflects Buck’s semester-long engagement and collaboration with a tight-knit group of students. Throughout the spring semester, Buck met with two groups: one group of students who identify as being of Muslim heritage or culture in some way and another group of student allies interested in the topic of Muslim women. Meeting once or twice a week, Buck and the students created an informal space to talk about issues related to Muslim women, such as Charlie Hebdo and “Je Suis Charlie,” the recent shootings in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, representations of Muslims in mainstream media, feminist politics and personal experiences. Based on these conversations and interactions, Buck began crafting theatrical scenes, storytelling and playful improvisations that will be at the heart of the work-in-progress showing on April 17 and 18.

“It’s been a really wonderful opportunity to have a group of students who are so interested and engaged and coming from all these different backgrounds academically and personally and culturally, give me their thoughts and reflections on things that I’m investigating,” Buck said. “To be able to have a group where I could talk through my ideas and trust them to understand what it is I am trying to create and hear their responses and get their feedback, has just been enormously helpful in and has shaped the piece.”

The students who were involved joined the project for a variety of reasons. For Israa Saber, a sophomore majoring in Government with a Middle Eastern Studies certificate, contributing her own experience as a Muslim woman to the project was important to her.

“Finding out that this would be happening here and I could help in it and give my perspective, which isn’t really asked for very often, was something that I really wanted to do to make sure Muslim women’s voices are heard,” Saber said.

Students rehearse with Leila Buck in World Music Hall.

Students rehearse with Leila Buck in World Music Hall.

 

For Casey Smith, a sophomore majoring in CSS with certificates in Middle Eastern Studies and International Relations, the project was a continuation of her work with Leila the previous semester, when she audited Leila’s class, Beyond “the Veil”: Representations and Realities of Muslim Women in the U.S.. Smith had spent the summer before in Oman on a scholarship from the State Department to study Arabic and planned to engage with her experiences in Leila’s fall semester class and spring semester project. Once Smith began attending the meetings, her relationship to the project shifted as she found many connections to her academic studies.

“First I thought I was going to contribute like, ‘Oh, I’ve lived in the Middle East for a bit and met a lot of Muslim women’ and that was my first way in,” said Smith. “But for CSS and other classes I read a lot of political and social theory and the more academic perspective of things we’ve been talking about. I found myself being like ‘Oh, I’m going to email Leila my Middle Eastern Studies paper’ or ‘Oh, this is a paper I wrote last year in my Islam class about the historical context for representations of Muslim in the media.’ So I think my academic background has fit really nicely into this project and I’ve been able to contribute a lot of theory.”

Participating in Leila’s artistic process has also influenced the students’ perspectives on art and art production. For Smith, being involved in the project allowed her to reevaluate the connections between art, social change and academics.

“I had never really experienced using art as a mode of social commentary or advocating for awareness of social justice issues before this, so I think that’s been cool to interact with an issue I’m interested in academically in a way that is connected to the arts,” said Smith. “I’m a dancer, so I’ve done a lot of arts stuff, but I’ve never really combined my academic interests with arts.”

The project also allowed students to form bonds with each other and with Leila. The connections Saber formed through this project has impacted her relationship to Wesleyan.

“My town that I lived in and the communities I’ve always been a part of have been majority Muslim, specifically Egyptian Muslims, so coming to Wesleyan and finding no one, especially last year when I was the only person wearing a hijab, it was just very alienating. There was no one I could really connect to. I had thought of transferring out to a place with more Muslims that I could connect to especially because there was very limited activities with the Muslim Student Association and there wasn’t an Arab student group here,” Saber said. “But now, I guess this project was what convinced me to stay, honestly. I was like finally, I’ll have someone to connect to or someone who looks like me, grew up like me. I’m so happy this project happened. I really needed it.”

Smith developed a close relationship to Leila through being in her class last semester and engaging with this project.

“She’s the kind of person who’s very open and I am able to contact her about things that aren’t about this project,” Smith said, pointing to how she once made turkey chili with Leila at her house or how she called Leila after the Chapel Hill shootings. “She’s just really good at being there for her students as humans with feelings and not just as people to teach and then leave at the door,” Smith said.

The project has also influenced Saber and Smith’s reflections on their futures. Saber found inspiration in Leila’s work to work with Muslim communities.

“Meeting with Leila was kind of a ‘you can do what you love and still do it for the people that you identify with,” said Saber. “I’ve been feeling a lot of ‘what do I want to do with my life?’ because I also want to work with the Muslim- Middle Eastern community. So it was inspirational, sort of like, ‘you know what, I’ll just do it.’” Saber is interested in journalism and international law, particularly human rights law.

