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Tag Archive 'poetry'

Join us @ AWP2017, in Washington DC! Booth #137 Come to our panel! Working with Archives—Ethics, Strategies, and Methods Saturday, February 11, 2017 – 1:30pm-2:45pm Marquis Salon 1 & 2, Marriott Marquis, Meeting Level Two Gerald Vizenor Jena Osman Harmony Holiday Daniel Tiffany Writers sometimes use archival records as sources of inspiration and information. Our…

New & Forthcoming Poetry from Wesleyan University Press  “You know when you look at a word until it means nothing and then, suddenly and at last, everything? The word is poetry. The poet is Rae Armantrout.” —Daniel Handler, author of the national bestseller We Are Pirates A collection of new and selected poetry from Pulitzer prize-winning author,…

A book published by Wesleyan University Press is a finalist for the National Book Award!

Peter Gizzi’s “Archeophonics” is a series of discrete poems that are linked by repeated phrases, words and themes of joy, outrage, loss, transhistorical thought, and day-to-day life.

The winner will be announced at the National Book Award ceremony on Nov. 16.

The imagined narratives of seven native exiles from the White Earth Nation Gerald Vizenor creates masterful, truthful, surreal, and satirical fiction similar to the speculative fiction of Margaret Atwood and Neil Gaiman.  In this imagined future, seven natives are exiled from federal sectors that have replaced federal reservations; they pursue the liberty of an egalitarian…

When asked about his favorite poem, Michael Rothenburg replied with “Hymnus Ad Patrem Sinensis” by Philip Whalen from The Collected Poems of Philip Whalen. Hymnus Ad Patrem Sinensis I praise those ancient Chinamen Who left me a few words, Usually a pointless joke or a silly question A line of poetry drunkenly scrawled on the…

When asked about her favorite poem, Sarah Blake replied with “Etymology of an Untranslated Cervix” by Monica Ong from Silent Anatomies.   ETYMOLOGY of an UNTRANSLATED CERVIX In Rufumbira, the local language here in Kisoro, there is no word for cervix, and the word vagina is a shameful, dirt word, rarely uttered. -Erin Cox, MD This space…

When we at Wesleyan University Press asked poet Marianne Boruch to select one of her favorite poems, she replied two poems by the late poet Russell Edson.   This being spring, specifically April, and heralded for a while now—for good and ill—under the name of Poetry (capital P), here’s part of an email I got in…

When asked about his favorite poems, Pierre Joris replied with Paul Celan’s “Line the wordcaves” from Fadensonnen / Threadsuns.   LINE THE WORDCAVES with panther skins, widen them, hide-to and hide-fro, sense-hither and sense-thither, give them courtyards, chambers, drop doors and wildnesses, parietal, and listen for their second and each time second and second tone. KLEIDE…

When asked about her favorite poems, Rae Armantrout replied with “1259” by Emily Dickinson. We’re sharing the poem today, to celebrate National Poetry Month and Rae Armantrout’s birthday!   1259 A Wind that rose Though not a Leaf In any Forest stirred But with itself did cold engage Beyond the Realm of Bird— A Wind…

Announcing 2 books by TED GREENWALD

“Is it cynical or is it innocent? He has an almost machinic way. But is it utopian? The most progressive of Ted Greenwald’s poems are just that. No, they all are: forward thinking, Sagittarian, and wildly Americanly kind.”    –Eileen Myles We are pleased to announce the release of two noteworthy books by prolific poet Ted…

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