The project provided Smith, who is interested in working to address women’s rights in the Middle East, with new perspectives on social justice work. “Leila’s work has made me think a lot about how feminism, that’s kind of a Western movement, can overlap with cultures that aren’t Western and how can we find a way to reconcile those two things. It’s made me want to work with Muslim women and at organizations that aren’t just a bunch of Western people deciding what’s wrong with the rest of the world,” Smith said.

Looking towards this weekend’s performance, Buck reflected on the importance of the collaborative process. “Whatever happens on Friday or Saturday, this group and the process we’ve gone through together has been the greatest journey of this project for me,” Buck said. “That and the class I taught [in the fall] has been so profoundly meaningful and inspiring and has been by far the most important thing I feel I’ve done during my residence at Wesleyan. I hope very much that we are able to share our goals and that journey and invite the audience into it.”

Being on stage at Wesleyan this weekend will also have sentimental value for Buck, a Wes alumus.

“It’s been really meaningful to come back to the campus where I started to write and where I was formed as an artist,” said Buck. “I feel that Wesleyan students and professors that I’ve engaged with have such an ability to see the complexity and the gray area and the nuance of things and to look for it when it’s not being shared. They also are so open to self-reflection and recognizing the importance of putting yourself and your background in context. That has been so valuable to work with,” said Buck.

 

 

 

Reblogged from: Class of 2017. (Go to the original post…)

THE PHYSIOLOGY OF DRUGS

Wednesday, April 15, 8 p.m., Memorial Chapel

What is actually happening inside your body?

Mike Robinson, Assistant Professor of Psychology and of Neuroscience & Behavior

Stefanie Jones, Drug Policy Alliance

Mark Neavyn, M.D., Director, Medical Toxicology, Department of Emergency Medicine, Hartford Hospital

Moderator: Ishita Mukerji, Dean of the Natural Sciences and Mathematics

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Cynthia Rockwell

[Hilary Jacobs Hendel ’85, P’18]Hilary Jacobs Hendel ’85 P’18, psychotherapist and clinical supervisor with the AEDP Institute, offers an alternative diagnosis for a seemingly depressed client in a New York Times Opinionator piece. On March 10, 2015, her column was the #1 most emailed and the #2 most read piece that day.

Growing up in a family of doctors, “we always talked about Freud,” she recalls. Then, a conference at Mt. Sinai introduced her to the AEDP Institute— the home for accelerated experiential-dynamic psychotherapy. “It resonated as true on a personal level. I’d always struggled with the dispassionate Freudian analytic stance. AEDP is nonpathologizing; you look at the symptoms as ones that were initially helpful and adaptive.

“I had no idea this column would strike a chord. The editor said that more than 300 thousand people read the column: It speaks to the fact that we need emotional education. So many kids are anxious; there’s so much stimulation. If we could explain some basics neurological concepts so people can understand themselves and not feel shame, wondering ‘Why do I feel this way?’ I hope to write more columns that can introduce psychological and neuroscience concepts to a lay audience.”

How can it be that a seemingly depressed person, one who shows clinical symptoms, doesn’t respond to antidepressants or psychotherapy? Perhaps because the root of his anguish is something else.

Several years ago a patient named Brian was referred to me. He had suffered for years from an intractable depression for which he had been hospitalized. He had been through cognitive behavioral therapy, psychoanalytic psychotherapy, supportive therapy and dialectical behavioral therapy. He had tried several medication “cocktails,” each with a litany of side effects that made them virtually intolerable. They had been ineffective anyway. The next step was electroshock therapy, which Brian did not want.

When he first came to see me, Brian was practically in a comatose state. He could barely bring himself to speak, and his voice, when I managed to get anything out of him, was meek. His body was rigid, his facial expression blank. He couldn’t look me in the eye. Yes, he seemed extremely depressed. But knowing he had been treated for depression for years without good results, I wondered about the diagnosis.

Read more…

Image: c/o Hilary Jacobs Hendel

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20150415-hilary-jacobs-hendel

#THISISWHY

Related links

[LinkedIn] connect with Hilary Jacobs Hendel on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: Wesconnect News. (Go to the original post…)

By Cynthia Rockwell

[Hilary Jacobs Hendel ’85, P’18]Hilary Jacobs Hendel ’85 P’18, psychotherapist and clinical supervisor with the AEDP Institute, offers an alternative diagnosis for a seemingly depressed client in a New York Times Opinionator piece. On March 10, 2015, her column was the #1 most emailed and the #2 most read piece that day.

Growing up in a family of doctors, “we always talked about Freud,” she recalls. Then, a conference at Mt. Sinai introduced her to the AEDP Institute— the home for accelerated experiential-dynamic psychotherapy. “It resonated as true on a personal level. I’d always struggled with the dispassionate Freudian analytic stance. AEDP is nonpathologizing; you look at the symptoms as ones that were initially helpful and adaptive.

“I had no idea this column would strike a chord. The editor said that more than 300 thousand people read the column: It speaks to the fact that we need emotional education. So many kids are anxious; there’s so much stimulation. If we could explain some basics neurological concepts so people can understand themselves and not feel shame, wondering ‘Why do I feel this way?’ I hope to write more columns that can introduce psychological and neuroscience concepts to a lay audience.”

How can it be that a seemingly depressed person, one who shows clinical symptoms, doesn’t respond to antidepressants or psychotherapy? Perhaps because the root of his anguish is something else.

Several years ago a patient named Brian was referred to me. He had suffered for years from an intractable depression for which he had been hospitalized. He had been through cognitive behavioral therapy, psychoanalytic psychotherapy, supportive therapy and dialectical behavioral therapy. He had tried several medication “cocktails,” each with a litany of side effects that made them virtually intolerable. They had been ineffective anyway. The next step was electroshock therapy, which Brian did not want.

When he first came to see me, Brian was practically in a comatose state. He could barely bring himself to speak, and his voice, when I managed to get anything out of him, was meek. His body was rigid, his facial expression blank. He couldn’t look me in the eye. Yes, he seemed extremely depressed. But knowing he had been treated for depression for years without good results, I wondered about the diagnosis.

Read more…

Image: c/o Hilary Jacobs Hendel

Share this link: wesconnect.wesleyan.edu/news-20150415-hilary-jacobs-hendel

#THISISWHY

Related links

[LinkedIn] connect with Hilary Jacobs Hendel on LinkedIn ➞

Don’t have a Facebook account, but want to comment? Email us.

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Several of the student coordinators in the Office of Community Service will be graduating this May, and while we’re very sad to see them go, it’s exciting to welcome new leaders into the fold! If you’re an organized and innovative team player who would like experience in community engagement and volunteer management, apply today to serve as an OCS coordinator during the 2015-2016 school year.

Over 750 students participate in OCS programs each year, and our coordinators are key to supporting a culture of engagement at Wesleyan. Our 21 student-led programs touch innumerable lives, and we rely on the ingenuity and reliability of coordinators to lead highly effective programs rooted in community-identified needs.

In addition to strengthening community partnerships, recruiting and training volunteers, and otherwise improving their programs, coordinators are expected to attend semesterly trainings, monthly meetings, and weekly office hours.

Contact OCS Coordinator Diana Martinez and individual program coordinators with any questions. To apply, fill out the application on OrgSync. This is a paid position that also provides mentorship and professional development. The deadline is noon on Sunday, April 19.

The following groups are hiring at least one coordinator:

Individual Tutoring
Contact: Diondre Davis (dsdavis@wesleyan.edu)

Language Bank
Contact: Neha Shafique (nshafique@wesleyan.edu)

Wesleyan Alliance for Generational Exchange (WesAGE)
Contacts: elderly@wesleyan.edu, Sheri Reichelson (sreichelson@wesleyan.edu), Matthew Lynch (malynch@wesleyan.edu), Rachel Earnhardt (rearnhardt@wesleyan.edu), and Gabe Borelli (gborelli@wesleyan.edu)

Hunger & Homelessness
Contacts: Evan Bieder (ebieder@wesleyan.edu), Fred Ayres (fayres@wesleyan.edu)

Bread Salvage
Contact: James Hall (jthall@wesleyan.edu)

Adolescent Sexual Health Awareness (ASHA)
Contacts: Emily Moody (emoody@wesleyan.edu), Tali Robbins (arobbins@wesleyan.edu)

North End Mentors
Contact: Kenny On (kon@wesleyan.edu)

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

Haenah Kwon ’17, Caren Ye ’17, and friends have launched a new magazine and blog called The Subway Ride. They are currently seeking submissions from “shy artists,” staff members, non-traditional students, Middletown residents, and anyone else in the community who has artwork or writing to share but hasn’t found the right venue just yet. The (flexible) deadline is Thursday, April 16, and the theme (also flexible) is “terminal.” Submissions can be anonymous.

Check out their OrgSync profile and send submissions/questions to thesubwayride@gmail.com.

subway

Reblogged from: ENGAGE - Wesleyan University. (Go to the original post…)

On Sunday, April 19, local senior citizens and Wesleyan students will convene in Beckham Hall for a celebration of our community’s cultural diversity. Restaurants from downtown Middletown have kindly donated desserts, and several student groups will entertain and educate the crowd with performances and presentations.

Come by Beckham between 2:45 and 4:30 PM to enjoy the occasion with our elderly neighbors, and contact the coordinators of WesAGE (Wesleyan Alliance for Generational Exchange) at elderly@wesleyan.edu to volunteer with set-up/take-down.

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